SMC magazine contributors share work at reading

first_img“Chimes,” the biannual art and literary magazine of Saint Mary’s College, will be released next week.  The magazine features various creative works from Saint Mary’s faculty and students ranging from first years to seniors.  Senior and co-editor Laura Corrigan said many students have two pieces in the magazine, which is the maximum accepted per student. Corrigan said she hopes the Saint Mary’s community will appreciate the pieces in this year’s edition. “We hope people will read and enjoy all of the pieces accepted this year and will be encouraged to submit next year,” Corrigan said.  “We also hope the writers’ hard work and creativity is accessible for others to enjoy.” Haemmerle said “Chimes” has had a long history – the first issue of the magazine was published in September of 1892. “The magazine has developed from being primarily a literary magazine to include art work as well,” Haemmerle said. “It also is published digitally on the ‘Chimes’ website.”  Haemmerle said that there were 36 poetry submissions this year, 19 of which were chosen for publication.  A chapbook was chosen as well, she said. The magazine received 22 fiction submissions, 10 of these were chosen, she said. Junior Landess Kearns said she is very excited about her poem, which will be published in this year’s edition. “I was thrilled when they chose my poem,” Kearns said. “It always it such an accomplishment to have work recognized by others, and I think that “Chimes” does a great job at selecting a wide variety of student pieces.” Corrigan said students and professors read both fiction and non-fiction pieces during the first official “Chimes” reading Thursday night in Spes Unica Hall at Saint Mary’s. Corrigan said attendance at the reading by both students and professors was better than expected. Sophomore Maria Monreal, senior Elizabeth Elsbach and sophomore Anna Fanelli read their pieces at Thursday’s gathering, where other writers shared their work as well. Elsbach said she has enjoyed being published in the “Chimes” multiple times through her years at Saint Mary’s, and likes seeing the literary talent in the community. She shared one of her poems at Thurday’s event, Elsbach said. “I read one of my poems called ‘Grinding the dregs’ at the ‘Chimes’ event,” Elsbach said. “It’s about sexuality and how people exploit it.  It’s always a pleasure to be chosen.” Senior Rose Franzen said she read one of her fictional short stories, entitled “My Brother’s Keeper,” about her brother coming back from active duty. She said she enjoyed sharing the story with others interested in art and creative writing. “I loved the reading last night because it is fun to share a creative piece with other people who love literature and art like I do,” Franzen said. Fanelli, a Humanistic Studies and German major, said that she enjoyed hearing the work of students from various majors. “I was shocked when one of the girls was a Biology major,” Fanelli said.  “It’s cool that not only English majors take part in this publication.”last_img read more

BT plans indexation cut to reduce £9bn deficit

first_imgUK telecoms giant BT plans to cut indexation for thousands of its pension scheme members as it seeks to address a funding shortfall of £8.8bn (€10bn).The company has agreed in principle with the trustees of the £50.8bn BT Pension Scheme (BTPS) to switch its inflation measure from the retail prices index (RPI) to the consumer prices index (CPI).However, BT has referred the case to the High Court to get clarification that it is able to make the change within the scheme’s rules.In the UK, CPI is generally lower than RPI, meaning inflation-linked benefit increases would be lower. Earlier this month, Dairy Crest said it had made a similar change to indexation rules for its £1.1bn scheme. Indexation changes have been proposed as one of a number of measures to ease the pressure on underfunded UK schemes, but some pension funds’ rules do not allow such a change.A spokesperson for the BT Group confirmed: “As part of the pensions review, we’re reviewing the use of RPI as the index for calculating increases to pensions in payment for Section C members in the BT Pension Scheme, and liaising with the BTPS trustees about this.“The scope of this review includes the future increases received on benefits already built up in the BTPS, including by Section C members who have left BT and those who are currently receiving a BTPS pension.“Having agreed the approach with the trustees, we are seeking clarity, through a court application, on whether it’s possible to change the index.”Section C has approximately 80,000 members. It was set up in 1984 when BT was privatised, and provides final salary-linked benefits for members who joined before 1 April 2009. Since that date the scheme switched to a career average basis. It was closed to new members on 31 March 2001.Section C members are entitled to an inflation-linked uplift every year subject to a 5% cap, according to workers’ union Prospect. Sections A and B of BTPS already use CPI as their inflation measure.According to BT’s annual report for the 12 months to 31 March 2017, the pension scheme had a shortfall of £8.8bn. However, a scheme funding update issued by the trustees earlier this year put the deficit at nearly £14bn as of 30 June 2016.In May this year BT announced it was investigating a potential contingent asset deal with scheme trustees as another option for reducing the deficit. BT has already set out a funding plan involving contributions of more than £2.8bn between 2018 and 2021, and a further £4.9bn by 2030.last_img read more

Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County Receives $10,000 In STEM…

first_imgSubmitted by Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston CountyBoys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County recently received a $10,000 gift from The Verizon Foundation.The Verizon Foundation is donating $10,000 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County, in keeping with its commitment to integrate technology in education to enhance learning and support organizations that spark student interest in STEM fields.The Verizon Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Verizon Wireless dedicated to solving critical social issues in the areas of education, healthcare and energy management particularly in underserved communities. This grant funding will provide much needed support to Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County’s Science Exploration Series program in the 2015-2016 academic year.The Science Exploration Series, a monthly, hands-on learning experience is led by Saint Martin’s University students and faculty and connects Club kids to new trends, topics and fun associated with Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Youth are exposed to potential STEM-related careers while becoming familiar with a local university in their own backyard.“I like going there and having a whole new perspective on things like what ‘pi’ is or learning how math is all around us. I liked the rocket project and using coordinates and angles to get the best launch,” said Club member, Alexandria. The kids aren’t the only ones thrilled with the partnership. Our Tumwater Club’s Education Coordinator Kaila Rants says, “I appreciate that these SMU student groups have worked hard to find projects that engage the kids and keep them thinking. They are using knowledge gained in school and building on that knowledge to complete fun projects.”In 2015 the Science Exploration Series served 40 kids from BGCTC’s Lacey, Olympia, Rochester, and Tumwater branches and will continue in the fall. Facebook126Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Leafs prepare for what promises to be a very grueling stretch drive

first_img“We’ve got the benefit of having an athletic therapist on staff who have been taking the players and working with them with regard to mobility and stretching . . . exercises that can be preventative medicine to help avoid injuries like pulled hamstrings, quads and groins,” said DiBella.“We feel anything we can do now to help their bodies will only aid us on our playoff run.”Nelson currently trails third-place Grand Forks Border Bruins by six points in Murdoch Division standings.The Bruins have been on a tear of late, winning three straight against Kelowna, Fernie and Spokane.So it’s looking like Nelson would play Murdoch Division leading Beaver Valley Nitehawks in the first round of the playoffs.Williams still not ready for prime time with LeafsJosh Williams, a Junior A netminder Nelson acquired before the roster deadline, remains inactive for the Leafs.Coach DiBella said an injury that was first thought to be able to heal over time required surgery, forcing Williams to remain out of the lineup.“We still have another week-and-a-half until we see Josh play his first game for us,” DiBella confessed.“He had surgery to trim his meniscus last Friday and has improved steadily since then.”The 18-year-old Williams came to Nelson from the Bonnyville Pontiacs of the Alberta Junior Hockey League.Short HopsNelson is going to be without the services of Nicholas Ketola as the Leaf forward continus to serve a suspension for a match penalty for hit-to-the-head. Ketola, gone for three games, is eligible to play February 6 against Spokane Braves. . . . Leafs have called up netminder Jared Martin from the Nelson/Castlegar Midget Reps squad to serve as backup to Patrick Ostermann. . . . The Leafs have lost the services of forward Malcolm Fenelon. The speedy forward, who came to Nelson from Columbia Valley, asked to leave the team. . . . Nelson & District Credit Union (NDCU) is hosting Member Appreciation night during the Friday, February 5, against Castlegar Rebels. Credit Union members are invited to present their NDCU MEMBER CARD debit card for a discounted admission for the game. NDCU members of all ages will be able to enter the draw for some great prizes during the third period, and the lucky season winners of the NDCU Puck-4-Bucks puck toss will toss one puck for a chance to win one $1000 NDCU term deposit. After jamming five games into a 10-day span to begin the New Year, the Nelson Leafs have been relaxing on easy street, playing three games in 20-day span — all, ironically, against the Castlegar Rebels.Game one of the triple-header went to the Rebels, 2-1 in overtime.Game two goes Friday at 7 p.m. in the NDCC Arena.However, after this brief late-season hiatus, the Leafs are faced with a February laced with games — nine from February 5-21.A mistake, made during the summer by the former coaching regime, that has not gone unnoticed by the current staff.“What’s most concerning to me are the seven games coming up (in February) in 12 to 14 days heading into the playoffs,” Leaf coach Mario DiBella explained to The Nelson Daily.“That’s a great concern and we’re taking measures to deal with that so we don’t go into the playoffs with a lot of injuries.”Of course DiBella and the rest of the coaching staff had no input into how the schedule was put together, having taken over the team in December.Instead of dwelling on the negative, the coaches getting assistance from the off-ice staff to educate the players about their bodies.last_img read more