Face Up Psychology Today

first_imgLevine opted for a simple green and black color palette so as not to distract from the cover image. An important consideration, however, was the model’s make up. “I gave the makeup artist instructions before the shoot, and said the ‘most important thing is that the model doesn’t look Halloween-ish, like Shrek, or like the Wicked Witch of the West from the Wizard of Oz.’”Achieving the shiny green glow required the makeup artist to combine green foundation with a binder to thicken it and apply shine over it, in addition to green lipstick. The green tongue was a product of Levine’s post-shoot Photoshop handywork. However, the constraints of a one-day shoot offered little time to experiment with alternative shades of green. While initially Psychology Today considered “making her [the cover model’s] eyes green to represent jealousy, as in the expression ‘green-eyed monster,’ it was actually distracting,” says Levine. The full-on green cover may be better suited to the expression “green with envy,” but, as Levine says, “envy and jealously are often confused.” The overarching goal was to ensure that the cover didn’t take on a synthetic quality. “We wanted it to have a natural feel,” he says. “Often, I try to create a poster impact, but as PT is a general interest magazine, we’re essentially selling the idea of being a person. I wanted to tie the cover to the gut emotion of jealousy.”DESIGNER’S COMMENTS “Visually, this is a very arresting cover. The image is bold, yet simple—the cover lines are catchy and easy to read. Even though the cover has a lot of information, it doesn’t feel cluttered to me, but informative. My only criticism is that the image seems to have little to do with the coverline. Yes, she’s green with envy (…not actually the same as jealousy…), but she looks like she’s proudly belting out the last note of a rock ballad. I don’t get a sense of the emotional confusion and spite that jealously brings out in a person. But, maybe I’m just envious.”Karen Player | Art Director | Harvard Business Review“As for the image, jealousy is the ‘green-eyed monster,’ not the Hulk. In order to convey jealousy, it would work to have her eyes open and green, and keeping her face ‘un-green.’ Eyes have a tendency to really attract people and draw them in, so having her eyes closed isn’t adding anything to the cover. Her crooked mouth is also kind of disconcerting. I do love the + and – signs that the art director uses; they really work graphically. I also really like most of the coverlines. One that could use some work is ‘5 Dating Shake-Ups for Singles,’ since I don’t know what a ‘shake-up’ is; also, the coverline ‘10 Laws of Great Art.’ I thought the point of art is that what’s good is subjective. The word ‘law’ is also jarring. I would space the left side coverline “What A Kiss Can Tell You” to read: What/A Kiss/Can/Tell/You.”Thea Selby | Principal | Next Steps Marketing, Inc. MAGSTATSIssue: August 2009Frequency: Bi-monthly Launched: 1967Circ: 307,000Publishing Company: Sussex Publishers, LLCEditor-in-Chief: Kaja PerinaArt Director: Ed Levine Photographer: Andrew Eccles Capturing a facial expression to represent the theme of an issue isn’t as easy at it looks. New York’s January 21-29, 2008 double issue, “Peace + Quiet,” featured an outline-less woman’s face with eyes closed, exuding relaxation and escape; more recently, Esquire’s 2009 commemorative issue featured the ‘Hope’ headshot of a pensive Barack Obama that read “What Now?”For Psychology Today’s August cover, art director Ed Levine wanted to use an iconic image, “something that was strong graphically and emotionally,” to convey the cover story “Jealousy: Why It’s Really About You.”last_img read more

9 automotive design trends that need to die and soon

first_img 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better More about 2019 Audi A6 Premium 45 TFSI quattro 22 Car Industry Audi More From Roadshow 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger valuecenter_img Cars of the 1950s had their chrome. Vehicles from the ’80s were boxy. In the ’90s, everything got a little melty, like a candy bar left out in the sun. Whatever the decade, specific design trends proliferate across the entire auto industry.But they aren’t all good. Sure, today’s cars are really pushing the styling envelope, but that’s also leading to a number of questionable choices. Here are the modern automotive design trends that need to die, and soon.Light-up badgesI spend every day being assaulted by #brands. The last thing I need is a street full of cars, shouting their names at me in the night. Expressive design should work by itself. We don’t need to get hit over the head repeatedly by the badge. Plus, it invites higher repair costs when its driver inevitably gets distracted on Tinder and smashes into the pickup truck ahead of ’em.– Andrew KrokEnlarge ImageAh, the Mercedes illuminated star. It created a monster. Mercedes-Benz Massive grilles that are mostly closed offIt’s subjectively bad enough that automotive designers are locked in a weird arms race for the biggest grille, but then you get close and realize that, often, more than half of that grille is blocked off because there’s really no practical reason for a grocery-getter to have such a massive maw.– Antuan Goodwin2019 Toyota AvalonEnlarge ImageA vast majority of the Toyota Avalon’s huge grille is nonfunctional. Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow Fake ventsWhile performance affectations are almost kind of understandable on humble everyday cars, they’re particularly infuriating on high-performance automobiles. This trend amounts to bra or trouser stuffing, and it’s wholly unnecessary when a car still has “the goods.”– Chris PaukertLong-Term 2018 Kia Stinger GTEnlarge ImageThe Kia Stinger is a formidable performance car — but we hate its fake vents. Steven Ewing/Roadshow Jewel headlightsWhy are designers inspired by arachnids? When I look at a car I don’t want to be looking at a spider. Multiple light cubes in the housing are just design for design’s sake.– Emme HallAcura MDX PMC EditionEnlarge ImageMy, Acura MDX, what overly fancy headlights you have. Steven Pham/Roadshow Fake exhaust tipsThere are some slick-looking exhaust tips on cars these days, but the problem is that a lot of them aren’t real. In many cases it’s just a fancy outlet molded into the rear bumper with a regular round pipe behind it like on the Mercedes-AMG CLA45. And sometimes there’s not even a cutout at all, such as on the 2019 Audi A6. It’s just disappointing to see and it looks cheap.– Jon Wong2019-audi-a6-69Enlarge ImageThe outlets on this Audi A6? All fake. Jon Wong/Roadshow Asymmetrical wheelsIt’s great to have wild wheel designs, but when the wheels end up facing opposite directions on opposite sides of a car, it irks me no end.– Jake Holmes2018 Volkswagen Golf REnlarge ImageWe love the Volkswagen Golf R, but hate its asymmetrical wheels. Volkswagen Floating roofsThis is a stupid bit of design language because it interrupts the eye moving over a car. It’s unforgivable on any car, whether it’s a Nissan Murano or the otherwise gorgeous Aston Martin DB11.– Kyle Hyatt2019 Nissan MuranoEnlarge ImageNissan is doing the floating roof thing more than any other automaker. Emme Hall/Roadshow Coupe-oversAs far as I’m concerned, the word “coupe” is exclusively reserved for vehicles with two-doors — though I’ll make exceptions for the small suicide doors on the Mazda RX-8 and late ’90s and early 2000s Saturn SC. “Four-door coupe?” No. It’s called a sedan. But “coupe crossover?” Like, no. That’s not a thing.But beyond the inherent ugliness and pointlessness of these vehicles, I hate that automakers actually charge more for them than their equivalent, traditionally shaped brethren. You pay more to get less. And your car looks stupid.– Steven Ewing2020 Mercedes-Benz GLC CoupeEnlarge ImageIf it has four doors, it’s not a coupe. Mercedes-Benz Excessively low-profile tiresListen, I too love the look of a tire that’s barely thicker than a rubber band and has been stretched over the edge of a wheel large enough to qualify as an automotive caricature. I agree that it adds a lot of visual presence. But, spend a few minutes crossing a bumpy road on a wheel-and-tire package like that, and then do it again with something offering a higher rubber-to-metal ratio, and you’ll see that not every SUV on the road needs to be rolling on 22s wrapped with low-profile tires. Leave that to the supercars and go with something a little more practical on your next ride.– Tim StevensVolvo V90 R-DesignEnlarge ImageVolvo V90 R-Design: Great look, harsh ride. Volvo Originally published May 26, 2018. Preview • Tags Aston Martin Audi Kia Mazda Mercedes-Benz Nissan Toyota Volkswagen Volvo Acura Comments Share your voicelast_img read more