Reno rumble: One of Brisbane’s oldest homes brought back to life

first_imgThe original Paddington homestead known as ‘Rockbourne’ has been renovated.BEYOND its overgrown and tired facade, the 1870s farmhouse was a piece of Brisbane’s history waiting to be brought back to life.When the Barnes family first set eyes on ‘Rockbourne’ in 2004, they knew they had found something special.The property at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, is one of the original homesteads in the iconic Ithaca Precinct.RELATED: Extravagant home taken from dated to daringPerched on a huge 1480 sqm block, the north-facing, elevated home was ripe for renovation, so the Barnes’s embarked on a labour of love.BEFORE: The front of the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The front of the house after it was renovated.“What was most important to us was that we maintained the integrity and history of the home,” owner Michelle Barnes said.“We agreed we would not rush into getting everything done or compromise on quality construction and finishes.“Instead, we took the approach that we would renovate as we could afford it.”So, they met with an architect, an arborist, a landscape designer and a builder to first plan the overall vision.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:59Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:59 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen5 tips to find the perfect flip00:59BEFORE: The back of the property at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The back of the property is unrecognisable after the renovation.After six months of planning, the mission was clear: to rejuvenate the historical Queenslander by kitting it out with classic, yet modern amenities, while staying true to its grace and charm.They restored the traditional facade, 12 foot ceilings, timber floors, doors, stained glass panels and fireplace, but added modern touches to make it more entertainment-friendly.MORE: This is what you get for a lazy $3m“We love cooking and holding dinner parties for friends and family so having a large kitchen with plenty of benchspace, ovens and cooktops and storage plus a large dining area was a priority — as was the outdoor entertainment area with a barbecue and a pizza oven,” Ms Barnes said.“It’s a home with so many beautiful memories, both with our family and those who lived here before us.”BEFORE: The living room inside the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The living room after it was renovated.They installed a new kitchen, complete with butler’s pantry, Subzero fridge, Vintec wine fridges, marble benchtops, hand painted cabinetry and European appliances.The new dining room is accented by Spotted Gum finishes and adjoins a large living room.There are six bedrooms, including a master bedroom with a dressing room and ensuite.The three bathrooms are accented by marble finishes and hand-crafted cabinetry, with the main bathroom boasting a cast-iron clawfoot bath.Downstairs, there is a rumpus room, decorated in Crema Pacifica honed marble flooring and bifold doors.This space is also ideal for a teenager/guest retreat or potentially self-contained granny flat style accommodation.BEFORE: A glimpse of the kitchen inside the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The kitchen after it was renovated.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours agoOutside, the Barnes’s installed a 9m x 4.5m saltwater swimming pool, surrounded by trees and landscaped gardens.One of the statement features of the property is the state-of-the-art alfresco pavilion by the pool, which is perfect for gatherings and includes an outdoor cinema for movie nights.A block of land this size is a rarity in Paddington, and also accommodates a cosy firepit, vegetable gardens, citrus trees and a chicken coop.BEFORE: The original kitchen and dining area during the renovation.AFTER: The kitchen and dining area after the renovation.But the hidden hero of the home is a sunlit study with floor-to-ceiling library, opening onto the wrap-around balcony.“It’s the smallest of all the rooms, but is beautifully lit throughout the day,” Ms Barnes said. “Surrounded by my books, arranged in floor-to-ceiling shelves, I never tire of reading or working in the study.“It overlooks the vegetable gardens, down the veranda and out to the city and receives the most delightful breezes.”BEFORE: A downstairs rumpus room in the original house before the renovation.AFTER: The wine cellar in the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, after the reno.The property is being offered for sale by Tyson Clarke of Queensland Sotheby’s International Realty.RENO FACT CHECK:Time taken: 15 yearsTotal spend: Can’t put a price on itVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:20Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:20 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen6 Australian wow homes that have just sold01:20last_img read more

Spotted: AAL Fremantle Transports Two Giant Cyclone Vessels

first_imgSingapore-based breakbulk, project cargo and heavy lift shipping operator AAL recently completed the transportation of two giant “cyclone vessels” to Petronas’ USD 27 billion RAPID project in Malaysia on behalf of freight forwarder Oceansmart Global.Each measuring around 22 meters in length, 11 meters in width and weighing over 500 million tons, the two cyclone or “tertiary” vessels were loaded onto AAL Fremantle, one of AAL’s 19,000 dwt S-Class heavy lift vessels, in Mailiao, Taiwan.The cyclone vessels were loaded by using AAL Fremantle’s combined 700 million-ton cranes to safely lift and stow the cargo into one of its three giant, box-shaped holds and weather deck, respectively.The units were discharged in Tanjung Setapa ahead of their installation at Petronas’s refinery and petrochemical integrated development project (RAPID) in Pengerang, Southern Johor, Malaysia.Image Courtesy: AALlast_img read more

BigRoll Is Taking It a Step Further

first_img“BigRoll has delivered on its promises, we have grown from an ambitious newcomer to a reliable partner in the world of heavy marine transportation.” These are the words of Bauke van Gent, commercial manager of BigRoll, and together with project manager Bastian Bojko, he speaks about the involvement of BigRoll in Russia’s energy project on the Yamal Peninsula in the northwest of Siberia.A part of the immense project is the construction of the Yamal LNG plant. Because the area is very remote everything must be shipped in.“The project site is not only remote but also located in the arctic region which asked for specific challenges to be addressed. From the beginning of the preparation and during execution our people, both on the vessels and within the offices, have worked closely with our partners. We welcomed and encouraged open communication and flexibility with and towards our project partners. This has been the basis for an excellent execution,” says Bastian Bojko who has visited the project location several times.Largest building ever transported“Our vessels have delivered modules from Asia directly to the project site, the Northern Sea route has been a welcoming option for our client. During our voyages we have encountered and sailed through ice, our Finish Swedish 1A Ice Class has been tested successfully. Within these challenging arctic conditions BigRoll has delivered the largest building ever transported on a vessel. With a length of over 103 meters and a width over 43 meter this building has been shipped from China to the Yamal Peninsula,” says Bojko.BigRoll was formed when two renowned companies BigLift and RollDock saw a market opportunity and together formed a new company with a clear vision to serve and add value to projects such as the Yamal LNG project. The two managers emphasise that BigRoll is not a joint venture between the companies but a stand-alone company.ContractBigRoll contracted Cosco Dalian Shipyard to build four state-of-the-art MC-Class Module Carriers. A series of four identical deck carriers, offering reliability and flexibility to the projects and client served by BigRoll. The Finnish Swedish 1A Ice Class MC Class vessels are specifically designed for the marine transportation of major modules and equipment for large energy projects both on and offshore. With the construction progress of these vessels on full swing at the Dalian Shipyard, BigRoll started the conversations with Yamal to learn where they could be of assistance, which resulted in a contract award late 2015.“We got the trust of the client because of the solid reputations of BigLift and RollDock,” says Van Gent. After the first vessel, BigRoll Barentsz, was delivered in 2016 it went straight to work on the Yamal project, same applies for the BigRoll Bering delivered a few months thereafter.“With the first two vessels already serving, our client decided to add two more MC-Class vessels.”Completely flushOne of the features of the ships is the efficient fuel consumption. This is accomplished by a combination of efficient hull design and propulsion systems. The decks of the four vessels are completely flush and can be used over the full length and width.“In combination with the large ballast capacity, ice class, state-of-the-art systems on board, our ships are the best choice for heavy transport projects worldwide and in extreme cold areas,” project manager Bojko said.“The Yamal LNG project and our client have had great ambitions from the start, and executed on that level of ambition. As a young company our learning curve has been steep,” Van Gent commented.“BigRoll had and has the advantage to be fully supported by our two experienced parent companies, BigLift and RollDock. From the start we worked with a clear vision. That is to be respected for our performance and our people. We operate with a decision model that embraces our Core Values – Care, Open, Deliver, Explore – in full. It was a combination of factors that made it all possible,” Bauke and Bastian informed.Northwest SiberiaBecause of the valuable cargo and the extreme conditions at the Yamal Peninsula nothing can be left to chance.“Safety has top priority when you operate in the extreme conditions that you find in northwest Siberia,” Bastian Bojko said.“In the summer the sun does not set and in the winter it is dark all the time. The arctic ice conditions make it a different place indeed. Safety is a big issue because it is a vital part of the operational process. Preparations and constant care are key elements to ensure a high safety level, as out there, small incidents can have big consequences.”The relationship with the client is very important. “The complete market did not believe this could be done. BigRoll is proud to have been one of the partners serving the construction of the Yamal LNG project. The company believes that the close and open cooperation they had with the client contributed to a successful execution.”Operational adviceBojko shares that there was a lot of trust between BigRoll and the client. “This also means that the client takes our operational advice and experience very seriously, which provides an excellent platform for the execution of such complex project. Loading and discharging such massive structures on our vessels sometimes requires difficult on-the-spot decisions. With a strong working relationship between BigRoll and client, these decisions easily processed and operations continue safely and efficiently.”Dutch flagAll four deck carriers sail under the Dutch flag. “The Dutch have a great reputation when it comes to the heavy lift industry. I have been in this industry for a long time and you always find Dutch people and assets involved in these type of projects,” says Bojko, who is from Denmark, with a smile.“They are solution driven and have a lot of experience in this industry.”With the completion of the Yamal project in the third quarter of this year and all the experienced the company has gained serving this project, BigRoll is ready for the future.“We successfully served the Yamal Project. This new kid on the block is here to stay,” Van Gent concluded.This article was previously published in Maritime Holland edition #3 – 2017.last_img read more

Inpex starts up Ichthys LNG power plant

first_imgThe Inpex-operated Ichthys LNG project has initiated a start-up of gas turbine generators at the onshore power plant near Darwin, Australia.Inpex said on Friday that this milestone was a significant step towards power generation at the project’s onshore combined cycle power plant (CCPP).Ichthys project managing director, Louis Bon, said: “Initiating the safe start-up of the gas turbine generators (GTG) illustrates the strong commitment of the onshore team to overcome challenges and achieve our targets.“The combined cycle power plant uses gas and steam turbines together to produce up to 50 percent more electricity from the same amount of fuel compared with a traditional simple-cycle plant.”The waste heat from the gas turbines will be used to create steam for the nearby steam turbine system, which generates extra power. Ultimately powered by natural gas from the Ichthys Field, the CCPP will use a mix of five gas and three steam turbine generators to supply all the electricity requirements for onshore processing of LNG.The power plant has the capacity for up to 490 megawatts of electricity, which allows LNG processing trains to cool and liquefy natural gas.“With more than 50 per cent energy efficiency, the CCPP will provide energy efficiency well above the 30-35 per cent typically achieved by a standard industrial gas turbine open cycle power plant and will allow the project to use saved fuel gas to produce more LNG,” Bon added.Inpex said that, when fully operational, the Ichthys LNG project would have the capacity to produce up to 8.9 million tonnes per annum (Mta) of LNG, up to 1.65 million tonnes per annum (Mta) of liquefied petroleum gas, and 100,000 barrels of condensate a day (at peak).When it comes to offshore components of the Ichthys LNG project, the Ichthys Explorer central processing platform (CPF) was moored in the field in June while the Ichthys Venturer floating production, storage and offloading facility (FPSO) was moored about two months later, in late August.In addition, a naming ceremony for the Oceanic Breeze tanker that will be transporting 0.9 million tons of liquefied natural gas per year produced from Ichthys took place in late October at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ shipyard in Nagasaki. The Oceanic Breeze will join another tanker, the Pacific Breeze, in a fleet which will be chartered by Inpex to transport Ichthys-produced LNG.last_img read more

Rosneft spins drill bit offshore Vietnam

first_imgRussia’s Rosneft has kicked off drilling operations at a production well at the (Lan Do field) as part of Block 06.1 development, offshore Vietnam.The oil company has set the target depth of the well at about 1200 meters, with sea depth at the drilling site being around 160 meters.According to Rosneft, the Lan Do field has initial natural gas reserves of 23 billion cubic meters. To develop the field further, Rosneft plans to build subsea installations which will be connected to the Lan Tay platform in the block.Processed gas and natural gas liquid are delivered from the platform to the shore by the two-phase Nam Con Son pipeline that is 370 km long – the longest two-phase pipeline in South East Asia. Due to the two-phase technology gas and gas condensate are delivered to the onshore processing facility simultaneously.During the 2018 campaign in Vietnam, Rosneft is also looking to drill a sidetrack well, next to the previously drilled PLD-1P exploration well on Phong Lan Dai field (Wild Orchid) –  also located within Block 06.1. Target depth of the well is 1300 meters. As a result, the well will be reclassified as a production well.Japanese rig Rosneft discovered the Wild Orchid field in 2016, a project which saw Rosneft engaged as an operator of an international offshore drilling project for the first time. According to Rosneft, the field revealed commercial gas reserves of 3,4 billion cubic meters.” Offshore infrastructure objects are being constructed on Lan Tay platform in order to deliver gas and natural gas liquids from the Wild Orchid field, Rosneft said on Tuesday,” Rosneft said.Drilling on Lan Do and Phong Lan Dai will be carried out using the semi-submersible drilling rig Hakuryu-5, owned by the Japanese company Japan Drilling Co., Ltd (JDC).Rosneft is currently involved in gas and condensate production projects on two offshore Vietnam blocks and is also a participant of The Nam Con Son Pipeline project.Rosneft Vietnam B.V. owns 35% share in the Block 06.1, which contains three gas condensate fields – Lan Tai, Lan Do, and PLD (Wild Orchid). The fields are 370 km offshore in Nam Con Son basin. Sea depth in the areas reaches 190 meters. Initial gas reserves of the fields are about 69 billion cubic meters, according to data available on Rosneft’s website.last_img read more

MOL Takes Delivery of LNG Carrier, Inks 1st Transportation Service Deal with Uniper

first_imgJapanese shipping company Mitsui O.S.K. Lines (MOL) has unveiled its first transportation service contract with German utility company Uniper following the delivery of LNG Schneeweisschen, an LNG carrier.The 180,000 cbm newbuilding, jointly ordered by MOL and Itochu Corporation, was delivered by Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) and named at the Okpo shipyard in South Korea on July 31.Under the terms of the contract for several voyages, the ship will serve Uniper Global Commodities SE, 100% owned by one of the largest European gas and electricity companies, Uniper SE.The LNG Schneeweisschen features two new technologies — the slow-speed two-stroke engine (X-DF) which can run on natural gas, MGO and heavy fuel oil, and the Methane Refrigeration System-Full Re-liquefaction (MRS-F) which works with the X-DF engine to re-liquefy surplus boil-off gas, returning it as LNG to the cargo tank.Featuring a length of 297.9 meters and a width of 47.9 meters, the LNG carrier can reach a speed of 19.5 knots. Currently, LNG Schneeweisschen has a market value of USD 199.46 million, according to data provided by VesselsValue.last_img read more

Moody’s Reviews NYK for Rating Downgrade

first_imgThe Baa3 issuer rating of Japan’s shipping major Nippon Yusen Kabushiki Kaisha (NYK) has been placed on review for downgrade, according to Moody’s rating agency.“We expect NYK’s leverage will likely stay at its high level of above 7.0x for the next several years and surpass our downgrade trigger of 6.5x,” Motoki Yanase, a Vice President and Senior Credit Officer, said.Moody’s explained this debt/EBITDA leverage metric does not appear likely to improve materially without substantial efforts to reduce debt. Without debt reduction, the ratings agency forecasts NYK’s retained cash flow/net debt will stay around 10% compared to 11.9% during fiscal 2017 ended on March 31, 2018.Additionally, the merger of the containership businesses of NYK, Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, and Kawasaki Kisen Kaisha, which started operation in April 2018, is expected to realize some cost savings and margin improvements for the new entity, Ocean Network Express (ONE).“With the inception of ONE, NYK has deconsolidated its containership business. The deconsolidation of this long unprofitable business will temper NYK’s earnings volatility, though it will take time to bear out its effect on its credit metrics.”Moody’s expects that NYK, as the largest 38% shareholder of ONE, will remain exposed to the credit risks originating from the containership business. NYK expects that its revenue for the fiscal 2018, after the deconsolidation of the business, will decline by approximately 20%.The rating agency said that the review will focus on NYK’s plan to manage future debt, including how this could be managed with asset sales and vessel turnover in the next several years; the progress of the integration of the containership business under the new company and associated cost savings; and how the company’s other businesses – such as air cargo and bulk shipping, including energy and car carriers – will trend and help support NYK’s future profits.last_img read more

Eight Feeders in the Making for CNCo

first_imgThe China Navigation Company Pte. Ltd (CNCo), a wholly-owned ship owning and operating arm of the Swire Group, is set to expand its feeder fleet with eight newbuilds in the next two years.The ships are being built at the China State Shipbuilding Corporation’s Wenchong shipyard, starting delivery in 2019 and continuing into 2020.The initial four 2,400 TEU vessels were ordered from Huangpu Wenchong Shipbuilding in 2017 to replace tonnage that will be phased out between 2019 and 2020. The company subsequently declared options attached to this order for four more 2,750 TEU vessels which will be delivered in 2020.“China’s growth as a major player in the shipbuilding industry has truly been remarkable. The partnerships we have established with key Chinese shipbuilders is testimony of this growth,” James Woodrow, Managing Director of CNCo, said at the opening of the company headquarters in Shanghai, China, on November 5.“We will continue to assess modern and fuel-efficient designs to provide an industry-leading product to our customers in China far into the future.”“With our Shanghai office now being a full-fledged operating subsidiary as well as our other offices in Qingdao, Beijing and Guangzhou, we are even more confident of delivering innovative and sustainable shipping solutions that will meet the needs of our customers,” Randy Selvaratnam, country manager, added.Headquartered in Singapore, CNCo owns and manages more than 130 vessels through its three core divisions – Swire Shipping, Swire Bulk and Swire Bulk Logistics. Out of these, 37 ships have been built in China.The company offers four separate services from China covering the South Pacific Islands, New Zealand, and North Australia trades.last_img read more

Green light for Vigdis boosting station project

first_imgNorway’s Ministry of Petroleum and Energy has approved Equinor’s Vigdis boosting station project, which is located in the North Sea. Expected start-up is in the first quarter of 2021.Vigdis subsea installation. (Photo source Equinor Author André Osmundsen)The Equinor-operated Vigdis field is located in the Tampen area of ​​the North Sea. The field has been developed with seven subsea templates and produces oil and gas, which is then sent to the Snorre field for further export. It came on stream in 1997.Back in December 2018, Equinor decided to boost production at its subsea field Vigdis by almost 11 million barrels.The new project involves installing a pump on the seabed that helps increase recovery and accelerate production from the field, according to the ministry’s statement on Tuesday.“Increased recovery can create great values, and Vigdis is a good example of this. Now the field gets a new boost. With the Vigdis Boosting project, the recovery increases further and great values ​​are created for society,” says State Secretary Rikard Gaarder Knutsen.The boosting station will be connected to the pipeline to enhance the capacity between Vigdis and Snorre A, and will help bring the well stream from the subsea field up to the platform. Thanks to the boosting station wellhead pressure can also be reduced, which further increases production from the wells.In addition to the subsea boosting station the project will involve some modifications to Snorre A, which receives oil from the Vigdis field, and Snorre B, supplying the new boosting station with power from a new umbilical.“Vigdis has already produced twice what it thought was possible when the field was put into production. This project increases value creation from the field and gives new assignments to the supplier industry,” said Gaarder Knutsen.Spotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product or technology on Offshore Energy Today please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

SBM Offshore riding the FPSO renaissance wave

first_imgWhile the first hull under the Fast4Ward concept was ordered in 2017, the thinking about the program began five years ago when the company started pondering how it could do better, bring ways of working to new levels, and to make the business less dependent on market cycles.During our visit to China, we spoke with Bernard van Leggelo, SBM Offshore’s Managing Director of Strategic Growth to learn more about Fast4Ward.“There is a lot of noise in the market that Fast4Ward is just an orange box, but the orange box is just one element of the philosophy and approach of delivery faster to the client.”It may not be “just an orange box” but it is worth stressing that Fast4Ward’s box shape has its benefits over the traditional VLCC shape FPSO with a bow.According to SBM Offshore, the current box-shaped hull of the Fast4Ward hulls, rather than a ship-shaped one, provides extra deck space for topside modules, allows for lower modules, less congestion, less piping, is safer to operate as you don’t have to climb six stairs up and six stairs down to the work, and is quicker to build.Bow shape means less deck space. Given the fact that FPSO doesn’t have to move fast as it will spend most of its life on one or two locations, there’s no need for a bow, and no bow shape on Fast4Ward means 13 percent extra deck space vs traditional FPSOs converted from VLCCs.This further allows for more space on hull facilitates lowering the modules for better access for maintenance, while improving safety.Standard FPSOs have been built in the past, but “every one of those companies went bankrupt,” Van Leggelo said. First hull ready to sail away Announcing its first Fast4Ward hull order on speculation in 2017, SBM Offshore said it was cautiously optimistic about the improvement in the FPSO market, and that it believed that Fast4Ward would give it a major competitive advantage once the FPSO market picks up, as it will fast-track projects compared with the industry average and can cut CAPEX and OPEX costs while providing clients earlier access to oil.Fast forward (PUN INTENDED) to the end of 2019, SBM Offshore’s optimism has firmed up, as the company recently ordered its fourth and fifth Fast4Ward hulls – also in China, and according to a recent report by Rystad Energy, there may be a need for many more FPSOs in the coming years. More here.The firm contract for the first Fast4Ward FPSO ordered in 2017, was secured in May 2019, and while the FPSO has been developed for Brazilian and West African environmental conditions, it won’t be deployed in either of the two regions. ExxonMobil will use it for its Liza 2 development in Guyana.Come June 2019, SBM Offshore signed an LoI with Petrobras for the supply of an FPSO for the Mero 2 development in Brazil.In August, construction began on the third Fast4Ward hull, and in December 2019, SBM Offshore ordered two more units in China, meaning SBM Offshore currently has five hulls on order,.“I’ve been doing a few of these over the years, and this is quite historic, to be doing five FPSO hulls simultaneously. This has never been done before, by far,” SBM Offshore’s Managing Director Strategic Growth, Bernard van Leggelo, has recently said.This is especially the case when one takes into consideration that the company has been ordering them without a firm contract in place.Worth noting, the firm contract for the Mero 2 FPSO was signed earlier in December 2019 following an LoI with Petrobras. The hull is being built by China Merchants Industry Holdings (CMIH) shipyard in China, as the FPSO is set to be delivered in 2022. From one hull to five in 2 years If you read Offshore Energy Today, you could’ve read about each of these five FPSO hull orders, and you could’ve noticed that we’ve probably overused the artist’s impression of the Fast4Ward FPSO hulls showing three orange-box type units with various mooring types.We did this simply because there were no photos to share as the first hull was still under construction. However, Offshore Energy Today was recently in China aboard the Liza Unity FPSO hull and now we have photos.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>The hull of the first MPF – the Liza Unity – is basically fully complete, as the SWS workers had been finishing up painting works on it during our December visit.The Liza Unity FPSO hull is scheduled to leave the SWS Shanghai shipyard in January 2020, on its way to Singapore where the topsides will be mounted aboard ahead of the final sail away to Guyana. This will be SBM Offshore’s largest FPSO so far.It is designed to produce 220,000 barrels of oil per day, to have associated gas treatment capacity of 400 million cubic feet per day and water injection capacity of 250,000 barrels per day.The FPSO will be spread moored in a water depth of about 1,600 meters and will be able to store around 2 million barrels of crude oil. Not just an orange box In surfing, reading the environment and anticipating a wave from a small lump on the horizon can be difficult, but rewarding.This is what SBM Offshore, a Dutch-based FPSO industry specialist which has been building floating production units for 60 years, had done when after a rather dry period for FPSO orders it ordered an FPSO hull from China’s SWS Shipyard in July 2017.FPSO suppliers usually order a hull when they have a contract for it secured, however, this FPSO hull, the first under SBM Offshore’s trademark Fast4Ward program was ordered on speculation, without a firm contract in hand.SBM Offshore’s Fast4Ward program includes a generic hull based on Brazilian and West African environmental conditions, with the versatility to receive various large topsides with spread or turret mooring configurations.The FPSO developed this way, SBM has said, can speed up delivery of an FPSO by up to 12 months. For a typical project, this can boost value for a client by more than US$0.5 billion, materially lowering project break-even prices, SBM Offshore has said.This might be key to securing new contracts, as Rystad Energy recently said that while the future of the FPSO industry now looks bright after a few years of downturn, a key challenge going forward would be project execution and cost control. So, why is SBM Offshore different? “The key difference is looking at the standardization of the individual building blocks while maintaining flexibility as FPSO at the end is still quite a custom piece,” Van Leggelo said.So, with the MPF hull being one piece of the puzzle, the other piece SBM Offshore highlights as important is its catalog of the topsides and all the other pieces such as flare tower, helideck, cranes. It currently has about 70 entries for clients to choose from.Van Leggelo said: “The clients have seen the benefits of our standards and of our flexibility. We can move faster without the constraints of moving fast. Because if you make a standard FPSO, as people tried 15 years ago, allegedly it’s ready to go but it never fits what the client wants. Combined with all the experience we’ve had with the units, the clients really start to see a big value proposition of Fast4Ward.”What will prevent any other FPSO supplier from doing a similar thing?“Well, they’re four years behind us, Paula Farquharson-Blengino SBM Offshore’s Press Offices says, smiling, and according to a recent report by the FPSO Network, track record is one of the most important things when it comes to ordering an FPSO.By Bartolomej TomićSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more