New intercollegiate fellowship selects eight College students

first_imgEight students from Harvard College have been named the inaugural fellows by the Intercollegiate Civil Disagreement Partnership (ICDP), a new consortium of five institutions. They join other fellows from the four partner schools: California State University, Bakersfield, CA; St. Philip’s College, San Antonio; Santa Fe College, Gainesville, FL; and Stanford University, Stanford, CA.The students were drawn from a wide range of backgrounds and all expressed a willingness to engage in dialogue with others across a diversity of opinions and experiences.The ICDP Fellows will participate in a fully remote program that will enable them to collaborate on developing skills to engage and facilitate conversations across political differences at their respective colleges and universities. The students will receive training in facilitation, engage in deliberative conversations within the Fellows group, and have opportunities to interact with speakers from different sectors over the course of the academic year.“Meaningful engagement across political difference is essential to civil discourse, but increasing polarization has made cross-ideological contact among students less likely,” said Jess Miner, executive director of the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. “Our intercollegiate partnership approach creates opportunities for such engagement by bringing together students from different regions and different types of institutions of higher education: community colleges, state universities, and research universities. We are excited to be able to launch this new fellowship with our partner institutions, to learn from each other, and from our student leaders in the year ahead.”In addition to acquiring real-world skills to become practitioners in facilitating civil disagreement, Fellows will have special opportunities to interact with the community of scholars connected to the ICDP.  Fellows will also have access to a wide range of additional online programming offered by the five partner institutions throughout the academic year in support of their academic, professional, and personal development.The ICDP Fellows receive a $1,000 honorarium for their year-long participation in the program, which is funded with generous support from the Mellon Foundation. The students representing Harvard in the first cohort are:Claudia Cabral ’22Salma Elsayed ’23Colin Gray-Hoehn ’21Kareem King ’23Claire Oby ’22Paige Proctor ’23Natalie Sherman Jollis ’21Jonathan Zhang ’23 Read Full Storylast_img read more

SMC magazine contributors share work at reading

first_img“Chimes,” the biannual art and literary magazine of Saint Mary’s College, will be released next week.  The magazine features various creative works from Saint Mary’s faculty and students ranging from first years to seniors.  Senior and co-editor Laura Corrigan said many students have two pieces in the magazine, which is the maximum accepted per student. Corrigan said she hopes the Saint Mary’s community will appreciate the pieces in this year’s edition. “We hope people will read and enjoy all of the pieces accepted this year and will be encouraged to submit next year,” Corrigan said.  “We also hope the writers’ hard work and creativity is accessible for others to enjoy.” Haemmerle said “Chimes” has had a long history – the first issue of the magazine was published in September of 1892. “The magazine has developed from being primarily a literary magazine to include art work as well,” Haemmerle said. “It also is published digitally on the ‘Chimes’ website.”  Haemmerle said that there were 36 poetry submissions this year, 19 of which were chosen for publication.  A chapbook was chosen as well, she said. The magazine received 22 fiction submissions, 10 of these were chosen, she said. Junior Landess Kearns said she is very excited about her poem, which will be published in this year’s edition. “I was thrilled when they chose my poem,” Kearns said. “It always it such an accomplishment to have work recognized by others, and I think that “Chimes” does a great job at selecting a wide variety of student pieces.” Corrigan said students and professors read both fiction and non-fiction pieces during the first official “Chimes” reading Thursday night in Spes Unica Hall at Saint Mary’s. Corrigan said attendance at the reading by both students and professors was better than expected. Sophomore Maria Monreal, senior Elizabeth Elsbach and sophomore Anna Fanelli read their pieces at Thursday’s gathering, where other writers shared their work as well. Elsbach said she has enjoyed being published in the “Chimes” multiple times through her years at Saint Mary’s, and likes seeing the literary talent in the community. She shared one of her poems at Thurday’s event, Elsbach said. “I read one of my poems called ‘Grinding the dregs’ at the ‘Chimes’ event,” Elsbach said. “It’s about sexuality and how people exploit it.  It’s always a pleasure to be chosen.” Senior Rose Franzen said she read one of her fictional short stories, entitled “My Brother’s Keeper,” about her brother coming back from active duty. She said she enjoyed sharing the story with others interested in art and creative writing. “I loved the reading last night because it is fun to share a creative piece with other people who love literature and art like I do,” Franzen said. Fanelli, a Humanistic Studies and German major, said that she enjoyed hearing the work of students from various majors. “I was shocked when one of the girls was a Biology major,” Fanelli said.  “It’s cool that not only English majors take part in this publication.”last_img read more