Big Science Trying to Wipe Egg Off Its Face

first_img(Visited 578 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Science scandals and crises are reminding observers that scientific reliability is no more reliable than the people who make a living in science.Are palaeontologists naming too many species? (Science Daily). Human ego can get in the way of science. Paleontologists earn fame by having fossils named after them, so it’s tempting for them to “split” similar fossils into different species rather than to “lump” them together. Judy Massare (SUNY College at Brockport, New York) and Dean Lomax (U of Manchester) bring this problem to light in the case of naming extinct sea reptiles named ichthyosaurs (scientific jargon for “fish-lizards”). “After their latest research project,” this article says, “the pair urge caution in naming new fossil species on the basis of just a few fragmentary or isolated remains.” After studying the hind fins of one form of ichthyosaur, they realized that they could all be considered variations of a single species.Palaeontologists fall into one of two camps when it comes to naming species, ‘lumpers’ and ‘splitters’. The former ‘lump’ groups of similar specimens together, whereas the latter opt to split-up specimens and distinguish new species. However, in this new study, if the team opted to split-up the specimens based on the variation found, it would suggest a huge number of species.They remarked that splitters could have labeled these specimens as 19 different species! Splitting was a common practice before, misleading the public (and other scientists) about the amount of variation in nature. “This would be similar to what was done in the 19th Century when any new fossil find, from a new location or horizon, was named as a new species if it differed slightly from previously known specimens.” This implies that a moral failing 150 years old is still with today’s science. Will honest discussion of the problem be sufficient to stop fossil hunters from succumbing to the temptation for fame?The pre-registration revolution (PNAS). The scientific method was all worked out centuries ago, right? That’s what students are usually taught. Once again, though, any “method” is only going to be as reliable as the fallible human being who applies it. Part of the high school student’s understanding of “the scientific method” (actually, there is no one method) is to propose a hypothesis and then test it with experiments. But like a famous proverb not said by Yogi Berra, “In theory, there is no difference between practice and theory. In practice, there is.”This paper tries to wipe some egg off the faces of scientists who have violated the spirit of the scientific method by post-dicting their hypotheses instead of predicting them. It’s a bit like a false prophet watching something happen then proclaiming that he predicted it would happen. Some researchers are tempted to goof around with observations, watch what happens, and then propose a hypothesis after the fact. Lo and behold, the hypothesis was proved by testing! Only the scientist and the team may know.In this PNAS article, five commentators think that forcing scientists to publicly state a hypothesis before testing it (a policy called preregistration) might make science more credible.Progress in science relies in part on generating hypotheses with existing observations and testing hypotheses with new observations. This distinction between postdiction and prediction is appreciated conceptually but is not respected in practice. Mistaking generation of postdictions with testing of predictions reduces the credibility of research findings. However, ordinary biases in human reasoning, such as hindsight bias, make it hard to avoid this mistake. An effective solution is to define the research questions and analysis plan before observing the research outcomes—a process called preregistration. Preregistration distinguishes analyses and outcomes that result from predictions from those that result from postdictions. A variety of practical strategies are available to make the best possible use of preregistration in circumstances that fall short of the ideal application, such as when the data are preexisting. Services are now available for preregistration across all disciplines, facilitating a rapid increase in the practice. Widespread adoption of preregistration will increase distinctiveness between hypothesis generation and hypothesis testing and will improve the credibility of research findings.Cases where “data are preexisting” illustrate some of the challenges to making preregistration work. How can you test something that is already known? Many evolutionary explanations fall into this category. What can an evolutionist do with a fossil record that is fairly complete? Say that “my hypothesis is that a transitional form will be found in Texas in strata between the Carboniferous and Jurassic” or something like that? Even if Big Science comes up with “practical strategies” that work for all cases, those will only work if all scientists practice them. In practice, individual researchers have shown themselves to be creative at conniving to get around best practices, especially if fame or funding are at stake.Racist cover of National Geographic, August 2002, about the Dmanisi skull, portrayed to look primitive and dark-skinned.National Geographic acknowledges past racist coverage (Phys.org). Generations of adolescent boys can remember flipping through pages of National Geographic Magazine looking for photos of bare-bosomed “people of color,” but aside from whatever titillation they enjoyed, they were also getting a subliminal message: non-westerners were likely to be naked savages.National Geographic acknowledged on Monday that it covered the world through a racist lens for generations, with its magazine portrayals of bare-breasted women and naive brown-skinned tribesmen as savage, unsophisticated and unintelligent.“We had to own our story to move beyond it,” editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg told The Associated Press in an interview about the yellow-bordered magazine’s April issue, which is devoted to race.Former editors of the popular magazine tended to perpetuate clichés of white racial superiority through their photographs and descriptions of natives from non-western countries. They gave the impression that “people of color” tend to be “exotics, famously and frequently unclothed, happy hunters, noble savages”—common stereotypes from Darwin’s day, but highly politically incorrect these days. And yet to many readers, National Geographic Magazine was an authoritative source of science, popularizing science with vivid images and stories. Alongside the now-acknowledged racist content would be stories from the space program, the frontiers of physics, and biology. And who can forget the numerous cover stories on human evolution, with alleged pre-human ancestors commonly shown with dark skin?It is only proper for Goldberg to acknowledge past sins and strive to correct them. Yet the past sins were reflections of the culture of their time. What steps is Goldberg and the magazine taking to isolate their coverage from present sins and biases? Is that even possible? It’s easy to joke ‘National Gee—a Gaffe (ick!)’ now, but what will future moralizers say about current publications? NG still contains overwhelmingly biased coverage of Darwinian evolution. Not all that long ago, they did have to issue an apology (in fine print) for their cover story jumping to the conclusion that so-called Archaeoraptor was a transitional form between dinosaurs and birds. They continue to indulge in ‘historical racism’ by portraying ‘archaic humans’ as less evolved than themselves.Crisis or self-correction: Rethinking how the media cover science (Phys.org). This article tries to rehabilitate the image of science by the media. ‘Crisis? What crisis?’ gives the flavor. ‘It’s much ado about nothing.’ The media are inflating and over-generalizing a few cases, giving an impression that science is broken.The article, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and authored by Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, examines three media storylines used to describe the nature of scientific discovery. Jamieson writes that one of the narratives – that science is “in crisis” or “broken” – is especially concerning and may have been inadvertently encouraged by scientists’ efforts to find and correct problems in scientific practice.“This is troubling in part because defective narratives can enhance the capacity of partisans to discredit areas of science – including genetic engineering, vaccination, and climate change – containing findings that are ideologically uncongenial to them,” Jamieson writes. “In contrast, accurate narratives can increase public understanding not only of the nature of the discovery process, but also of the inevitability of false starts and occasional fraud.”The issue is important, Jamieson says, because the news media affect the extent to which we think about a subject and how we think about it, and misleading accounts about science can affect the public’s trust in science. The “science is broken” story has appeared in outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, The Atlantic, Vox and Slate.Actually, the “narratives” that science is broken or in crisis are often stated bluntly in leading journals such as PNAS, Science, and Nature (ex., 24 April 2016). The “reproducibility crisis” in psychology and a similar crisis in medical reporting concern large numbers of flawed papers, not just a few “false starts and occasional fraud.” These Big Science institutions are suggesting major revisions in thinking and important large initiatives to combat the problems. It’s especially telling that this article, coming from the University of Pennsylvania, “cites genetic engineering, vaccination and climate change” as potential victims of flawed narratives, when controversy about those subjects tends to track political party lines (as does evolution). The authors also repeat the myth that science is a “self-correcting process’ (see 8 Feb 2016, 24 April 2016, and 6 Jan 2018). National Geographic had to own up to its racism to begin to address it. In the same way, Big Science has to own up to its crises, not excuse them as mere “narratives.”Postpublication peer review: A crucial tool (Science). Another example to prove that the science crisis is not a mere ‘dust-up’ or exaggeration is found in Science, where Gregory Isaac Peterson advocates post-publication peer review as a solution to many problems with the current peer review system.The current peer-review model used throughout science is not perfect. Whether it be the result of poor experimental design, accident, or academic misconduct, publication of irreproducible, incorrect, or fabricated results occurs more frequently than it should [check Retraction Watch for recent examples]. This leads not only to a waste of precious time and financial resources as scientists try to replicate or build on flawed research but also to damage to the reputation of science and to much larger societal impacts (such as the loss of public trust in science and loss of federal funding).One reason Peterson gives for the disparity between the ideal and the real concerns human nature. “This disparity likely stems from the reality that overworked scientists do not have time for activities that provide little to no recognition.” The comment shows that scientists are not robots cranking out knowledge for its own sake. A human being’s desire for recognition cannot be ignored.Scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators (Phys.org). Guilty scientists don’t just hurt their own reputations; they hurt everyone who worked with them. The case of Viswat Jit Gupta (see commentary below) illustrates the point. Prof. Katrin Hussinger of the University of Luxembourg warns scientists that they must choose their collaborators carefully lest their own reputations suffer if someone is accused of misconduct later through “guilt by association.”“The results of the study are worrisome,” explained Prof. Hussinger. “Our research shows that guilt by association stretches back to projects prior to the fraud case and thereby to unsuspecting and uninvolved co-workers.“Another related worry, Hussinger points out, is that the fear of guilt by association could lead to under-reporting of fraud. “Knowing that they might be penalised for mere association might make researchers think twice before speaking out,” she says. Who knows, therefore, how much fraud is really going on? The solution cannot come from method or phenomena; it is a matter of personal moral choices. “Trust is a crucial aspect of communicating science and conveying research results to the public,” she says. “The ripple effects of one misconduct case can put at risk the reputation of a much larger group of scientists and even institutions.”How, exactly, did “trust” evolve, Dr. Hussinger? Nowhere is the reality of crisis better seen than in articles about Darwinian evolution. In his book Evolution’s Blunders, Frauds and Forgeries, Dr. Jerry Bergman documents dozens of unbelievable frauds—some of them recent—that fooled all the leading scientists of their day, not just laypeople who received “defective narratives” from the press. For instance, he shows how Professor Viswat Jit Gupta so messed up the field of Himalayan stratigraphy using fake fossils in the 1990’s to 2000’s that the field may never be able to clean up the mess (pp 78-81). In his last 25 years, he published some 300 papers in major journals, “all of which are now in doubt, as also are some of the numerous papers based, in part, on Gupta’s research.” Science often proceeds by citing papers. This dishonest individual planted fossils from museums in strata, lied about where they were found, and committed other acts of fraud. Because of one man’s misconduct, all his collaborators are also tainted. Gupta’s papers are not the only ones in doubt. How many scientists relied on his ‘research’ and cited his papers as trustworthy?Some frauds or just errors have escaped detection for decades, even centuries. Remember that Piltdown Man fooled the world’s experts for 40 years. National Geographic posted numerous cover stories about human evolution, particularly those about the work of Louis and Mary Leakey, for decades that are no longer believed. What current frauds and forgeries, yet to be revealed, are misleading scientists and the public about evolution? Evolutionists had better get out of the hoax of Darwinian evolution now. It has the potential for a colossal meltdown that may tarnish the reputation of science forever.last_img read more

Mississippi State Earned Every Bit Of That Upset Over UConn

Wow.I mean, wow.Mississippi State’s victory over UConn was a great game, and a great upset. Mississippi State will go down in history as the team that ended the longest win streak in basketball (and possibly college team sports) history, and they did it in style.First off, let’s be clear that this is not the most improbable upset of all time. The FiveThirtyEight March Madness predictions gave Mississippi State a 13 percent chance of winning, which — if accurate — wouldn’t even make the dais in the celebration of greatest upsets in history. It wasn’t even the Bulldogs’ biggest upset this week, as our model gave them only an 11 percent chance of beating Baylor, who they beat 94-85 in the Elite Eight. Yes, some people (like this idiot) thought 13 percent was crazy high given UConn’s history, not to mention the 98-38 beatdown the Huskies gave the same Bulldogs team in last year’s Sweet 16.But if I went into this game thinking the model was too optimistic for Mississippi State, by halftime it started looking like that 13 percent might have been low. Not only was UConn not dominating, they were getting outplayed.For me, this is what made this upset even more amazing. Sometimes the better team’s shot goes cold or the underdog’s heats up at the right time, and there isn’t much to do about it except try to do better next game. That was not this game.Shooting and shooting opportunitiesTo my eye, the UConn offense looked frustrated all night, yet they were easily still the better shooting team. UConn shot 42 percent on 2-point shots and 47 percent on 3-point shots, while Mississippi State shot 42 percent and 27 percent, respectively. All together, the Huskies scored 1.12 points per shot (counting 2-point shooting fouls) compared to 0.90 points per shot for the Bulldogs.That should be a recipe for a nice comfortable win. But the Huskies had only 57 shooting possessions (46 shots from the floor, plus 11 shooting fouls), while the Bulldogs had 73 (67 plus 6).How did Mississippi State get 16 more shooting opportunities? Like so:According to the play-by-play of the game on ESPN, the Bulldogs had 16 rebounds on offense to the Huskies’ six, creating ten more scoring opportunities.1You may notice the ESPN box score gives Mississippi State only 14 offensive rebounds. The reason for the discrepancy between the box score and the play-by-play data is unclear to me without knowing more about the nuances of NCAA scoring methodology, but those two extra scoring opportunities happened.The Bulldogs had 13 turnovers to the Huskies’ 17, which created four more opportunities for Mississippi State.2Note the box score records 14 Bulldogs turnovers, but one of those is referring to the flagrant-1 foul that gave Connecticut two shots and the ball, which did not lead to a change of possession.The Bulldogs had the last offensive possession in all five periods, and started with the ball in the second and third quarters, netting them two extra “fencepost” possessions.To recap: Mississippi State netted ten extra shot opportunities from rebounding, four from steals/ball protection, and two from clock management.UConn’s offensive failureThose possession stats are the “what” of “what happened” – the Bulldogs made up a sizeable shooting gap by edging the Huskies in the other aspects of the game. But why did it happen?The story of this game was the UConn offense continuously trying — and failing — to penetrate Mississippi State’s interior defense. This was reflected in a few ways:The Huskies made just 42 percent of their 2-point shots, compared to 58 percent in the regular season.Despite all those misses, they got only six of 29 possible offensive boards, for 21 percent. Compare that to 36 percent in the regular season.The Huskies turned the ball over 17 times (eight stolen). With just four steals themselves, they forced 13 fewer turnovers than they committed. In the regular season, they forced 1.7 fewer turnovers from steals than the total number of turnovers they committed per game, on average. Much of the deficit Friday night resulted from interior passes that the Bulldogs got their hands on.The irony is that UConn was shooting better than average from beyond the arc, making 47 percent of its threes, compared to their regular-season average of 40 percent. Despite being frustrated all night trying to get to the basket, they just kept trying and trying. As I saw it, it looked like the Huskies responded to their struggles by trying to get back to “fundamental” rim-attacking basketball, when they probably should have gone less fundamental and bombed away from the perimeter.Oh, and Connecticut also missed a couple of free throws that probably could have sealed the deal. This could have been nerves, but who knows. If the teams were who we thought they were, the game shouldn’t have been close enough for that to matter.After Mississippi State beat Baylor, a team we though had a real chance of beating UConn, my main thought was that Baylor probably wasn’t as good as I thought they were. But I should have been giving Mississippi State more credit. Against UConn, they earned it all, with full backpay.Correction (April 3, 4:06 p.m.): A previous version of this article incorrectly identified the sources of some of Mississippi State’s extra scoring opportunities. The article incorrectly said that six of those opportunities came from their three fewer turnovers, when three fewer turnovers would only account for three extra opportunities. Using the play-by-play data to account for the remaining discrepancy, we determined that Mississippi State netted four opportunities from turnovers instead of six, and 10 opportunities from rebounding instead of eight. read more

TCIs Jennings makes IAAF 400m semi finals in Kenya

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#ColbyJenningsJamaicaCollege, #IAAFWorldYouthGames, #magneticmedianews, #NairobiKenyaGames, #runColbyrun, #TCIrepresentedatIAAFYouthGames Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNairobi, Kenya – July 14, 2017 – Happening today, let’s keep young Colby Jennings in good thoughts as he represents the Turks and Caicos in Nairobi, Kenya at the IAAF World Youth Games.Jennings is in strong medal contention at these games in the 400m.Colby Jennings is currently attending Jamaica College and travelled to the Games without any TCI chaperone, but yesterday ran almost a new personal record to place second in his heat.Young Jennings moves on today to the semi finals.  Jamaica College is giving Jennings props for his performance and so are we.last_img read more

Fitbit Versa 2 could be coming next month

first_img See It Mentioned Above Fitbit Versa (rose gold/peach) See It Comment The first Versa’s battery lasts between three and four days, but only seven hours while playing music. The Versa comes in black and peach versions, while the Lite comes in white, lilac, marina blue, mulberry and charcoal. The Versa sequel will be available Sept. 15, the report said. Fitbit said in an emailed statement it doesn’t have news to share just yet. “We appreciate the interest and excitement around new Fitbit products,” the spokesperson said. “We are constantly working on new devices to help people live healthier lives.” Originally published Aug. 15, 2:04 p.m. PT. Update, 3:25 p.m.: Adds statement from Fitbit. 52 Photos 3:45 More on fitness trackers $199 5 reasons why fitness trackers don’t guarantee you’ll… Now playing: Watch this: See it $169 Fitbit’s new lineup: Versa Lite, Inspire, Inspire HR and Ace 2 How To • Apple Watch 3 vs. Fitbit Versa: Which smartwatch should you buy? $159 11 tips and tricks for your new Fitbit Versa Fitbit Charge 3 vs. Versa: Which is the best fitness tracker?center_img Share your voice Mobile Wearable Tech Walmart Abt Electronics Fitbit Versa News • Fitbit Versa Lite and Inspire HR cost $160 or less CNET may get a commission from retail offers. See It 1 The Fitbit Versa Lite launched earlier in 2019. Sarah Tew/CNET Update, Aug. 28: The Fitbit Versa 2 did indeed launch. Original story follows.The Fitbit Versa 2 is reportedly launching next month and could include features like Alexa voice commands, more than four days of battery life, music storage and Fitbit Pay capabilities. Citing leaked marketing for the rumored next-gen fitness tracker, Android Central reported Wednesday that the gadget will also come with a microphone and 24/7 heart-rate monitoring. The first Fitbit Versa was priced at $199 and came out in April 2018, while the budget-edition Fitbit Versa Lite launched earlier this year for $160. The two fitness trackers are now priced at just $170 and $130, respectively. Review • Fitbit Versa review: Giving Apple Watch a run for its money $169 Dell Tags Fitbit Alexalast_img read more

Criminal complaint against BJP leader Gautam Gambhir for allegedly holding 2 voter

first_imgBJP’s Lok Sabha candidate from East Delhi, Gautam Gambhir addresses a press conference in New Delhi, on April 25, 2019.IANSGautam Gambhir, former cricketer and one of Bharatiya Janata Party’s latest members, found himself in hot water after his AAP rival Atishi accused him of possessing two voter ID cards.Atishi brought the matter to light when she tweeted on April 26 that Gambhir possessed a voter ID for Karol Bagh as well as Rajinder Nagar. She has even filed a criminal complaint.In another tweet, she wrote, “Under Section 17, read with Section 31, false declaration in the matter of electoral rolls is punishable with jail time of up to one year.”If Gambhir is found guilty, he could face a jail sentence of one year. The complaint was filed at the Tis Hazari court in Delhi.Atishi had tweeted, “I have filed a criminal complaint against the BJP candidate from East Delhi Gautam Gambhir over his possession of two voter IDs in two separate constituencies of Delhi, Karol Bagh and Rajinder Nagar. #GambhirApradh.” TwitterIn her complaint, she also demanded the immediate disqualification of the cricketer-turned-politician. In addition to this, AAP president and Delhi chief minister Arvind Kejriwal tweeted to the Delhi voters saying that there is no point in voting for a leader who is soon to be disqualified.According to News18, Gambhir rubbished the claims stating “First they make allegations, then go to court and then they apologise.” Gambhir has been in the eye of the fire ever since he joined the BJP in March and was fielded from the East Delhi constituency.Earlier this week, both the Congress and the Aam Aadmi Party had called for the disqualification of Gambhir over an alleged problem in his nomination papers. However, their claims were rubbished by the polling officer who said that there is “substantial compliance” in his papers and his nomination will be accepted, reports NDTV.Gambhir’s nomination exposed the fact that he is the richest candidate to be fielded in Delhi with Rs 147 crore worth of movable and immovable assets.last_img read more

BJP set to give deathly blow to CongressJDS alliance on its 1st

first_imgHD Kumaraswamy with his wife and son along with DK Suresh posing for the camera after casting votes.HD Kumaraswamy Twitter AccountThe BJP is set to register its best-ever performance in the Lok Sabha elections in Karnataka. If we go by the early trends, the saffron party is leading in 23 seats, which eventually could come as a deathly blow to the Congress-JD (S) alliance on its first anniversary.Till the story went for publishing, Congress was leading in three seats – Bangalore Rural, Bangalore Central and Chamarajanagar, while JD (S) was leading in only in Haasan constituency. There is a neck-to-neck fight between JD (S) candidate Nikhil Gowda and independent candidate Sumalatha in Mandya.The heavyweights of Congress and JD(S) like Mallikarjun Kharge (Kalaburagi), who had won 10 consecutive elections, former Prime Minister HD Deve Gowda (Tumakuru), former Chief Minister Veerappa Moily (Chikkaballapur)and KH Muniyappa (Kolar) are trailing.If these trends are final, it is going to adversely impact the JD(S) and Congress government, which completes one year in office on May 23. Ironically, the oath-taking ceremony of HD Kumaraswamy had become a platform for all the opposition parties to display their unity of strength against Narendra Modi’s BJP. With state BJP chief BS Yeddyurappa constantly claiming that 20 MLAs from the opposition parties are in touch with him and would join the BJP any time, the fate of the government might be in jeopardy and political pundits have already predicted that the alliance might fall soon.last_img read more

Kasautii Zindagii Kay 2 This how much Parth Erica Karan and others

first_imgKasautii Zindagii Kay 2instagramThe makers of Kasautii Zindagii Kay 2 have been successfully managing to keep the viewers hooked to their screens with dramatic twists and turns in the storyline. With such popularity, no wonder the cast has to put in extra effort and work round-the-clock. For this, they are paid a massive amount too.But ever wondered how much the actors charge to play the characters convincingly? Rumour has it that the actors, including Parth Samthaan, Erica Fernandes, Karan Singh Grover and others, charge a hefty fee and some are jaw-dropping. Take a look:Pooja Banerjee, who plays the role of Anurag’s sister Nivedita Basu, reportedly charges a big amount of about Rs 65,000 per episode.Parth Samthaan, who plays the male lead role of Anurag Basu, apparently takes home a massive sum of Rs 1 lakh per episode. His chemistry with lead actress Erica Fernandes is loved by millions. Pooja Banerjeeinstagram Parth SamthaaninstagramErica Fernandes, who essays the role of Prerna, has risen to stardom with Kasautii Zindagii Kay 2. She is the heart and soul of the show and is rumoured to be paid a whopping amount of Rs 1.2 lakh per episode.  Kasautii Zindagiii Kay 2 actress Erica FernandesinstagramKaran Singh Grover entered the show quite late but his role of Mr Bajaj and his chemistry with Prerna has grabbed a lot of limelight within a short span of time. Karan apparently demanded Rs 3 lakhs per episode, TellyChakkar reported. Besides this, he wanted to work for only 12 hours a day and 25 days in a month. Rumour has it that Ekta Kapoor was keen on bringing Karan on board and hence agreed to all his demands.  Karan Singh GroverTwitterHina Khan, who played the role of Komolika, is one of the big names of telly town. The actress reportedly charged a huge amount of approximately Rs 2 lakh till the time she was part of Kasautii Zindagii Kay 2. Hina had to quit the show due to her prior film commitments. Hina Khaninstagramlast_img read more

Workers clash with police over arrears in Ctg

first_imgJute mill workers blocked the Chittagong-Hathajari road at Amin Jute Mill area since 9:00am on Tuesday.They clashed with the members of law enforcing agencies over realising two months’ arrear wages.The blockade on the road continued till 2:00pm, creating a huge tailback.According to witnesses and police, about 300 workers of Amin Jute Mill blocked the road at 9:00am on Tuesday.They enforced the blockade on the road by setting fire to tyres and piling up logs. Vehicles came to a halt on both sides of the road.The workers clashed with the police, at one stage throwing stones when the police told them to remove the blockade.Officer in charge of Bayzid Bostami police station Abul Kalam said the workers blocked road in demand of two months’ arrears.”We are trying to convince them to remove the blockade,” the OC added.last_img read more

Man killed in Narail gunfight with cops

first_imgAn alleged criminal accused in 13 different cases was killed in a ‘gun battle’ involving police in Kararbil area in Narail municipality early Wednesday, reports UNB.The deceased was identified as Romman Hossain Romeo, 28, son of late Mizanur Rahman, resident of Madhurgati village in Sadar upazila.Being tipped off that a group of criminals were staying at the place, police conducted a drive to arrest them around 3:00am, said officer-in-charge of Narail Sadar police station.Sensing the presence of the law enforcers, according to the police, the culprits opened fire on the policemen, prompting them to retaliate.Romeo was found wounded at the scene after the gunfight. He was rushed to Narail Sadar Hospital, where doctors declared him dead, informed the OC, as well as that three policemen also got injured during the gunfight.A shotgun, two rounds of bullets and a magazine were recovered from the scene, the lw enforcement added.The law enforcement’s version of the event was, however, not verified independently as no version of the incident was available immediately either from any witnesses or from any members of the victims’ family.last_img read more

Gas cylinder blast at school compound kills 1

first_imgA destroyed rickshaw-van is seen at the Dhaka Education Board Laboratory School and College ground in Mirpur 1, Dhaka on Friday. Photo: Ashraful AlamA man was killed and several people, including students, were injured after a gas cylinder exploded at Dhaka Education Board Laboratory School and College compound in Mirpur 1 area of the capital on Friday morning.Deceased Siddique, 60, was a balloon vendor.Balloons scattered after the explosion at the Dhaka Education Board Laboratory School and College ground in Mirpur 1, Dhaka on Friday. Photo: Ashraful AlamWitnesses said Siddique was selling gas-filled balloons near a temporary platform set up for the annual sports competition at the school compound.At a stage, the gas cylinder went off with a big bang around 8:00am, leaving Siddique and several others injured.One of the several injured students of Dhaka Education Board Laboratory School and College ground in Mirpur 1, Dhaka on Friday. Photo: Ashraful AlamFatally injured Siddique was taken to Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College and Hospital where physicians declared him dead on arrival, said Selimuzzaman, officer-in-charge of Darus Salam police station.Wife of deceased balloon vendor cries at Shaheed Suhrawardy Medical College and Hospital in Dhaka on Friday. Photo: Zahidul KarimThe injured students were treated Delta Hospital, he added.last_img read more