Public hearings on Vermont permit process in October

first_imgDeb Markowitz, Secretary of the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, and Ron Shems, Chair of the Vermont Natural Resources Board, are holding public hearings in October on improving Vermont’s environmental and land use permitting processes. The purpose of the hearings is to hear from Vermonters about what works and what needs improvement in the ANR, Act 250 and municipal permitting and appeals processes. ‘It is important to hear from the public,’ said ANR Secretary Markowitz, ‘so we can address real issues people are experiencing in our environmental permitting process.’ Public input is sought on the following questions:How can each permit process best assure predictability and timeliness? How can each permit process best assure transparency and citizen input? What environmental permit processes can be consolidated? How can we avoid duplication in the permit process? How can we lower expenses in the permit process? Should the process be the same for a routine environmental permit (e.g., wastewater) as for a more complex permit (e.g., an Act 250 permit for a large project)? Are there other procedural issues in the environmental protection process to address?‘Our goal is to improve the permitting process where it needs fixing, without reducing environmental protection,’ said NRB Chair Ron Shems. Markowitz and Shems will be making recommendations to the Legislature in January 2012.The public hearings are being held around the state, as follows:Comments are also being accepted in writing and by email. For details, see: http://www.nrb.state.vt.us/news.htm(link is external) or contact Melanie Kehne at the Natural Resources Board at 802-828-3305.##last_img read more

By the numbers: Statistical comparisons between Syracuse and Johns Hopkins

first_imgSecond-seeded Syracuse (13-2, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) will take on Johns Hopkins (10-6, 4-1 Big Ten) in the NCAA tournament quarterfinals on Sunday at noon in Annapolis, Maryland. The two teams met once before this season, with Syracuse escaping at home in a 13-10 win over the Blue Jays on March 14. Here are several key statistics, explaining how the two teams stack up against each other heading into the do-or-die matchup this weekend. Faceoffs:JHU: 54 percentSyracuse: 66 percentJohns Hopkins head coach Dave Pietramala said there would be no way for his team to get into an offensive rhythm if SU’s Ben Williams does what everyone expects of him. The sophomore faceoff specialist won 16-of-27 faceoffs against the Blue Jays in the regular season matchup. It’s worth noting that Syracuse has been more effective at the X earlier in games, and as a result has taken 111 more shots than its opponents in the first half of games this year compared to just 43 in the second halves of games. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMan-up goals:JHU: 35 (47 percent)Syracuse: 29 (49 percent)Syracuse converted on two of its four man-up opportunities in its 20-8 win over Marist on Sunday. In the last three games, the Orange has converted on six man-up chances. As a team SU has drawn 16 more penalties than its opponents and 13 more minutes on the man-up. Johns Hopkins, on the other hand, has drawn 25 more penalties than its opponents with an extra 16 minutes within the advantage. Opponents shooting percentage:JHU: 30 percentSyracuse: 28 percentMuch like the Orange offense, the Syracuse defense is stocked with upperclassmen. Three of the four primary defenders are academic seniors while Jay McDermott is a junior. SU has dominated winning ground balls by a 519-363 clip this season, and that’s not all because of Williams. JHU only has a plus-23 margin on ground balls, but the defense has stepped it up at the right time, allowing fewer than 10 goals in the past three games. Goals per game: JHU: 13Syracuse: 15The Syracuse attack stacks up with anybody in the country, but Pietramala said it’s the Orange’s secondary options like Henry Schoonmaker, Nicky Galasso and Hakeem Lecky on the first-line midfield that make SU so dangerous. Those three have combined for 29 percent of the team’s scoring while the attacks are at 48 percent. John’s Hopkins’ scoring comes largely from Ryan Brown, who has 58 of the team’s 207 goals. No one else has more than 25 goals.Turnover margin: JHU: -8Syracuse: +11John Desko was asked what, if any, were his team’s weaknesses. He mentioned turnovers as something his group needs to work on, as the Orange has totaled 11 more turnovers than its opponents this season. More than 30 players on the roster have totaled at least one turnover. Johns Hopkins has actually turned the ball over eight more times than Syracuse, but has also collected 27 more turnovers from its opponents than SU.Goals against average:JHU: 10Syracuse: 9Bobby Wardwell has been a better goalie late in games than early on. He’s made 44 saves in the fourth quarters of games this year compared to just 27 in the first quarter. Eric Schneider for JHU has seen a marked difference later in the season. In the past five games he’s allowed 6.8 goals per game compared to 12.4 during a rough seven-game stretch early in the year. ESPN analyst Mark Dixon said neither goalkeeper is the best out there, but both do a good job giving their teams a shot to win. Comments Published on May 16, 2015 at 1:26 pm Contact Sam: sblum@syr.edu | @SamBlum3 Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more