Tesla finally launches Model 3 key fob for 150 but with a

first_imgSource: Charge Forward We knew it has been coming for months, but it is now finally here: Tesla is now launching its Model 3 key fob for $150.Though the device comes with a big drawback. It doesn’t have “passive entry”. more…The post Tesla finally launches Model 3 key fob for $150 but with a big drawback appeared first on Electrek.last_img

InDepth Look At Rivians History Funding Present

first_imgRivian Automotive has been at it since 2009, was chosen as one of the top growing companies in the EV segment, and already has a functional factory … so what’s the story?As we’ve previously reported, Rivian has been working as a covert operation for quite some time. Back in 2009, RJ Scaringe followed his dreams and started the soon-to-be electric car entrant. He completed his studies at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Sloan Automotive Laboratory, completing a Masters degree, as well as a PhD in mechanical engineering. His focus is on improving manufacturing technologies and promoting innovation in the segment.More Rivian News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 26, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Rivian R1T Electric Pickup Truck Shocks World In LA Debut Rivian R1T Electric Pickup Truck Shocks World In LA Debut It Seems Rivian R1T Truck Houses A 2170 Double Stack Battery Pack See The Rivian R1T In More Detail Here HistoryRivian Automotive is currently working out of a headquarters in Livonia, Michigan (Image Credit: Rivian)The company began its journey in Florida, under the name Avera Motors, but has since relocated its corporate headquarters to Livonia, Michigan and taken on the new moniker. The company had early plans to release a vehicle with industry-leading fuel efficiency around 2013 or 2014. However, with a new focus on electric vehicles, and the recent acquisition of a fully functional factory, the timeline has changed.When Rivian (Avera) first started to move forward in Florida, Tesla was essentially the only electric automaker making any waves. It’s not surprising the RJ chose to mirror some of the Silicon Valley automaker’s steps. Rivian acquired the former Mitsubishi Plant in Normal, Illinois and is in the process of readying it for production by 2019.There’s no official word as to whether or not the Livonia headquarters will be relocated, but the company chose it as an ideal location due to its proximity to suppliers and to Detroit’s automotive focus. Rivian also has a San Francisco location, which is focusing on the “tech” side of things. It’s said to be working on autonomous vehicles development and testing in California, among other engineering pursuits.FundingSince Rivian continues to operate in somewhat of a stealth mode, very little verified information is available. The company has not shared anything with the media in regards to funding, other than the fact that it is being handled. However, a person close to the company shared:“They have substantial liquid assets. They are well-positioned financially.”Two of the most notable pieces of the puzzle — which help to secure a startup’s success — are real estate (in this case a working factory, as well as multiple functional locations) and funding. These are two pieces that seem to be missing from most other EV startups, and seem to be solidified for Rivian.Rivian had about 100 employees at the end of 2016 and increased these numbers by 28 percent as of June 2017.Present & FutureThe outlook is increasingly encouraging and it would be fantastic to see another successful EV startup enter the segment. Having such an automaker near Detroit, and separated from the EV activity in California, is also positive as the segment seeks to gain a foothold across geographic markets.Flip forward to today, with the big reveal of the Rivian R1T electric truck and the whole electric car world now seems shocked. Truth is, Rivian is old. What’s new here is that now the automaker in on the map. And in a big, big way.And guess what? Tomorrow holds yet another EV shocker from Rivian. Stay tuned.More Rivian News It Seems Rivian R1T Truck Houses A 2170 Double Stack Battery Pack Source: NextMobility via Teslarati, Rivian See The Rivian R1T In More Detail Here Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

eMotorWerks LO3 Energy Partner On Energy Trading For Electric Cars

first_img What Happens When You Stalk A Tesla Supercharger For A Day? Electrify America To Open First California Fast Charger In Torrance ChargePoint CEO On Tesla Superchargers & The Future Of EV Charging So, why is this important? Well, eMotorWerks says that by shifting when and how much electricity their JuiceNet-enabled stations draw from the grid, they help utilities and grid operators reduce electricity costs, ease grid congestion, and maximize the use of solar and wind power. This makes electric vehicles less expensive to own, and reduces the impact they have on the environment. It’s important to realize that EVs, while cleaner than conventionally-powered vehicles, are still only as clean as the source of energy used to charge them. We think partnerships like this between industry stakeholders will help acellerate EV adoption across the globe.From the press release:The project will connect eMotorWerks’ JuiceNet EV charging platform to LO3’s energy platform Exergy, activating the trading of local renewable energy between EV owners and local energy marketplaces The aim is to test grid balancing use cases that combine demand from charging EVs with the local supply of green, affordable energy San Carlos, CA — December 5th, 2018 — eMotorWerks, a subsidiary of the Enel Group’s new advanced energy services business line Enel X, and LO3 Energy, an innovative company that facilitates local energy marketplaces through advanced digital services, have launched a partnership to use JuiceNet’s smart-grid control technology for a series of microgrid + EVs projects with the joint goal of exploring high-value use cases for local energy markets. An initial project will connect the JuiceNet EV charging platform to one of LO3’s transactive energy marketplaces, activating local renewable energy to be traded between the microgrid and electric vehicle owners. LO3’s Exergy platform underpins the data exchange that enables price signals and peer-to-peer transactions while the eMotorWerks JuiceNet platform enables control over local energy flows, matching in real time and in small groups the local demand from EVs and households with the local supply of green, affordable energy. “Beyond offering JuiceNet technology as a way for residents to manage charging more efficiently, projects such as our virtual battery in California, and now this partnership with LO3, showcase how powerful smart charging can be for grid services at scales ranging from hyper-local to state and national levels,” said Vincent Schachter, Senior Vice President, Energy Services of eMotorWerks. “We are looking forward to showcasing how JuiceNet can integrate with LO3’s platform to make local transactions smarter, quicker and more useful for future services.”LO3 Energy and eMotorWerks view this project as a key component of a broad service portfolio for utilities, giving consumers a choice in how they consume energy. This includes when and what type of resources are used to charge EVs, as well as when and how EVs can be leveraged as energy resources for local grid balancing through demand response. The targets of this program are price-responsive consumers with a flexible charging schedule who would like to leverage EV flexibility to save on their energy bills, or EV fleet managers who want to ensure predictable charging costs. In today’s increasingly decentralized energy environment, utilities and grid operators are  facing increased challenges to ensure a reliable, balanced and clean electric grid. Local energy trading platforms are taking a foothold as a scalable and cost-effective way to enable flexibility management.“As utility business models adapt from evolving regulations and competition, new products and services supporting EVs allow utilities to amplify and reinvigorate their direct customer relationship,” said Lawrence Orsini, CEO of LO3 Energy, “EV charging adds another option to efficiently match local energy supply and demand, and such project’s results could open the door to more transactions among other microgrid participants and EV drivers.” eMotorWerks’ JuiceNet platform allows users to remotely monitor and schedule their EV charging for the most cost-effective times of the day and earn rewards for providing a variety of energy services, both locally and through energy markets. JuiceNet also allows users to schedule EV charging when surplus electricity from the local, domestic, solar rooftop system is available for grid export or at times when high levels of renewable energy generation are available. When integrated into a community microgrid, these functions can become a part of the transactive energy solution for maximizing choice for energy consumers. Source: Electric Vehicle News Partnership promises to make EVs cleaner & less expensive to chargeeMotorWerks, makers of the popular line of  JuiceBox charging stations, has been very busy lately forming partnerships with various stakeholders in the electricity supply-chain. The latest partnership forged is with New York-based LO3 Energy, developers of blockchain-based tools and projects to support and accelerate the proliferation of distributed energy.More Charger News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 5, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Volkswagen ID Hatch Rendered To Life

first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News The ID should compete primarily with the Nissan Leaf and Hyundai Ioniq, but also with electric SUVs such as Hyundai Kona electric, Kia e-Niro and Kia e-Soul. And perhaps, especially with the 600-km version of autonomy, even with the Tesla Model 3. Produced in Zwickau since the end of 2019, the ID will be launched at the end of 2019 or early 2020. Volkswagen I.D. Prototype Tested In South Africa: Videos Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 23, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News We show you the rendering of the new VW electric car built on the MEB platformVolkswagen is already testing the prototypes of the new electric car called ID. (VW recently omits the second point in the name known so far, ID). Currently, the tests have already begun (with the internal name Neo) in South Africa and there are already official images of the car: an opportunity to let our illustrator realize a rendering. And to take stock of what we know so far about this zero-emission Volkswagen. Will we see it in 2019? Here are all the news coming soon.More VW I.D. News Three versionsIn the front, our rendering image shows some more air intakes than the concept, while the headlights look more conventional, as do the doors. The wheels look aerodynamically sophisticated as in the prototype, and there is a large windscreen and narrow taillights. Not much is known yet on the ID, but there should be three versions:-Base, with 48 kWh battery and 330 km range (WLTP)-Middle, with a range of 450 km and more power-Top, with a range of 600 km and more kWGolf dimensionsLooking at the adversaries, the basic version could have 150 hp (like the Nissan Leaf), while the top of the range could be 200 hp (like the Kona). Id. it should have an integrated 7.2 or 11-kilowatt charger and a DC fast charge connection with 125 kW power. The size of the ID. they should be similar to those of Golf. The technical basis is the modular electric platform (MEB). But the step, of 2.83 meters, is longer than that of a Passat of today: that the aims of the ID. are they going to compete in a higher segment? Inside, the ID will probably have a few buttons, a large touch screen and a new voice recognition, without forgetting the small display behind the steering wheel. Volkswagen I.D. Hatchback First Drive By Fully Charged: Video Volkswagen I.D. Hatch Spotted Testinglast_img read more

Nissans Supplier AESC To Build 20 GWh Battery Factory In China

first_imgAESC to increase production capacity from 7.5 GWh to 27.5 GWh annuallyAutomotive Energy Supply Corporation (AESC), Nissan‘s subsidiary recently sold* to Envision Group, is going to more than triple its lithium-ion cell manufacturing capacity.* according to Bloomberg, Nissan still holds about 20% stake in AESC.Under the new Chinese owner, AESC intends to build 20 GWh battery factory in Wuxi, China, which could supply 400,000 all-electric cars per year (averaging 50 kWh pack per car). Production could start within 1-2 years, right in time for next-generation Nissan BEVs.AESC news AESC already have three battery manufacturing sites with a total output of around 7.5 GWh:battery manufacturing operations in Smyrna, Tennessee, owned by Nissan North America Inc. (NNA)battery manufacturing operations in Sunderland, England, owned by Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd. (NMUK)Nissan’s Japanese battery development and production engineering operations located in Oppama, Atsugi and ZamaThe new total output would increase to 27.5 GWh per year when the new investment is completed.Current,ly AESC’s batteries are used mostly/only by the Nissan (a small part was also used by Renault, which however mostly relies on LG Chem).AESC supplies the cells for both the 40 kWh and new 62 kWh packs used by Nissan in LEAF, but is also open to supply other manufacturers.Source: Bloomberg Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on April 20, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News Nissan To Sell Battery Division To Envision Group Source: Electric Vehicle News Nissan Confirms Sale Of Battery Business To Envision Group Nissan Denies Report Of LEAF e+ Battery Cells From LG Chemlast_img read more

Jaguar targets Tesla owners in advert for IPace makes bold comparison with

first_imgJaguar has been targeting Tesla owners with mailer adverts in which the automaker makes a bold comparison between the I-Pace and the Tesla Model X. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Jaguar targets Tesla owners in advert for I-Pace, makes bold comparison with Model X appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

New improved mouse model could revolutionize bone metastasis research

first_imgJul 30 2018Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology propose an improved mouse model that could revolutionize bone metastasis research. Their method, which involves injecting cancer cells via the so-called caudal artery in the mouse tail, overcomes many limitations of traditional mouse models. The new model could thus open a new chapter in the development of therapeutic strategies for bone metastasis and cancer progression.In a study published in Nature Communications, a group of researchers led by Takahiro Kuchimaru and Shinae Kondoh of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) present a mouse model that could greatly improve understanding of the underlying biology of bone metastasis.It is widely known that metastasis — the spread of cancer cells from a primary tumor to other parts of the body — is one of the main causes of cancer mortality in humans. Bone metastasis commonly occurs when cancer cells spread to the bone from tumors originating, for example, in the prostate, breast, lung and kidney.Experimental mouse models provide vital clues as to how cancer cells proliferate and how treatments could be developed. For the last 20 years, a model based on intracardiac (IC) injection has been considered the “gold standard” for inducing bone metastasis. This model involves injecting cancer cells directly into the left ventricle of the mouse heart. It requires a high degree of technical expertise, and even when performed successfully, the number of cancer cells that can be injected at any one time is limited. Another drawback is that the IC model tends to be more suitable for studying cancer cell lines that have a relatively high metastatic ability, ruling out analysis of “weaker” cancer cell lines.Related StoriesStudy discusses beneficial effects of antibody therapy that targets sclerostinCommon antibacterial agent may be bad news for bone healthStudy reveals dual effects of new osteoporosis therapy on bone tissueIn contrast, the new method developed by Kondoh’s group involves injecting cancer cells via the caudal artery (CA) in the mouse tail — a procedure that can be performed much more easily as the artery is visible on the body surface. (See Figures 1 and 2.) This method allows researchers to inject a larger number of cancer cells without causing acute death: In the present study, around one million cells were injected without any acute death. Moreover, the new method provides a new way of studying cancer cell lines with low bone metastatic potential.The researchers emphasize that the CA model predominantly ensures that bone metastasis develops in the hind limbs with much higher efficiency.Using bioluminescence (BL) imaging, the team was able to detect bone metastasis just five to twelve days after CA injection of all cell lines examined.”Overall, the results demonstrated that CA injection provides a reliable method to develop bone metastasis by increasing the delivery efficiency of a wide variety of cancer cell lines to the bone marrow of the hind limbs in mice,” they say.In addition, the CA model enables scientists to monitor the progression of bone metastasis over a longer period of time compared with the IC model due to reduced incidence of lethal metastasis in other organs. This represents a big step forward for investigating cancer cell dormancy and reactivation in greater depth.The researchers conclude: “Our model may open a new avenue for understanding the bone metastatic processes and development of drugs preventing bone metastasis and recurrence.” Source:https://www.titech.ac.jp/english/last_img read more

Study finds traces of marijuana in breast milk up to six days

first_img Source:https://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/marijuana_found_in_breast_milk_up_to_six_days_after_use Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 27 2018With the legalization of marijuana in several states, increased use for both medicinal and recreational purposes has been documented in pregnant and breastfeeding women. Although national organizations like the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend that breastfeeding mothers do not use marijuana, there has been a lack of specific data to support health or neurodevelopmental concerns in infants as a result of exposure to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or other components of marijuana via breast milk.To better understand how much marijuana or constituent compounds actually get into breast milk and how long it remains, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine conducted a study, publishing online August 27 in Pediatrics.Fifty-four samples from 50 women who used marijuana either daily, weekly or sporadically -; with inhalation being the primary method of intake –; were examined. Researchers detected THC, the primary psychoactive component of marijuana, in 63 percent of the breast milk samples for up to six days after the mother’s last reported use.”Pediatricians are often put into a challenging situation when a breastfeeding mother asks about the safety of marijuana use. We don’t have strong, published data to support advising against use of marijuana while breastfeeding, and if women feel they have to choose, we run the risk of them deciding to stop breastfeeding -; something we know is hugely beneficial for both mom and baby,” said Christina Chambers, PhD, MPH, principal investigator of the study, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at UC San Diego School of Medicine and director of clinical research at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego.The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for up to six months. Early breastfeeding is associated with a reduced risk of obesity, asthma and sudden infant death syndrome and with improved immune health and performance on intelligence tests. In mothers, breastfeeding has been associated with lower risks for breast and uterine cancer and type 2 diabetes.Related StoriesPre-pregnancy maternal obesity may affect growth of breastfeeding infantsType 1 diabetes symptoms are not recognized early enough among children in QuebecStudy: Mothers’ breast milk can provide protection against infection that lasts for lifeCannabinoids -; marijuana’s active compounds, such as THC -; like to bind to fat molecules, which are abundant in breast milk. This stickiness has suggested that, in women who use marijuana, these compounds can end up in breast milk, raising concerns about their potential effects on nursing babies.”We found that the amount of THC that the infant could potentially ingest from breast milk was relatively low, but we still don’t know enough about the drug to say whether or not there is a concern for the infant at any dose, or if there is a safe dosing level,” said Chambers, co-director of the Center for Better Beginnings at UC San Diego. “The ingredients in marijuana products that are available today are thought to be much more potent than products available 20 or 30 years ago.”The samples of breast milk used for the study were obtained from mothers who joined the Mommy’s Milk Human Milk Research Biorepository at UC San Diego, a program that focuses on looking at the numerous benefits of breast milk at the molecular level. Chambers and her research team collaborated with Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UC San Diego to measure the levels of marijuana in the samples.Chambers said the results are a stepping stone for future research. More studies need to be done, not only to determine the long-term impact of marijuana in breast milk for children, but more specifically: “Are there any differences in effects of marijuana in breast milk for a two-month-old versus a 12-month-old, and is it different if the mother smokes versus eats the cannabis? These are critical areas where we need answers as we continue to promote breast milk as the premium in nutrition for infants.”last_img read more

New US drone rules get positive reviews from researchers

first_imgNew U.S. rules on drone operations are getting a general thumbs up from researchers who rely on the unmanned aircraft to collect data and make observations. That marks a shift from a few years ago, when worried researchers went to court to block Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) drone regulations that they argued were overly restrictive and would harm academic science.The final FAA rule, released by the White House on Tuesday, seems to have alleviated many of those concerns. (You can read all 624 pages of the final rule here). The new regulations are “fantastic, just late,” says biogeographer Benjamin Heumann of Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant, who uses drones to map biodiversity and invasive species and had been critical of early versions. “It’s nice to have the FAA come forward with some new rules that kind of follow some common sense. … This is where we should have been 2 years ago.”The new rules outline how people can legally operate what are officially known as small unmanned aircraft systems (sUASs), defined as drones that are fewer than 25 kilograms and operate at 160 kilometers per hour or less. In general, they forbid operators from flying the aircraft over people who are not participating in their operations, and above 122 meters in altitude. Flights must be conducted during the daytime and the aircraft has to remain within the pilot’s line of sight. And drone pilots must be at least 16 years old and take an online test to earn a government permit known as a remote pilot airman certificate. Students or research team members who don’t hold such a certificate can fly a drone if they are under the direct supervision of someone who holds a certificate. The final rule has been years in the making. This past February, FAA issued a draft for public comment and received more than 4600 public comments, including many from universities, individual researchers, and scientific societies.Many of those commenters had been critical of earlier FAA efforts to regulate drones, which the agency worries pose a growing threat to commercial aviation and privacy. But many researchers said FAA’s approach was preventing them from fully exploiting a valuable new tool that has a wide range of uses, from surveying archaeological sites to observing weather, fires, and wildlife.One prominent critic was engineer Paul Voss of Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. In 2014, he coordinated a protest letter to FAA signed by nearly 30 researchers that raised a number of concerns. It noted, for instance, that FAA considered researchers who wanted to fly drones as “commercial operators,” meaning they needed a pilot’s license in order to fly even small drones, and had to apply to FAA on a case-by-case basis to get permission for each project. Such cumbersome rules created an “undue burden” for researchers, says Voss, and even led some, including Voss, to terminate the use of drones in their research.As a result of such concerns, in 2014 the Council on Governmental Relations—a Washington, D.C.–based group that represents 188 research universities—filed a lawsuit against FAA to challenge existing drone rules. And two allied associations—the Association of American Universities and the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, both based in Washington, D.C.—presented a letter to White House officials, arguing that university researchers needed a “timely, workable mechanism … to secure FAA approval to conduct important research and instructional activities utilizing sUAS technology.”The Obama administration appears to have responded to that request in crafting the new rule, Voss and other researchers say. “It’s a good step forward,” he says, adding that it may even prompt him to start using drones again.One change that has pleased many researchers is that researchers at private institutions are now treated the same as those working at public schools; previously, FAA authorization to operate drones for research was available only to researchers affiliated with public colleges or universities. Another welcome change, researchers say, is an FAA decision to drop special rules for drones carrying a payload, such a camera or scientific instrument, so long as it is “securely attached” and doesn’t interfere with flight. And FAA has said it will create an online portal to make it easier for researchers and others to request special waivers to the rules for unusual projects.The new rule will take effect in August. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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The space snowman at the edge of our solar system is actually

first_imgBecause the two lobes aren’t spheres, their height, width, and depth can be seen as three distinct axes, and all three axes of the lobes are nearly perfectly aligned, as if they had been laid end-on-end like dominos. This type of alignment would be expected if the duo formerly orbited each other in close proximity, their gravity gently tugging back and forth. “It’s very improbable this would arise completely by chance,” McKinnon says.The new images support a newer theory of planetary formation, called the streaming instability, as Science reported in January. Fifteen years ago, scientists proposed that boulder-size “pebbles,” built up through static electricity, would clump together like a pack of racing cyclists thanks to the churn of the early solar system’s primordial disk. Those streaming pebbles would eventually gravitationally collapse into planetesimals, leading to pairs of orbiting objects that line up like MU69, McKinnon says. “That comes right out of the streaming instability model.” By Paul VoosenMar. 18, 2019 , 4:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) THE WOODLANDS, TEXAS—As data streamed down last month from NASA’s New Year’s flyby of MU69, the most distant planetary object ever explored (above), New Horizons mission scientists got a shock. Rather than the 35-kilometer-long space “snowman” they were expecting, angled images revealed a flatter—not fatter—version, like two lumpy pancakes smooshed together.“That took us by surprise,” said Alan Stern, the mission’s principal investigator and a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, today at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference here. “We’re looking at something wild and wooly and pristine.”Scientists believe MU69’s two lobes, with their sparse impact craters and generally smooth features, are primordial planetary building blocks called planetesimals. They still don’t understand why MU69’s two lobes did not form as spheres. But their flat shapes are now the best evidence that MU69, or “Ultima Thule” as the team has nicknamed it, first formed as two small, separate objects, says William McKinnon, a New Horizons team member and planetary scientist at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. “This is our strongest evidence that they really did start as an orbiting pair.” The space ‘snowman’ at the edge of our solar system is actually two lumpy pancakescenter_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Life thrives in Antarctic hot spots created by seal and penguin poop

first_img In the desolate Antarctic landscape, life is hard to come by—unless you’re near some seal and penguin poop. The nitrogen-rich feces enrich the soil and create hot spots with lots of biological diversity that can extend more than 1000 meters beyond the borders of penguin and seal colonies, according to a new study.Scientists trekked through fields of waste created by elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and Antarctic penguins, including gentoo (Pygoscelis papua), chinstrap (P. antarcticus, pictured), and Adélie penguins (P. adeliae). The team examined the soil and plants surrounding these colonies at three separate locations along the Antarctic peninsula. Where there are more seals and penguins—and more of their poop—there was more biodiversity in the land, the researchers report today in Current Biology.The feces partially evaporate as ammonia, which then can get blown more than 1000 meters inland by the wind and is absorbed into the soil, the scientists note. This ammonia then creates a cycle of nutrient enrichment: The nitrogen is consumed by plants and lichens, which in turn support an incredible number of invertebrates, including mites, springtails, and roundworms. In fact, the team identified millions of invertebrates per square meter of soil surrounding the seal and penguin colonies—up to eight times higher than the number found in other parts of the peninsula. Life thrives in Antarctic hot spots created by seal and penguin poop These findings offer scientists a stronger understanding of how life can thrive in the coldest place on Earth. Now, the big question is whether these biodiversity hot spots will create perfect breeding grounds for something else: invasive plant species that can threaten the future of these environments. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Stef Bokhorst By Helen SantoroMay. 9, 2019 , 11:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Sticky proteins could protect crops more safely than chemical pesticides

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Soy leafFungus Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe 5 nanometers Dan Ross/shutterstock.com By Erik StokstadApr. 25, 2019 , 12:10 PM Attaching a fluorescent protein to the anchor peptides showed that about 60% to 70% of the leaf remained covered with them, even after the plant was doused in a rain simulation chamber. These two anchor peptides also clung well to the leaves of barley, corn, blueberry, and other crops. Schwaneberg says they can be engineered to adhere more or less tightly, as desired.The next step was to attach an antimicrobial peptide to the anchor. The team chose dermaseptin, a peptide discovered years ago in the skin of tree frogs. Dermaseptin attacks a broad array of microbes, including bacteria and fungi, somehow rupturing their cell membranes. Conrath notes that pathogens are much less likely to evolve resistance—a problem with chemical pesticides—because it is difficult to change the basic structure of cell membranes.When tested on glass slides, the fused peptide was about as effective against soybean rust spores as chemical fungicides. But in lab tests on plants, the peptide reduced symptoms of rust by only about 30%. “It’s not enough,” says Emilio Montesinos, a plant pathologist and agronomist at the University of Girona in Spain. “If you want to extend these results for crop protection, you need to do much more work.” Conrath thinks a tactic already used by industry for other pesticides could yield more potent peptides: adding chemicals to distribute them evenly across leaves.He acknowledges that the peptides are only at the beginning of the pesticide development process, which can last a decade and cost $200 million on average. RWTH Aachen has patented the concept, and Conrath and Schwaneberg plan to start a company to pursue deals with large pesticide manufacturers. They will need help lowering the cost of making the peptides. One way—engineering microbes to produce the peptides themselves in industrial vats—can be tricky when the desired protein tends to kill the microbes that make it.Another question is safety. Dermaseptin would need to be evaluated for its possible toxicity to humans, as well as the accidental harm it could cause to beneficial insects, fungi, or microbes. “It’s broad-spectrum and it’s persistent, and that creates a regulatory concern,” says Roma Gwynn, who runs Rationale, a pesticide consultancy in Duns, U.K.Studies indicate that dermaseptin does not harm mammalian cells, and any residues could be removed by washing the plant product with enzymes. Microbes would likely break down peptides remaining in the fields, Conrath says.As for target pathogens, the team is already thinking beyond soybean rust. They have showed that dermaseptin-based peptides can help protect maize from the common fungus Colletotrichum graminicola. They also want to try attach ing the anchor peptide to Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt, a insect-killing microbial toxin widely used by organic farmers and engineered into transgenic crops.Before that, however, Conrath and Schwaneberg plan to outfit their anchors with tiny amounts of copper, commonly used by vineyards and organic farms to fight fungi and other pathogens. This fall, with a €1 million grant from Germany’s Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture, the team will test the approach in vineyards in southern Germany, which could reduce copper spraying and the runoff that contaminates soil. They’re hoping the idea will stick. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Waterproof protectionAn antimicrobial protein has been designed to stick to leaves in the rain. One part of the protein is anchored in leaf wax. The other ruptures membranes of fungal spores.{font-family:’Roboto Condensed’,’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-weight:bold;}{font-family:’Roboto Condensed’,’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-weight:bold;font-style:italic;}BOLDREGULARITALICBOLD ITALIC{font-family:’Roboto Condensed’,’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;}{font-family:’Roboto Condensed’,’Helvetica Neue’,Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;font-style:italic;}REPLACE {font-family:’RobotoCondensed-Bold’;} etc WITH: Sticky proteins could protect crops more safely than chemical pesticides (GRAPHIC) V. ALTOUNIAN/SCIENCE; (DATA) GAURAO DHOKE AND MEHDI DAVARI DOLATABADI/RWTH AACHEN UNIVERSITY Sticky molecules could help soybean plants fight off a fungus even when it rains. To make the new pesticide, plant pathologist Uwe Conrath and protein engineer Ulrich Schwaneberg of RWTH Aachen University in Germany teamed up. Schwaneberg specializes in the directed evolution of peptides—adding genes to microbes to produce them, for example, and relying on rounds of mutation and selection to develop strains that produce peptides with improved traits. He has created peptides that attach to slick surfaces such as polypropylene. The team found two that also anchor themselves onto soy leaves. Spore (not to scale)CellLeaf waxAnchorDermaseptin Many pesticides have an inherent weakness: The active ingredients don’t adhere well to the plants they protect. After the chemicals are sprayed onto crops, rain can wash them off into the soil and groundwater. Farmers must spray again and hope for dry weather.Now, researchers have devised a stickier approach to protecting plants, one that could be applied less frequently than chemical pesticides and might be less toxic. They have designed a molecule with two separate chains of amino acids, called peptides. One peptide embeds itself in the waxy surface of a leaf, holding tight in the rain; the other juts out like a spear to attack microbial pests. In a proof of concept published this month in Green Chemistry, lab tests showed the molecules lessened symptoms of soybean rust, a dreaded fungus that causes one of the world’s worst agricultural diseases.The peptides will face many challenges before they can reach the market. But plant pathologists say they could be a flexible new way to protect crops. “With the current scale of the soybean rust problem, and the rapid evolution of resistance against multiple fungicides, any addition to the toolbox would be welcome,” says Nichola Hawkins at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, U.K. Ralph Hückelhoven at the Technical University of Munich in Germany also considers the technique promising. “It opens a treasure box of solutions,” he says. “It’s a bit surprising that no one has done this before.”last_img read more

DSC holds successful Dress to Impress fashion show

first_imgShareTweetSharePinOn April 11th 2019, the Dominica State College successfully staged its first ever professional wear fashion show which was dubbed “Dress to Impress.”The show was well received by the student body and staff. The models showcased outfits in segments such as “From day to night” which featured work attire which can be used to transition to a night out, “Casual Fridays” which featured outfits which can be worn to work on a typical dress-down day like Friday and “Office chic” which featured classic corporate wear.A total of 12 models hit the runway during the fashion show.The outfits were sponsored by Ramon’s Clothing Store located at #9 Cork Street and Faithful Hands Clothing Store located at 48 Independence Street. Music was provided by DJ Remzz.The Student Affairs department of the DSC hopes to continue to engage students in activities geared toward their professional and personal development.The show was organized by Miss Ellena Bowers, Career Development Coordinator within the department.Some more pictures of the event can be seen below.last_img read more

2018 The Year In Review Part II

first_imgDecember 24, 2018 2018: The Year In Review, Part II By Linda Kor July         The Navajo County Board of Supervisors authorized School Superintendent Jalyn Gerlich to hire outside legal counsel to represent the Navajo-Gila County Schools and Libraries Technology Consortium after Cable One filedSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img

Egypt Militant attack during Eid prayers kills 8 policemen

first_img Al-Qaida accuses Egypt of killing ex-president Mohamed Morsi in jail By AP |El-arish | Updated: June 5, 2019 1:32:05 pm Related News The sale of King Tutankhamun’s 3,000-year-old statue restarts debate on whether ancient artefacts belong to their country of origin Egypt: Militant attack during Eid prayers kills 10 policemen Masked policemen stand alert in Egypt. The attack killed two officers and eight conscripts. (AP File Photo: Amr Nabil)At least eight policemen were killed in an attack by Islamic militants at a checkpoint in the restive northern part of the Sinai Peninsula, Egyptian security officials said. Five militants were also killed. Advertising Egypt detains opposition leader accusing him of anti-government plot 0 Comment(s) According to the officials, the attack took place as Muslims in the city of El-Arish were holding prayers marking the holiday of Eid-ul-Fitr, which follows the month of Ramadan, on Wednesday morning.The attack killed two officers and eight conscripts.No group has claimed responsibility for the attack immediately.The officials said that the militants attacked the checkpoint, seized an armored vehicle to make their getaway but a warplane chased them in the desert, killing at least five.The officials spoke on condition of anonymity as they were not authorized to talk to reporters.For years, Egypt has been battling with an Islamic State affiliate based in northern Sinai.last_img read more

Many made millions when incharge of JK forest see their bungalows in

first_img“There is no vendetta (against anyone). In its natural course, the way Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACB) is working now, we won’t let go big fishes. No one will be spared – whether he belongs to any party or however big he is. No one is big before the law. I am here. I am not going anywhere,” Malik told reporters after starting a plantation drive at Zabarwan hills here.The governor said several people, who worked in the Forest Department in the state, had accumulated millions of rupees by destroying forests.“See the bungalows in Vasant Vihar or Maharani Bagh in Delhi of those who worked in the Forest Department. I know several families who have made millions as they had the charge of Forests. The forests of Jammu and Kashmir have been destroyed painfully. They are our lungs and we are alive because of them,” he said. PDP founding member resigns from party, says it has ‘upended’ after Mufti’s death 2 Comment(s) Amid tight security, 14th batch of 5,210 pilgrims leave Jammu for Amarnath Congress’ Vikramaditya Singh lands in trouble for tweets on 1931 Kashmir agitation satya pal malik. jammu and kashmir governor, jammu and kashmir forests, jammu and kashmir corruption, jammu and kashmir Forest Department, jammu and kashmir forest corruption, jammu and kashmir g=forest officials, Anti-Corruption Bureau, ACB, Zabarwan hills, Vasant Vihar, Maharani Bagh, jammu and kashmir news, indian express Satya Pal Malik said there were places in Kashmir which had zero levels of pollution. (File/Express Photo by Praveen Jain)Jammu and Kashmir Governor S P Malik Monday said that those in charge of the state’s forests “have made millions” through dubious means and asserted that his administration will not spare anyone who indulged in corrupt practices. Related News Advertising Advertising He said there were places in Kashmir which had zero levels of pollution only because of the plantation.“We have to increase that and achieve the target of 50 lakh plants. And not just plant them, but we will guard them round the year. I will myself see if the one I planted is growing well. We will take measures for their protection,” he said.Malik said the people of Kashmir were by and large very good, but there had been a betrayal with them.“There has been a betrayal with them. They were not shown the right path and were not told the reality. If we all together take it towards the right path, then Kashmir will become the best state of the country,” he said. By PTI |Srinagar | Updated: July 8, 2019 4:21:00 pmlast_img read more

Taiwan president heads to Caribbean with US stops

first_imgTsai will also make what her government is calling “two-evening transit stops” in the United States.Taiwan does not have diplomatic ties with the United States, but the U.S. provides the self-governing island with military and other support. China objects to such support as an interference in what it considers its internal affairs.In the Caribbean, the delegation will promote sustainable development and look for business opportunities for Taiwanese companies, Tsai said.Taiwan split from China during a civil war that brought the Communist Party to power in 1949. The rival Nationalists set up a separate government in Taiwan, and Tsai has resisted Chinese pressure to re-unite the two. Taiwan president Tsai Ing-wen to visit US this month, angering China By AP |Taiwan | Published: July 11, 2019 4:27:14 pm Post Comment(s) Taiwan president heads to Caribbean with US stops FILE – Tsai Ing-wen (Billy H.C. Kwok/The New York Times)Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen departed Thursday for a four-country state visit to the Caribbean with stops in the United States on the way there and back. Advertising Her delegation is going to Haiti, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and St. Lucia on a 12-day trip. The island nations are among the few that recognize Taiwan instead of China.Tsai said that she wants to share the values of democracy and perseverance with Taiwan’s friends.“Our democracy has not come easily and now is facing the threat and technological penetration of foreign forces,” she said, in a veiled reference to China. Related News Strike by Taiwan air attendants halts flights for thousands Taiwan confirms request for US tanks, air defence systems Advertisinglast_img read more

Express Daily Briefing Pakistan opens airspace for Indian flights Indias progress on

first_img chandrayaan 2 launch, chandrayaan 2 launch delayed, chandrayaan 2 launch postponed, world cup final, england wins world cup, wimbledon finals, aadhaar card, tenancy act, maratha quota Top news on Tuesday morning.Dissenting voices in Govt: Surcharge on rich may well end up hurting investment  NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Animal underpasses on Maharashtra highway a life-saver, tigers regular usersA report by Wildlife Institute of India (WWI) scientist Bilal Habib and his team shows that over March, April and May, 17 different species of animals started using nine underpasses along with the 16-km patch of forest on the Maharashtra side of the NH-44 highway — including T1, a tiger from the Pench reserve.BJP MLA Surendra Singh: ‘Muslim men keep 50 women, have 1,050 kids’BJP MLA from Uttar Pradesh’s Ballia district, Surendra Singh, has triggered another controversy with his purported remarks on Muslim men. In a video being circulated on social media, he had said, “A Muslim man can keep 50 women and father 1,050 children. This is no tradition but an animalistic tendency. Naturally, if you have two, three or four children, that is not an issue.”And finally…In a first, doctors at AIIMS have completed the first phase of a herbal drug trial to treat superficial wounds. The drug, AYUSH C1 Oil, used by the tribal population to treat wounds, has been tried on 30 patients who visited AIIMS and were found to be effective. Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Advertising Top News NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Advertisingcenter_img In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Best Of Express In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief A section within the Central government is of the view that the Budget proposal slapping a higher surcharge on the super rich will have the “most deleterious” impact on investments in the country and discourage the inflow of high quality human capital that India was just beginning to attract. Sunny Verma, Anil Sasi reportClosed since Balakot airstrike, Pakistan opens its airspace for Indian flightsPakistan opened its airspace for all civilian traffic on Tuesday morning, news agency PTI reported. Post Balakot airstrike, Pakistan had kept only two of the 11 routes open, both of which passed through the southern region. The move is expected to give a major relief to Air India, which suffered a huge financial loss of around Rs 491 crore due to the closure By Express Web Desk | Published: July 16, 2019 8:51:41 am SIT detains Congress MLA Roshan Baig in IMA jewels ponzi scamThe special investigation team probing the multi-crore IMA Jewels ponzi scam in Karnataka detained Congress MLA Roshan Baig when he was about to board a chartered plane from the Bengaluru International Airport last night.Opinion: The greatest gameThe story of cricket’s most nerve-wracking game ever, the 2019 World Cup final, is destined to live forever. Team England with medals around their necks showcased the human capacity to move on from deeply disturbing trauma and rationalise setbacks as stepping stones on the way to dizzy heights.5G rollout: How far has India progressedIn February last year, Airtel and Huawei conducted a lab trial for 5G during which a user throughput of 3 Gbps was achieved. However, not much has moved since then. A committee of the telecom ministry recently cleared the proposal to allow Bharti Airtel, Vodafone Idea and Reliance Jio to conduct 5G spectrum trial from next month onwards for a period of three months. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Hassan Rouhani says Iran ready to talk to US if sanctions lifted

first_img Advertising Related News Advertising UK says seized Iranian oil tanker could be released US President Donald Trump’s administration says it is open to negotiations with Iran on a more far-reaching agreement on nuclear and security issues.But Iran has made any talks conditional on first being able to export as much oil as it did before the United States withdrew from the nuclear pact with world powers in May 2018.“We have always believed in talks … if they lift sanctions, end the imposed economic pressure and return to the deal, we are ready to hold talks with America today, right now and anywhere,” Rouhani said in his Sunday speech. Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook By Reuters |Dubai, Paris | Published: July 15, 2019 7:29:13 am The State Department did not respond to a request for comment on why Zarif had not been blacklisted, why he had been granted a visa and whether US officials might use his New York visit to have direct or indirect contacts. Iran nuclear deal, US iran trade tariff, US iran trade war, US Iran trade sanctions, US Iran trade deal In this photo released by an official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks in a ceremony at Imam Khomeini International Airport some 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of the capital Tehran, Iran, Tuesday, June 18, 2019.Iran is ready to hold talks with the United States if Washington lifts sanctions and returns to the 2015 nuclear deal it quit last year, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said in a televised speech on Sunday. British leaks say Donald Trump axed Iran deal to spite Obama Best Of Express In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Existing US sanctions have targeted Iran’s main foreign revenue stream from crude oil exports, which Trump in May moved to try to eliminate entirely.READ | US will not blacklist Iran’s foreign minister, for nowIn reaction, Tehran said it would scale back its commitments under the deal, under which it had agreed to curb its nuclear program in return for relief from US and other economic sanctions that had crippled its economy.‘CONSIDER POSSIBLE CONSEQUENCES’Defying a warning by the European parties to the pact to continue its full compliance, Tehran has amassed more low-enriched uranium than permitted and has started to enrich uranium above the 3.67% permitted by the agreement. More Explained Confrontations between Washington and Tehran have escalated, culminating in an aborted plan for US air strikes on Iran last month after Tehran downed a US drone. Trump called off the retaliatory US air strike at the last minute.Calling for dialogue among all to resume, France, Britain and Germany – parties to the 2015 pact – said on Sunday they were preoccupied by the escalation of tensions in the Gulf region and the risk the nuclear deal might fall apart.Iran, Iran US, US Iran, Hassan Rouhani, Hassan Rouhani Iran, Iran US sanctions, US Iran, Iran US relations, Donald Trump, Donald Trump Iran, Iran US news, Indian Express, World news In this photo released by the official website of the office of the Iranian Presidency, President Hassan Rouhani speaks in a meeting during his provincial tour to the North Khorasan, Iran, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Iranian Presidency Office via AP)“We believe that the time has come to act responsibly and to look for ways to stop the escalation of tension and resume dialogue,” they said in a joint statement that was released by the French president’s office.Despite calling for talks with Iranian leaders, Trump said on Wednesday that US sanctions on Iran would soon be increased “substantially”. With Iran deal teetering on brink, Europeans assess next steps “The risks are such that it is necessary for all stakeholders to pause, and consider the possible consequences of their actions,” France, Britain and Germany, which have been trying to salvage the pact by shielding Tehran’s economy from sanctions, said in their statement.Iranian clerical rulers have said that Tehran will further decrease its commitments if Europeans fail to fulfil their promises to guarantee Iran’s interests under the deal.The nuclear deal aimed to extend the amount of time it would theoretically take Iran to produce enough fissile material for an atomic bomb – so-called breakout time – from several months to a minimum of one year until 2025.Iran denies ever having considered developing atomic weapons.There have been two signs in the past week that the United States may be signaling greater openness to diplomacy.US officials told Reuters on Thursday that Washington had decided for now not to sanction Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif despite Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s June 24 statement he would be blacklisted that week.On Sunday, US officials said they had given Zarif a US visa to attend a U.N. meeting this week. Iran’s mission to the United Nations said he had arrived in New York. Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Katrina on its mind New Orleans keeps an anxious eye on Tropical

first_img Tropical Storm Barry nears New Orleans, raising flood threat Related News Post Comment(s) Advertising Water can come at you from multiple angles in a city surrounded by it. Joseph Thomas, 51, remembers how it came into his neighborhood last time.“We would not be talking about Katrina had the levees not broke,” he said, explaining that the disaster in 2005 happened because faulty levees and flood walls failed to hold back Hurricane Katrina’s surge coming in from the Gulf of Mexico.With Tropical Storm Barry expected to make landfall as a Category 1 hurricane early Saturday morning in south Louisiana, residents scrambled in preparation for what is likely to be one of the biggest tests of the city’s storm infrastructure since Katrina exposed major flaws in its flood defenses 14 summers ago. Advertising New Orleans Police: 2 killed, many injured in shooting hurricane katrina, tropical storm barry, tropical storm barry us, us tropical storm barry, us storm, us storm barry, us tropical storm, world news, Indian Express Ray Ingram, Shamar Brooks and Brandon Jones help load sand bags to distribute to elderly residents in Morgan City. (Bryan Thomas/The New York Times)(Written by Emily Lane, Beau Evans and Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs) Best Of Express center_img Mass shooting at New Orleans: 16 wounded as gunfight erupts between two gangs Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Now, with some $20 billion in federal, state and local money spent on upgrading the city’s storm defenses and drainage, the nervous attention is on the levees along the Mississippi River, which is expected to swell to historic highs Saturday, and on the dozens of massive pumps that the city relies on to flush water out of its streets.hurricane katrina, tropical storm barry, tropical storm barry us, us tropical storm barry, us storm, us storm barry, us tropical storm, world news, Indian Express Front Street with levees running along the Atchafalaya River in downtown Morgan City. (Bryan Thomas/The New York Times)“This is the first time in history a hurricane will strike Louisiana while the Mississippi River is in flood stage,” Gov. John Bel Edwards of Louisiana said Friday. A “huge portion of southern Louisiana” is at risk, he said.Edwards activated 3,000 members of the National Guard, 1,100 of whom were deployed to New Orleans, where there was a storm surge warning. Flood warnings were in effect for Lafayette and Baton Rouge.Rain, said city and state officials, will be the biggest threat from Barry. Up to 20 inches could fall in some places. Mayor LaToya Cantrell of New Orleans urged people to shelter in their homes beginning on Friday night. Ghassan Korban, executive director of New Orleans’ Sewerage and Water Board, cautioned Friday that the city “could have a repeat” of the widespread flooding seen earlier in the week, when a strong storm Wednesday dumped up to 9 inches of rain in some neighborhoods.Beyond the rain, officials with the Army Corps of Engineers will be closely watching the storm surge. As of Friday morning, the river level stood at just above 16 feet, close to the low point of 20 feet for some stretches of the levees. But a Corps spokesman said the river was not projected to rise higher than 19 feet. By New York Times |New Orleans | Updated: July 13, 2019 8:14:30 am NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home last_img read more