Students register for DSLC

first_imgRegistration for the Diverse Students’ Leadership Conference (DSLC) began this week as the Saint Mary’s Student Diversity Board (SDB) prepares to host its annual spring conference for students, faculty and community members. This year’s DSLC Conference will be held on March 20 and 21. Senior Guadalupe Quintana, SDB vice president and chair of the DSLC Committee, said the Saint Mary’s DSLC is one of the largest student-run conferences in the Midwest. She said the DSLC will offer participants a range of assorted workshops, speakers and discussions aimed at exploring the theme of this year’s conference, “To change the world, you must start with yourself.” “We have a rich list of presenters this year,” she said. “Our opening keynote speaker, Arn Chorn Pond, is a survivor of the Cambodian genocide. … closing keynote speaker is Zainab Salbi, founder of Women for Women International, an organization that helps women survivors of war and civil strife get back on their feet.” Quintana said the DSLC carefully selects speakers and events to provide the most enriching experience possible for participants. “We choose speakers who have a story that is unique to them, inspiring and motivational,” she said. “Students then are able to see the world through a different lens, learn how to build up their own courage and be appreciative of their lives and the lives of others because everyone has challenges to overcome.” Junior Rachel Chaddah, a member of the SDB, said the conference is crucial in helping the SDB reach its goal of expanding the appreciation of other cultures. “[The SDB] is always seeking to create a forum to examine the positive impact diversity provides for all types of settings,” she said. “We want to provide the students, community, and faculty with an outlet to voice their thoughts and opinions on diversity as well as to supply them with new knowledge about it by bringing in workshop presenters and keynote speakers.” She said the conference will address a number of other issues such as overpopulation, domestic violence and the expression of diversity through tango. Chaddah said she is most looking forward to a performance by a step group from Ivy Tech. “The step group performed earlier this week at the Saint Mary’s first Apollo Night for Black History Appreciation week and they were absolutely great,” Chaddah said. Quintana said she expects the conference to be a huge success. “I hope everyone takes this great opportunity and joins us in our biggest celebration of diversity,” Quintana said. Registration for the DSLC ends March 5. The conference is free and open to students of Saint Mary’s, the University of Notre Dame and Holy Cross College. Members of the South Bend community are also invited to participate. To register for the event and find a complete schedule of the DSLC events, visit http://www3.saintmarys.edu/DSLC.last_img read more

Students dedicate summers to service nationally, globally

first_imgFor the past several months, Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns (CSC) provided students the opportunity to serve with partner agencies, examine social issues and reflect on their experiences through the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) and International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP) grounded in the roots of Catholic social thought.Two hundred and seventeen students completed SSLPs in 175 sites across the country, which were sponsored by 106 Notre Dame alumni clubs. Fifty three students completed ISSLPs in 17 countries, according to CSC  international service learning and justice education director Rachel Tomas Morgan. The ISSLP offers a chance to combine academic studies with hands-on volunteer activities in vastly different cultures across the globe, she said.The program includes a “year-long academic service-learning program that comprises two courses and the eight-10 week service-learning field placement so students receive an academic framing that surrounds their immersion experience,” Tomas Morgan said.Theological reflection and summer service learning director Andrea Smith Shappell said the SSLP also encourages students to learn academic and personal lessons through active service and integration in communities.The SSLP “recognizes that building relationships with people who live on the margins of society brings knowledge about people and social issues in ways that cannot be taught in a classroom setting,” Shappell said.Both programs require students to take workshops and classes on campus and then immerse themselves in the topic of study. Tomas Morgan said the ISSLP, which encompasses a three-credit pre-departure theology course and one credit for summer work, forces students to recognize and evaluate the existence of extreme poverty across the globe.“Through our classes, students are introduced to pressing global issues. Students who participate … already have a strong heart for the poor. It is our hope that our students also develop and cultivate a mind for the poor,” Tomas Morgan said.Shappell said the SSLP can also open students’ minds to future academic and career decisions and deepen their commitment to community service. SSLP students earn three theology credits for their summer work.“The SSLP has the potential for being a transformative experience for students,” she said. “This may be a new understanding of putting their faith in action, redirecting their career plans or deepening their commitment to community engagement.”Sophomore Amber Bryan spent her eight-week SSLP in New Orleans serving at St. Peter Claver Catholic Church for the Local Organizing Ministry.“I did a wide variety of things — help with the opening of a new school in the community, establish a good neighbor ordinance between community members and businesses with alcohol beverage permits, pack food in the food pantry and map blighted property,”  Bryan said.Bryan said the SSLP sparked a deeper interest in policymaking and reinforced her previous interest in education.“It was rewarding to help people get more than the immediate change that can be completed in 20 hours or so,” she said. “After the SSLP, I am going to be taking more research and policy courses. This experience reassured me that I want to work in education policy.”Senior Emily Horvath spent eight weeks in Chennai, India, working at Vidya Sagar school for children with developmental disabilities. She said her passion for occupational therapy led her to seek the opportunity of an ISSLP, which would push her outside her comfort zone.“I spent my time working in the occupational therapy department and teaching a creative movement (music and dance) class,” Horvath said. “The curiosity to travel to a random city in a random country, knowing no one, and see if I could come out of the experience with amazing new relationships plus a strong desire to pursue occupational therapy in a setting where I’d be working with children with developmental disabilities, made me choose to participate in an ISSLP.”“This experience also opened my eyes to the battle for the rights of people with disabilities that is currently being fought in India,” she said. “I formed friendships with people who face these issues every day. Forming these relationships has transformed my perspective on issues of global human development.”Tags: Center for Social Concerns, CSC, ISSLP, Notre Dame, service, SSLPlast_img read more

James Earl Jones & the Starry Cast of You Can’t Take It With You Begin Previews on B’way

first_img The Pulitzer Prize-winning You Can’t Take It With You centers on the freethinking Sycamore family and the mayhem that ensues when their daughter’s fiancé brings his conservative, straight-laced parents to dinner on the wrong night. The show debuted at the Booth Theatre in 1936 and was last revived on Broadway in 1983. Related Shows This is one tricky family dinner we can’t wait to attend! James Earl Jones, Rose Byrne and the starry cast of You Can’t Take It With You start performances on August 26 at the Longacre Theatre. Opening night for the Scott Ellis-helmed Broadway revival of Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman’s classic play is set for September 28. The cast also includes Elizabeth Ashley, Annaleigh Ashford, Kristine Nielsen, Byron Jennings, Johanna Day, Mark Linn-Baker, Reg Rogers, Crystal A. Dickinson, Marc Damon Johnson, Patrick Kerr, Will Brill, Fran Kranz, Nick Corley, Austin Durant and Joe Tapper. View Comments You Can’t Take It With You Show Closed This production ended its run on Feb. 22, 2015last_img read more