SMC magazine contributors share work at reading

first_img“Chimes,” the biannual art and literary magazine of Saint Mary’s College, will be released next week.  The magazine features various creative works from Saint Mary’s faculty and students ranging from first years to seniors.  Senior and co-editor Laura Corrigan said many students have two pieces in the magazine, which is the maximum accepted per student. Corrigan said she hopes the Saint Mary’s community will appreciate the pieces in this year’s edition. “We hope people will read and enjoy all of the pieces accepted this year and will be encouraged to submit next year,” Corrigan said.  “We also hope the writers’ hard work and creativity is accessible for others to enjoy.” Haemmerle said “Chimes” has had a long history – the first issue of the magazine was published in September of 1892. “The magazine has developed from being primarily a literary magazine to include art work as well,” Haemmerle said. “It also is published digitally on the ‘Chimes’ website.”  Haemmerle said that there were 36 poetry submissions this year, 19 of which were chosen for publication.  A chapbook was chosen as well, she said. The magazine received 22 fiction submissions, 10 of these were chosen, she said. Junior Landess Kearns said she is very excited about her poem, which will be published in this year’s edition. “I was thrilled when they chose my poem,” Kearns said. “It always it such an accomplishment to have work recognized by others, and I think that “Chimes” does a great job at selecting a wide variety of student pieces.” Corrigan said students and professors read both fiction and non-fiction pieces during the first official “Chimes” reading Thursday night in Spes Unica Hall at Saint Mary’s. Corrigan said attendance at the reading by both students and professors was better than expected. Sophomore Maria Monreal, senior Elizabeth Elsbach and sophomore Anna Fanelli read their pieces at Thursday’s gathering, where other writers shared their work as well. Elsbach said she has enjoyed being published in the “Chimes” multiple times through her years at Saint Mary’s, and likes seeing the literary talent in the community. She shared one of her poems at Thurday’s event, Elsbach said. “I read one of my poems called ‘Grinding the dregs’ at the ‘Chimes’ event,” Elsbach said. “It’s about sexuality and how people exploit it.  It’s always a pleasure to be chosen.” Senior Rose Franzen said she read one of her fictional short stories, entitled “My Brother’s Keeper,” about her brother coming back from active duty. She said she enjoyed sharing the story with others interested in art and creative writing. “I loved the reading last night because it is fun to share a creative piece with other people who love literature and art like I do,” Franzen said. Fanelli, a Humanistic Studies and German major, said that she enjoyed hearing the work of students from various majors. “I was shocked when one of the girls was a Biology major,” Fanelli said.  “It’s cool that not only English majors take part in this publication.”last_img read more

CSEM celebrates 10th anniversary

first_imgThis week, the College Seminar, the College of Arts and Letters’s signature interdisciplinary requirement, is celebrating its 10th anniversary.Implemented in 2005, the College Seminar requirement was initially intended to provide students with a traditional “Great Books” style of education and serve as an integration of the liberal arts. Now, the College Seminar serves as a course that both enhances students’ oral presentation skills and offers a variety of unique topics centered on a faculty member’s specific field.“[The] idea behind [the] College Seminar really was to give people an introduction to the three areas of the College [the arts, humanities, and social sciences],” Professor Essaka Joshua, professor of English and director of the College Seminar, said. “The idea was to take the classroom to the dorm and get people fired up about interesting issues connecting with what they were reading.”As part of the Seminar’s 10th anniversary, the College of Arts and Letters, in conjunction with its Department of Communications and Finances, is hosting a 10-day Twitter competition for students to share their personal lessons and experiences from their College Seminars. From April 10 to April 19, students can respond to questions tweeted by the College of Arts and Letters on its Twitter (@ArtsLettersND) using the hashtag #CSEM10 and receive prizes for the best answers. Prizes for the best tweets range from coffee mugs and campus gear from the College of Arts and Letters to Starbucks, Au Bon Pain and Hammes Bookstore gift cards.“Doing it on Twitter was a way to include everybody,” Joshua said. “We decided, in conjunction with the Office of Communication for Arts and Letters, on a Twitter competition that would be open to all current students.“The aim was really to get people talking about CSEM, sharing their experiences of it and, for those students who were not in Arts and Letters or who had not yet done it, to let them know what it is [that] we do that is distinctive within the College.”Several students have already participated in the competition, Joshua said.College Seminars have become unique for their interesting and diverse topics and focuses, Joshua said. Courses taught by Professors Andrew Weigert and David O’Connor are known to be especially popular, Joshua said.“CSEM gives you that opportunity to go for something outside of your discipline, because it is interdisciplinary by nature, and to go out of your comfort zone, which is nice because you end up with exploration as well as engagement,” Joshua said.Joshua views the genuine interest, engagement and bonding between students and professors as a measure of the success of the College Seminar, she said.“I measure success in whether ‘Are the students engaged? Do they love it? Do they come out talking about it afterwards and are they talking about it before they get to class?’” Joshua said.Tags: College of Arts and Letters, college seminar, CSEM10, Essaka Joshua, tenth anniversarylast_img read more