Chelsea v Leicester line-ups: Terry decision, Blues trio injured, Foxes rotate

first_imgChelsea boss Antonio Conte has resisted the temptation to recall John Terry following his injury for the game with defending champions Leicester.Conte has made only one change from the side which beat Hull before the international break, keeping three at the back.Willian is on compassionate leave following the death of his mother, and Pedro comes in.Minor muscular injuries to Branislav Ivanovic, Cesc Fabregas and John Mikel Obi have ruled them out, with Ola Aina and Dominic Solanke on the bench.Oscar is not involved as he has flown to Brazil due to family illness.Leicester have made three changes from the side that drew 0-0 with Southampton, with the midweek Champions League tie in the back of their mind.Riyad Mahrez, Islam Slimani and Danny Simpson all drop to the bench, with Jeffrey Schlupp, Ahmed Musa and Luis Hernadez coming in.Chelsea: Courtois; Azpilicueta, Luiz, Cahill; Moses, Kante, Matic, Alonso; Pedro, Costa, Hazard.Subs: Begovic, Aina, Terry, Chalobah, Loftus-Cheek, Solanke, Batshuayi.Leicester: Schmeichel; Hernandez, Huth, Morgan, Fuchs; Albrighton, Drinkwater, Amartey, Schlupp; Musa, Vardy.Subs: Zieler, Simpson, King, Mahrez, Gray, Ulloa, Slimani. See also:Chelsea development side held by LeicesterChelsea v Leicester: five key battlesConte on Batshuayi, Hazard’s role, Leicester, Man Utd, Kante and three at the backFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Big Science Trying to Wipe Egg Off Its Face

first_img(Visited 578 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Science scandals and crises are reminding observers that scientific reliability is no more reliable than the people who make a living in science.Are palaeontologists naming too many species? (Science Daily). Human ego can get in the way of science. Paleontologists earn fame by having fossils named after them, so it’s tempting for them to “split” similar fossils into different species rather than to “lump” them together. Judy Massare (SUNY College at Brockport, New York) and Dean Lomax (U of Manchester) bring this problem to light in the case of naming extinct sea reptiles named ichthyosaurs (scientific jargon for “fish-lizards”). “After their latest research project,” this article says, “the pair urge caution in naming new fossil species on the basis of just a few fragmentary or isolated remains.” After studying the hind fins of one form of ichthyosaur, they realized that they could all be considered variations of a single species.Palaeontologists fall into one of two camps when it comes to naming species, ‘lumpers’ and ‘splitters’. The former ‘lump’ groups of similar specimens together, whereas the latter opt to split-up specimens and distinguish new species. However, in this new study, if the team opted to split-up the specimens based on the variation found, it would suggest a huge number of species.They remarked that splitters could have labeled these specimens as 19 different species! Splitting was a common practice before, misleading the public (and other scientists) about the amount of variation in nature. “This would be similar to what was done in the 19th Century when any new fossil find, from a new location or horizon, was named as a new species if it differed slightly from previously known specimens.” This implies that a moral failing 150 years old is still with today’s science. Will honest discussion of the problem be sufficient to stop fossil hunters from succumbing to the temptation for fame?The pre-registration revolution (PNAS). The scientific method was all worked out centuries ago, right? That’s what students are usually taught. Once again, though, any “method” is only going to be as reliable as the fallible human being who applies it. Part of the high school student’s understanding of “the scientific method” (actually, there is no one method) is to propose a hypothesis and then test it with experiments. But like a famous proverb not said by Yogi Berra, “In theory, there is no difference between practice and theory. In practice, there is.”This paper tries to wipe some egg off the faces of scientists who have violated the spirit of the scientific method by post-dicting their hypotheses instead of predicting them. It’s a bit like a false prophet watching something happen then proclaiming that he predicted it would happen. Some researchers are tempted to goof around with observations, watch what happens, and then propose a hypothesis after the fact. Lo and behold, the hypothesis was proved by testing! Only the scientist and the team may know.In this PNAS article, five commentators think that forcing scientists to publicly state a hypothesis before testing it (a policy called preregistration) might make science more credible.Progress in science relies in part on generating hypotheses with existing observations and testing hypotheses with new observations. This distinction between postdiction and prediction is appreciated conceptually but is not respected in practice. Mistaking generation of postdictions with testing of predictions reduces the credibility of research findings. However, ordinary biases in human reasoning, such as hindsight bias, make it hard to avoid this mistake. An effective solution is to define the research questions and analysis plan before observing the research outcomes—a process called preregistration. Preregistration distinguishes analyses and outcomes that result from predictions from those that result from postdictions. A variety of practical strategies are available to make the best possible use of preregistration in circumstances that fall short of the ideal application, such as when the data are preexisting. Services are now available for preregistration across all disciplines, facilitating a rapid increase in the practice. Widespread adoption of preregistration will increase distinctiveness between hypothesis generation and hypothesis testing and will improve the credibility of research findings.Cases where “data are preexisting” illustrate some of the challenges to making preregistration work. How can you test something that is already known? Many evolutionary explanations fall into this category. What can an evolutionist do with a fossil record that is fairly complete? Say that “my hypothesis is that a transitional form will be found in Texas in strata between the Carboniferous and Jurassic” or something like that? Even if Big Science comes up with “practical strategies” that work for all cases, those will only work if all scientists practice them. In practice, individual researchers have shown themselves to be creative at conniving to get around best practices, especially if fame or funding are at stake.Racist cover of National Geographic, August 2002, about the Dmanisi skull, portrayed to look primitive and dark-skinned.National Geographic acknowledges past racist coverage (Phys.org). Generations of adolescent boys can remember flipping through pages of National Geographic Magazine looking for photos of bare-bosomed “people of color,” but aside from whatever titillation they enjoyed, they were also getting a subliminal message: non-westerners were likely to be naked savages.National Geographic acknowledged on Monday that it covered the world through a racist lens for generations, with its magazine portrayals of bare-breasted women and naive brown-skinned tribesmen as savage, unsophisticated and unintelligent.“We had to own our story to move beyond it,” editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg told The Associated Press in an interview about the yellow-bordered magazine’s April issue, which is devoted to race.Former editors of the popular magazine tended to perpetuate clichés of white racial superiority through their photographs and descriptions of natives from non-western countries. They gave the impression that “people of color” tend to be “exotics, famously and frequently unclothed, happy hunters, noble savages”—common stereotypes from Darwin’s day, but highly politically incorrect these days. And yet to many readers, National Geographic Magazine was an authoritative source of science, popularizing science with vivid images and stories. Alongside the now-acknowledged racist content would be stories from the space program, the frontiers of physics, and biology. And who can forget the numerous cover stories on human evolution, with alleged pre-human ancestors commonly shown with dark skin?It is only proper for Goldberg to acknowledge past sins and strive to correct them. Yet the past sins were reflections of the culture of their time. What steps is Goldberg and the magazine taking to isolate their coverage from present sins and biases? Is that even possible? It’s easy to joke ‘National Gee—a Gaffe (ick!)’ now, but what will future moralizers say about current publications? NG still contains overwhelmingly biased coverage of Darwinian evolution. Not all that long ago, they did have to issue an apology (in fine print) for their cover story jumping to the conclusion that so-called Archaeoraptor was a transitional form between dinosaurs and birds. They continue to indulge in ‘historical racism’ by portraying ‘archaic humans’ as less evolved than themselves.Crisis or self-correction: Rethinking how the media cover science (Phys.org). This article tries to rehabilitate the image of science by the media. ‘Crisis? What crisis?’ gives the flavor. ‘It’s much ado about nothing.’ The media are inflating and over-generalizing a few cases, giving an impression that science is broken.The article, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and authored by Kathleen Hall Jamieson, director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, examines three media storylines used to describe the nature of scientific discovery. Jamieson writes that one of the narratives – that science is “in crisis” or “broken” – is especially concerning and may have been inadvertently encouraged by scientists’ efforts to find and correct problems in scientific practice.“This is troubling in part because defective narratives can enhance the capacity of partisans to discredit areas of science – including genetic engineering, vaccination, and climate change – containing findings that are ideologically uncongenial to them,” Jamieson writes. “In contrast, accurate narratives can increase public understanding not only of the nature of the discovery process, but also of the inevitability of false starts and occasional fraud.”The issue is important, Jamieson says, because the news media affect the extent to which we think about a subject and how we think about it, and misleading accounts about science can affect the public’s trust in science. The “science is broken” story has appeared in outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, The Atlantic, Vox and Slate.Actually, the “narratives” that science is broken or in crisis are often stated bluntly in leading journals such as PNAS, Science, and Nature (ex., 24 April 2016). The “reproducibility crisis” in psychology and a similar crisis in medical reporting concern large numbers of flawed papers, not just a few “false starts and occasional fraud.” These Big Science institutions are suggesting major revisions in thinking and important large initiatives to combat the problems. It’s especially telling that this article, coming from the University of Pennsylvania, “cites genetic engineering, vaccination and climate change” as potential victims of flawed narratives, when controversy about those subjects tends to track political party lines (as does evolution). The authors also repeat the myth that science is a “self-correcting process’ (see 8 Feb 2016, 24 April 2016, and 6 Jan 2018). National Geographic had to own up to its racism to begin to address it. In the same way, Big Science has to own up to its crises, not excuse them as mere “narratives.”Postpublication peer review: A crucial tool (Science). Another example to prove that the science crisis is not a mere ‘dust-up’ or exaggeration is found in Science, where Gregory Isaac Peterson advocates post-publication peer review as a solution to many problems with the current peer review system.The current peer-review model used throughout science is not perfect. Whether it be the result of poor experimental design, accident, or academic misconduct, publication of irreproducible, incorrect, or fabricated results occurs more frequently than it should [check Retraction Watch for recent examples]. This leads not only to a waste of precious time and financial resources as scientists try to replicate or build on flawed research but also to damage to the reputation of science and to much larger societal impacts (such as the loss of public trust in science and loss of federal funding).One reason Peterson gives for the disparity between the ideal and the real concerns human nature. “This disparity likely stems from the reality that overworked scientists do not have time for activities that provide little to no recognition.” The comment shows that scientists are not robots cranking out knowledge for its own sake. A human being’s desire for recognition cannot be ignored.Scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators (Phys.org). Guilty scientists don’t just hurt their own reputations; they hurt everyone who worked with them. The case of Viswat Jit Gupta (see commentary below) illustrates the point. Prof. Katrin Hussinger of the University of Luxembourg warns scientists that they must choose their collaborators carefully lest their own reputations suffer if someone is accused of misconduct later through “guilt by association.”“The results of the study are worrisome,” explained Prof. Hussinger. “Our research shows that guilt by association stretches back to projects prior to the fraud case and thereby to unsuspecting and uninvolved co-workers.“Another related worry, Hussinger points out, is that the fear of guilt by association could lead to under-reporting of fraud. “Knowing that they might be penalised for mere association might make researchers think twice before speaking out,” she says. Who knows, therefore, how much fraud is really going on? The solution cannot come from method or phenomena; it is a matter of personal moral choices. “Trust is a crucial aspect of communicating science and conveying research results to the public,” she says. “The ripple effects of one misconduct case can put at risk the reputation of a much larger group of scientists and even institutions.”How, exactly, did “trust” evolve, Dr. Hussinger? Nowhere is the reality of crisis better seen than in articles about Darwinian evolution. In his book Evolution’s Blunders, Frauds and Forgeries, Dr. Jerry Bergman documents dozens of unbelievable frauds—some of them recent—that fooled all the leading scientists of their day, not just laypeople who received “defective narratives” from the press. For instance, he shows how Professor Viswat Jit Gupta so messed up the field of Himalayan stratigraphy using fake fossils in the 1990’s to 2000’s that the field may never be able to clean up the mess (pp 78-81). In his last 25 years, he published some 300 papers in major journals, “all of which are now in doubt, as also are some of the numerous papers based, in part, on Gupta’s research.” Science often proceeds by citing papers. This dishonest individual planted fossils from museums in strata, lied about where they were found, and committed other acts of fraud. Because of one man’s misconduct, all his collaborators are also tainted. Gupta’s papers are not the only ones in doubt. How many scientists relied on his ‘research’ and cited his papers as trustworthy?Some frauds or just errors have escaped detection for decades, even centuries. Remember that Piltdown Man fooled the world’s experts for 40 years. National Geographic posted numerous cover stories about human evolution, particularly those about the work of Louis and Mary Leakey, for decades that are no longer believed. What current frauds and forgeries, yet to be revealed, are misleading scientists and the public about evolution? Evolutionists had better get out of the hoax of Darwinian evolution now. It has the potential for a colossal meltdown that may tarnish the reputation of science forever.last_img read more

Novice surfer masters a pro move: Punching a shark to escape

first_imgA British doctor who arrived in Australia two months ago to work, Fry said Tuesday he had recently watched a YouTube video in which Australian professional surfer Mick Fanning described his famous escape from a great white shark during a surfing competition in 2015.“So when it happened, I was like: ‘Just do what Mick did. Just punch it in the nose,’” Fry told Nine Network television. “So Mick, if you’re watching or listening, I owe you a beer. Thank you very much.”Fry, 25 and a surfing beginner, was in the water with three doctor friends when he was attacked off AvocaBeach, 90 kilometers (60 miles) north of SydneyFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I was out surfing and I got this massive thud on my right-hand side; it completely blindsided me,” Frysaid.“I thought it was a friend goofing around. I turned and I saw this shark come out of the water and breach its head,” he said. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC “So I just punched it in the face with my left hand and then managed to scramble back on my board, shout at me friends and luckily a wave came, so I just sort of surfed the wave in,” he added.Fry said he wasn’t conscious of his injured and bleeding arm until he reached the shore.“I didn’t really notice it at the time because when you’re surfing, all I’m thinking was: ‘I’m about to die. I’m literally about to die,’” Fry said.“So I thought … ‘get in as fast as possible, ride the wave for as long as you can and then just start paddling for your life,’” he added.Fry’s friends drove him to Gosford Hospital, where they all worked, to be treated. The beach was closed for 24 hours.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Lifeguards spotted the 3-meter (10-foot) shark that attacked Fry close to shore and would use drones on Tuesday to check that it had left the area, Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported.Fry said he could not return to the ocean for a week due to his injuries, but “after then, I’ll be racing to get back in.”Fanning was competing at the J-Bay Open in South Africa two years ago when he was knocked off his board by a shark yet escaped unscathed. The video of the attack and Fanning speaking about it has been viewed more than 24 million times on YouTube. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Trump hopes swift return of UCLA players detained in China Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments MOST READ CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA LATEST STORIES In this image made from video, surfer Charlie Fry is interviewed as he talks about being attacked by a shark at Avoca Beach, Australia, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017. Fry, a novice surfer, mastered a pro’s move on the first try: He punched a shark on the nose to escape its jaws. (Channel 9 Australia via AP)CANBERRA, Australia — A novice surfer mastered a pro’s move on the first try: He punched a shark on the nose to escape its jaws.The attack Monday afternoon off the Australian coast left Charlie Fry with superficial puncture wounds on his right shoulder and upper arm.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s weddinglast_img read more

20 days agoMan City boss Guardiola: Gallardo deserved FIFA nomination

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Man City boss Guardiola: Gallardo deserved FIFA nominationby Paul Vegas20 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester City boss Pep Guardiola is full of praise for Marcelo Gallardo.The River Plate coach is being linked with Ernesto Valverde’s job at Barcelona.And Pep told TNT: “What Gallardo has done with River is incredible, at the level of results, giving them consistency every year despite the fact that players leave and he continues to be … there are things that I cannot explain much, we are nominated as three coaches for the best of the year and he is not there. “It seems that there is only Europe, I do not understand how he is not nominated and not only for a year also for what he has done, I hope one day I can face one of his teams, it would be very nice.” last_img read more

Glenn invited to join Hispanic caucus in Lansing

first_img13Feb Glenn invited to join Hispanic caucus in Lansing Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Midland, left, and Michigan Legislative Hispanic Caucus chairman Rep. Harvey Santana, D-Detroit. Both men share the bond of being veterans. Glenn served in the U.S. Army Reserves and National Guard, and Santana was a U.S. Navy rescue swimmer.Lansing, Mich. — Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Midland, on Thursday joined the bipartisan Michigan Legislative Hispanic Caucus at the invitation of newly-elected caucus chairman Rep. Harvey Santana, D-Detroit and vice-chairman Rep. Bruce Rendon, R-Lake City.Glenn is not Hispanic, but the caucus by-laws state that “MLHC is committed to diversity and actively seeks to elect and recruit individuals from all segments of the population as officers, committee chairs, and members.”Santana said Friday he is “very excited and encouraged to have Rep. Glenn as a member. His experience will add tremendous value to the overall discussion of Hispanic economic prosperity. I look forward to listening to his views on the economy and how we can all participate in the American dream.”Glenn commended Santana for his leadership in convening the caucus and said “Harvey and I will focus on the common values that unite us regardless of ethnicity or party. President Kennedy correctly observed that ‘a rising tide lifts all boats,’ and all legislators should be committed to policies that raise the tide of economic opportunity in Rep. Santana’s district as much as in our own.”For example, Glenn said he will work to win caucus support for legislation to allow implementation of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy’s proposed Universal Tuition Tax Credit, which would “empower parents of all income levels, of all races or ethnic backgrounds, in all communities, to choose the best and safest schools for their children.”Santana said the caucus will focus on issues of common concern to Hispanics and all citizens including taxes, small business development, infrastructure investment, public education (K-12, college, and vocational), criminal justice, agriculture, housing, employment, and health care. Glenn and Santana have already agreed, once the weather improves, to host each other for a tour of their respective legislative districts.“Rep. Santana and I have the same title, but for him, the job description includes, for example, being called to personally intervene to stop violence between rival gangs,” Glenn said. “Obviously, we’re blessed that that’s not been part of the job description in Midland and rural Bay counties, so visiting each other’s district and witnessing the many differences will be educational and enlightening for both of us.“It’s about understanding, literally and figuratively, where the other guy’s coming from, and hopefully crafting bipartisan solutions based on understanding our differences that can then unite us in the task — without government dictating or guaranteeing equal outcomes – of ensuring everyone has equal opportunity to make a better life for themselves and their families.”Santana’s 9th House District is comprised of northwest Detroit and part of the city of Dearborn.The 98th House District represented by Glenn is comprised of the city of Midland and six suburban and rural townships in Midland County, plus the cities of Auburn, Linwood, and Pinconning and seven rural townships in Bay County.The caucus is also tentatively planning to hold a town hall meeting in May in Saginaw hosted by Rep. Vanessa Guerra, D-Saginaw.According to the U.S. Census, Hispanics comprise 8 percent of the population in Saginaw County and 4.9 percent in Bay County, both higher than the 4.7 percent statewide, while only 2.4 percent of Midland County residents are of Hispanic origin. Categories: Glenn News,Glenn Photoslast_img read more

Rep Hernandez Honored During Hispanic Heritage Month

first_img Categories: Hernandez News,News 02Oct Rep. Hernandez Honored During Hispanic Heritage Month PHOTO INFORMATION: (from left to right) MI-ALMA Board of Directors member Larry Arreguin, MI ALMA-Board of Directors member Saturnino “Nino” Rodriguez, state Rep. Shane Hernandez and former state Rep. Lee Gonzales.LANSING – State Representative Shane Hernandez (R-Port Huron) was honored last week by the Michigan Alliance of Latinos Moving Towards Advancement as part of their Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations.Hernandez, a freshman legislator who was named the “most conservative” member of the house for 2017 by MIRS news, stressed that he considers himself an American first:“My father taught us to consider ourselves Americans first,” said Hernandez. “However, I am very proud of my family heritage.”Representative Hernandez father, Salvador Hernandez Jr., worked his way up from general laborer to boiler operator at the Croswell pickle factory.  He instilled in his children a ferocious worth ethic and deep love of the United States Constitution.  Values he still holds sacred.last_img read more

Deep learning predicts drugdrug and drugfood interactions

Drug interactions, including drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and drug-food constituent interactions (DFIs), can trigger unexpected pharmacological effects, including adverse drug events (ADEs), with causal mechanisms often unknown. However, current prediction methods do not provide sufficient details beyond the chance of DDI occurrence, or require detailed drug information often unavailable for DDI prediction. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Figure 1. Overall scheme of Deep DDDI and prediction of food constituents that reduce the in vivo concentration of approved drugs. Credit: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology A new method of modeling drug-target interactions fixes a detrimental bias of past techniques Explore further More information: Deep learning improves prediction of drug–drug and drug–food interactions, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2018). 10.1073/pnas.1803294115 To tackle this problem, Dr. Jae Yong Ryu, Assistant Professor Hyun Uk Kim and Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee, all from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), developed a computational framework, named DeepDDI, that accurately predicts 86 DDI types for a given drug pair. The research results were published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on April 16, 2018, which is titled “Deep learning improves prediction of drug-drug and drug-food interactions.”DeepDDI takes structural information and names of two drugs in pair as inputs, and predicts relevant DDI types for the input drug pair. DeepDDI uses deep neural network to predict 86 DDI types with a mean accuracy of 92.4% using the DrugBank gold standard DDI dataset covering 192,284 DDIs contributed by 191,878 drug pairs. Very importantly, DDI types predicted by DeepDDI are generated in the form of human-readable sentences as outputs, which describe changes in pharmacological effects and/or the risk of ADEs as a result of the interaction between two drugs in pair. For example, DeepDDI output sentences describing potential interactions between oxycodone (opioid pain medication) and atazanavir (antiretroviral medication) were generated as follows: “The metabolism of Oxycodone can be decreased when combined with Atazanavir”; and “The risk or severity of adverse effects can be increased when Oxycodone is combined with Atazanavir”. By doing this, DeepDDI can provide more specific information on drug interactions beyond the occurrence chance of DDIs or ADEs typically reported to date.DeepDDI was first used to predict DDI types of 2,329,561 drug pairs from all possible combinations of 2,159 approved drugs, from which DDI types of 487,632 drug pairs were newly predicted. Also, DeepDDI can be used to suggest which drug or food to avoid during medication in order to minimize the chance of adverse drug events or optimize the drug efficacy. To this end, DeepDDI was used to suggest potential causal mechanisms for the reported ADEs of 9,284 drug pairs, and also predict alternative drug candidates for 62,707 drug pairs having negative health effects to keep only the beneficial effects. Furthermore, DeepDDI was applied to 3,288,157 drug-food constituent pairs (2,159 approved drugs and 1,523 well-characterized food constituents) to predict DFIs. The effects of 256 food constituents on pharmacological effects of interacting drugs and bioactivities of 149 food constituents were also finally predicted. All these prediction results can be useful if an individual is taking medications for a specific (chronic) disease such as hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2.Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee said, “We have developed a platform technology DeepDDI that will allow precision medicine in the era of Fourth Industrial Revolution. DeepDDI can serve to provide important information on drug prescription and dietary suggestions while taking certain drugs to maximize health benefits and ultimately help maintain a healthy life in this aging society.” This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Deep learning predicts drug-drug and drug-food interactions (2018, April 18) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-deep-drug-drug-drug-food-interactions.html Provided by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) read more

Novel tools bridge the information gap between citizens and electricity grid operators

first_img Explore further The future of renewable infrastructure is uncertain without good planning Why do people oppose these projects? One of the reasons is that stakeholders—local, regional and national governments, industry, environmental organizations and local residents—often feel their views and concerns aren’t being considered. To address the problem, the EU-funded project INSPIRE-GRID created several tools that allow all voices to be heard in the grid expansion planning and approval process. The project’s solution for increased stakeholder engagement has the potential to enable better conflict management and an expedited permit process.Tools for information and collaborationThe project team’s challenge was to help citizens provide informed opinions on complex matters by finding ways to bridge the information gap between power grid experts and the general public. Their solution to this challenge was to combine methods that facilitate decision-making with state-of-the-art tools that facilitate collaboration between all stakeholders.One of these tools, the geographic information system (GIS) web interface, makes it possible for local residents to visualize a power line’s possible routes and submit their views on them. A GIS was used in the planning of Swiss transmission line paths and of a power line transmitting wind-generated energy from the north to the south of Germany.Other INSPIRE-GRID tools deal with the difficulty of communicating a project’s expected benefits, which may not always be easily visible at local level. The project’s life-cycle assessment tool helps stakeholders to see the environmental impacts of future power lines. It also explains the reasons why a grid extension may be needed, for example to link renewable energy to the system or to reduce power interruptions and blackouts. Since the project’s end in 2017, such tools have already been used in a real-world environment.An INSPIRE-GRID (Improved and eNhanced Stakeholders Participation In Reinforcement of Electricity Grid) poster published on the ResearchGate website provides some promising conclusions about stakeholder engagement in future grid expansion projects. They state that “[e]arly, fair and trustworthy involvement of stakeholders can increase acceptance” of new grid projects. They also mention “careful selection of stakeholder engagement methods” and the use of “participatory decision-making methods to generate more inclusive decisions” as important factors to be considered. One thing is for sure, using these methods can only be a positive stepping stone to a more energy-efficient and low-carbon economy. Citation: Novel tools bridge the information gap between citizens and electricity grid operators (2019, June 6) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-06-tools-bridge-gap-citizens-electricity.html It’s generally agreed that a low-carbon economy is important if we’re to combat climate change. One obvious way to do this is to modernize our current power transmission grids so that we can make electricity more secure, affordable and sustainable. However, while this may seem straightforward in theory, in reality things aren’t always so simple. New grid projects often face strong opposition by the organizations and communities they affect. When such opposition is added to the lengthy process of obtaining the necessary permits that can last up to 10 years, many of these projects are delayed or even canceled. More information: INSPIRE-GRID project website: www.inspire-grid.eu/Stakeholder participation in the development of the electricity grid: the INSPIRE-Grid project: www.researchgate.net/publicati … INSPIRE-Grid_project Credit: CC0 Public Domain Provided by CORDIS This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more