9 automotive design trends that need to die and soon

first_img 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better More about 2019 Audi A6 Premium 45 TFSI quattro 22 Car Industry Audi More From Roadshow 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger valuecenter_img Cars of the 1950s had their chrome. Vehicles from the ’80s were boxy. In the ’90s, everything got a little melty, like a candy bar left out in the sun. Whatever the decade, specific design trends proliferate across the entire auto industry.But they aren’t all good. Sure, today’s cars are really pushing the styling envelope, but that’s also leading to a number of questionable choices. Here are the modern automotive design trends that need to die, and soon.Light-up badgesI spend every day being assaulted by #brands. The last thing I need is a street full of cars, shouting their names at me in the night. Expressive design should work by itself. We don’t need to get hit over the head repeatedly by the badge. Plus, it invites higher repair costs when its driver inevitably gets distracted on Tinder and smashes into the pickup truck ahead of ’em.– Andrew KrokEnlarge ImageAh, the Mercedes illuminated star. It created a monster. Mercedes-Benz Massive grilles that are mostly closed offIt’s subjectively bad enough that automotive designers are locked in a weird arms race for the biggest grille, but then you get close and realize that, often, more than half of that grille is blocked off because there’s really no practical reason for a grocery-getter to have such a massive maw.– Antuan Goodwin2019 Toyota AvalonEnlarge ImageA vast majority of the Toyota Avalon’s huge grille is nonfunctional. Antuan Goodwin/Roadshow Fake ventsWhile performance affectations are almost kind of understandable on humble everyday cars, they’re particularly infuriating on high-performance automobiles. This trend amounts to bra or trouser stuffing, and it’s wholly unnecessary when a car still has “the goods.”– Chris PaukertLong-Term 2018 Kia Stinger GTEnlarge ImageThe Kia Stinger is a formidable performance car — but we hate its fake vents. Steven Ewing/Roadshow Jewel headlightsWhy are designers inspired by arachnids? When I look at a car I don’t want to be looking at a spider. Multiple light cubes in the housing are just design for design’s sake.– Emme HallAcura MDX PMC EditionEnlarge ImageMy, Acura MDX, what overly fancy headlights you have. Steven Pham/Roadshow Fake exhaust tipsThere are some slick-looking exhaust tips on cars these days, but the problem is that a lot of them aren’t real. In many cases it’s just a fancy outlet molded into the rear bumper with a regular round pipe behind it like on the Mercedes-AMG CLA45. And sometimes there’s not even a cutout at all, such as on the 2019 Audi A6. It’s just disappointing to see and it looks cheap.– Jon Wong2019-audi-a6-69Enlarge ImageThe outlets on this Audi A6? All fake. Jon Wong/Roadshow Asymmetrical wheelsIt’s great to have wild wheel designs, but when the wheels end up facing opposite directions on opposite sides of a car, it irks me no end.– Jake Holmes2018 Volkswagen Golf REnlarge ImageWe love the Volkswagen Golf R, but hate its asymmetrical wheels. Volkswagen Floating roofsThis is a stupid bit of design language because it interrupts the eye moving over a car. It’s unforgivable on any car, whether it’s a Nissan Murano or the otherwise gorgeous Aston Martin DB11.– Kyle Hyatt2019 Nissan MuranoEnlarge ImageNissan is doing the floating roof thing more than any other automaker. Emme Hall/Roadshow Coupe-oversAs far as I’m concerned, the word “coupe” is exclusively reserved for vehicles with two-doors — though I’ll make exceptions for the small suicide doors on the Mazda RX-8 and late ’90s and early 2000s Saturn SC. “Four-door coupe?” No. It’s called a sedan. But “coupe crossover?” Like, no. That’s not a thing.But beyond the inherent ugliness and pointlessness of these vehicles, I hate that automakers actually charge more for them than their equivalent, traditionally shaped brethren. You pay more to get less. And your car looks stupid.– Steven Ewing2020 Mercedes-Benz GLC CoupeEnlarge ImageIf it has four doors, it’s not a coupe. Mercedes-Benz Excessively low-profile tiresListen, I too love the look of a tire that’s barely thicker than a rubber band and has been stretched over the edge of a wheel large enough to qualify as an automotive caricature. I agree that it adds a lot of visual presence. But, spend a few minutes crossing a bumpy road on a wheel-and-tire package like that, and then do it again with something offering a higher rubber-to-metal ratio, and you’ll see that not every SUV on the road needs to be rolling on 22s wrapped with low-profile tires. Leave that to the supercars and go with something a little more practical on your next ride.– Tim StevensVolvo V90 R-DesignEnlarge ImageVolvo V90 R-Design: Great look, harsh ride. Volvo Originally published May 26, 2018. Preview • Tags Aston Martin Audi Kia Mazda Mercedes-Benz Nissan Toyota Volkswagen Volvo Acura Comments Share your voicelast_img read more

Economist suggests humans are still evolving

first_img Increased marrying, and mating, by education level not affecting genetic make-up Citation: Economist suggests humans are still evolving (2016, July 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-economist-humans-evolving.html © 2016 Phys.org Credit: CC0 Public Domain As Beauchamp notes, many in the scientific community have come to believe that humans stopped evolving approximately 40,000 years ago—shortly after the advent of agriculture. But he notes there is also evidence that refutes such claims, such as studies that have shown that people developed an ability to digest milk and to live at high altitudes much more recently. To learn more, he conducted an analysis of records on 20,000 people he obtained from the Health and Retirement Study, which has compiled data on people born between the years 1931 and 1953. He chose this group because the vast majority of them were past child-bearing age—thus he was able to calculate a rLRS for each of them. Besides counting how many children they had, he also looked at body mass index, schizophrenia, age of onset of menstruation and education level—all traits that have genetic roots.After studying the data, Beauchamp found evidence of evolution in two phenotypes—a slight uptick in the age of first menstruation and a trend toward a lower rLRS for people who had more education—conversely, people with less education had more kids and thus more opportunity to pass on their genes.But, as Beauchamp acknowledges, his study was based on a very limited dataset, and it was constricted in that it left out the possible children that might have been born to the people in the database who died before growing old, for example. There is also an issue with the increased age of first menstruation, as recent studies have shown that it is actually going down, not up. And there is evidence that even if evolution is still at work, it appears that it is being overridden by our ability to control so many factors of our lives, such as saving people who would have died a natural death, or artificial fertility measures for educated people who have children later in life. More information: Jonathan P. Beauchamp. Genetic evidence for natural selection in humans in the contemporary United States, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2016). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1600398113AbstractRecent findings from molecular genetics now make it possible to test directly for natural selection by analyzing whether genetic variants associated with various phenotypes have been under selection. I leverage these findings to construct polygenic scores that use individuals’ genotypes to predict their body mass index, educational attainment (EA), glucose concentration, height, schizophrenia, total cholesterol, and (in females) age at menarche. I then examine associations between these scores and fitness to test whether natural selection has been occurring. My study sample includes individuals of European ancestry born between 1931 and 1953 who participated in the Health and Retirement Study, a representative study of the US population. My results imply that natural selection has been slowly favoring lower EA in both females and males, and are suggestive that natural selection may have favored a higher age at menarche in females. For EA, my estimates imply a rate of selection of about −1.5 mo of education per generation (which pales in comparison with the increases in EA observed in contemporary times). Although they cannot be projected over more than one generation, my results provide additional evidence that humans are still evolving—albeit slowly, especially compared with the rapid changes that have occurred over the past few generations due to cultural and environmental factors.center_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org)—Harvard economist Jonathan Beauchamp has conducted a study of lifetime reproductive success (rLRS) of a small segment of the U.S. population and has concluded that there is evidence that humans are still evolving. In his paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, he describes the study he conducted, his results and why he believes we are still evolving despite our control over our environment. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore furtherlast_img read more

Education dept to bid farewell to waiting lists adopt online declaration of

first_imgKolkata: The state Education department is all set to introduce online procedure for declaration of vacancies and will also do away with the existing system of publication of waiting list.”We have gone through all School Service Commission (SSC) related documents. We are ushering in change in the SSC rules with the aim to have more transparency in the system. The schools would upload their vacancies online and the School Education department would allot teachers accordingly. This system would do away with the role of district inspectors, who presently forward the schools’ vacancy lists to the department,” said state Education minister Partha Chatterjee at the state Assembly, after placing the Budget for School Education and Higher Education department for 2019-20. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataDuring his budget speech, Chatterjee said that his department has proposed a revision in the rules of SSC and Teachers’ Eligibility Test (TET) for transparency and fast-tracking of teachers’ recruitment. Chatterjee said in the Assembly that if things go as per plans, the rules will come into effect before the next SSC examination. The proposed revised SSC rule has been sent for Cabinet approval and is expected to be introduced from the next examination onwards. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateAccording to the minister, the selection of candidates would be carried out through the process of elimination and the department would publish only the list of selected candidates. “There is no reason for publishing any waiting list,” he told reporters in his chamber later. For a vacancy of 10 teaching posts, the merit list would now include the names of exactly 10 candidates. At present, the names of 14 candidates are published against 10 vacant posts. The minister maintained that his department has already rationalised the teacher-student ratio in Dooars and in three remote islands in Sunderbans. “We will also give protection to in-service teachers,” he added. Chatterjee pointed out that in 2011, there were 1,09,794 primary teachers and in 2019, the figure has gone up to 2,16,381. In the upper primary level, there were 1,16,051 teachers in 2011 and in 2019, there are 1,13,936 teachers, while another 14,000 will be recruited soon. He further said that guest lecturers will get weightage in the College Service Commission examination, if they are eligible under the UGC norms. There are 2,500 guest lecturers that have been recruited by the managing committees of colleges without the state government’s permission. Out of these guest lecturers, 40 percent qualify the UGC eligibility norms.last_img read more

Smart Money How Artificial Intelligence Will Transform Wealth Management

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Register Now » September 10, 2018 Rather than making it obsolete, artificial intelligence appears poised to revitalize the wealth management sector, ensuring that customers can rest easy knowing they are getting the benefit of fresh insights and streamlined processes. Far from taking the human element out of wealth management, it’ll let us personalize services even better, streamlining complex processes and making the business of handling clients’ wealth more effective and profitable for all.Related: Artificial Intelligence Is Likely to Make a Career in Finance, Medicine or Law a Lot Less LucrativeThere’s a reason a tech giant like IBM and its Watson AI are dipping their toes into wealth management — our field has a great deal of improvement at our fingertips, the kind that’ll lead to greater returns for both ourselves and our clients. While the full suite of services wealth managers offer will never be as simple as pushing a few buttons, those of us knee-deep in the complexities of wealth management work are about to get a valuable new tool. Here’s a look at just how AI will be changing the wealth management business in the coming years.Data analysisConsulting giant Deloitte named big data one of the biggest potential disruptors in wealth management, and it’s hard not to agree with that assessment. While we’ve always been able to draw on detailed information about our customers before, the massive amount of info we can now pull from is unprecedented and is sure to change wealth management for good. Thanks to AI’s enhanced data analysis capability, wealth managers will be able to design strategies that take a greater number of factors into account, informed by a deep dive into all the valuable data our software has been able to gather. Soon, catering plans to client’s every specification and pinpointing solutions with incredible accuracy will be a wholesale expectation for the job, not a nice bonus enjoyed only by the biggest firms.Related: 5 Reasons Machine Learning Is the Future of MarketingSupercharged investmentAlgorithms have already transformed the investment sphere, allowing investment firms and wealth managers to make huge numbers of transactions without lifting a finger. If these pre-programmed trades were the baby steps toward a smarter investment strategy, AI represents a full-on Usain Bolt sprint. Artificial intelligence-based investing gives money managers their own ultra-capable (and fast) research assistant, and as the technology evolves they’ll only get smarter. Analyzing past performances, adjusting portfolios on the fly, and presenting new streams of opportunity are just the beginning for AI investing strategies. When you’re in charge of a client’s future, you want to give them the best of your abilities. With AI, you’ll be doing that and more.Accounting precisionTomorrow’s wealth manager will be able to pass off the most tedious and repetitive accounting tasks to AI. The time savings alone are enough to get excited about, but it’s the reliability of artificial intelligence in making these crucial calculations that’s the real game changer. Needle-in-a-haystack accounting errors way well become a thing of the past, something that should come as a major relief to the money management sector. Not every accounting mistake leads to unmitigated disaster, but it’s a great weight off your shoulders to know there’s a technology-based solution to simple carelessness and mistakes. While nobody’s perfect, AI will help us get ever closer to that ideal.Related: Top 10 Best Chatbot Platform Tools to Build Chatbots for Your BusinessThe limits of AIWhile AI certainly represents a big step forward, it’s important to remember what it can’t yet do. Rest assured that smart machines won’t be completely eliminating the human element of wealth management (for now), but providing a powerful supplement to the work we already do. Jumping into AI is a great idea right now, but before putting all our eggs into this one basket it’s crucial to take note of the shortcomings of AI when it comes to the most important aspect of wealth management.When people put their signature on a wealth management agreement, a great deal of trust goes along with it. Anyone with some experience in this sector knows how important the human element is, that people need to buy into you personally just as much as they’re buying into your investment and accounting strategies. While AI is a powerful piece of software, it’s still just that: lines of code in a computer. It won’t be able to build relationships the way a personable manager can, or summarize complicated concepts in a way that only comes from experience. The talented wealth manager of today isn’t in danger of being replaced by AI, only supplemented by it.What this means for wealth managers of the near future is that tech-savvy will no longer be optional. The sooner we get used to this revolution, the faster we’ll be able to save time for ourselves and money for our clients. A complete understanding of what AI tools can and cannot do will be a necessary part of the job description. Essentially, we’ll be getting more time to focus on the big picture: And that means getting the best value for the people who entrust us with their lives’ earnings.AI isn’t a magic box that we can put all our problems into and spit out money, but it’s a tool more powerful than any we’ve seen before. When we can wield this exciting new tech tool intelligently and responsibly, wealth managers of all stripes stand to get a lot more done, for themselves and for their clients. For anyone hoping to succeed in this fast-moving industry, that’s something to celebrate. 5 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Globallast_img read more