Oladipo, Pacers end Cavaliers 13-game winning streak

first_imgHK coach lauds Standhardinger’s toughness: ‘He’s a brave guy’ Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Instead, they came up just short on a night James had 29 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists. Kevin Love added 20 points in Cleveland’s first loss since Nov. 9 at Houston. The Cavs had won seven straight on the road.These teams went toe to toe most of the night, trading jabs, leads and momentum swings.But Oladipo’s closing combination finally stopped Cleveland.After using an 11-2 third-quarter spurt to finally retake the lead, the Cavs played catch up for the final 14 minutes.They got as close as 96-95 on J.R. Smith’s 3-pointer with 2:49 to go.Then Bojan Bogdanovic answered with a 3, Oladipo made one of two free throws and then hit the 3 that made it a six-point game.Cleveland cut the deficit to 104-102 on Smith’s 3 with 10 seconds left, but Cory Joseph made two throw and Myles Turner grabbed the rebound off Love’s errant 3 to seal it.“Tonight was an example of us putting the ball in his hands in the fourth quarter, late in the game and he has to makes reads,” Indiana coach Nate McMillan said, referring to Oladipo. “He was able to do that.”TIP-INSCavaliers: Smith scored 15 points and was the only other player in double figures. … Love had seven rebounds. … The Cavs have scored 100 or more points in 19 straight games, the third-longest streak in franchise history. … Cleveland made 11 3s, its 15th consecutive game with 10 or more. They can tie the longest streak in franchise history Saturday. … Pacers: Turner had 15 points, seven rebounds and three blocks, his 11th game with three or more. … Indiana is 9-4 at home this season, where it has won four straight. … The Pacers were 15 of 39 on 3s and improved to 11-2 when making 10 or more this season. … Indiana had a 50-44 rebounding advantage.QUOTABLE“I’m just happy to see him — you know, a guy who was in Oklahoma City, didn’t get a, you know, a chance to really get his game on — come here back where he played college basketball and played so well,” Lue said when asked about Oladipo. “I’m happy for him and the way he’s playing.”INJURY REPORTCavaliers: Center Tristan Thompson and guards Derrick Rose, Iman Shumpert and Isaiah Thomas all sat out again. The game also was stopped briefly in the first quarter when Jose Calderon started bleeding. And Love appeared to hurt his right arm, but he and Calderon both finished the game.Pacers: Lance Stephenson was limping in the first half, favoring his left leg, but continued to play. Point guard Darren Collison did not finish the game after aggravating a knee injury.UP NEXTCavaliers: Return home Saturday against Philadelphia for their first back-to-back sequence since late October.Pacers: Hosts Denver on Sunday and will try to snap a two-game losing streak in the series. View comments Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. In late October, his shot with 10.1 seconds left beat San Antonio. On Wednesday, his 3 with 31.1 seconds to go beat Chicago. This time, with 1:01 left, Oladipo’s 3 gave Indiana a 103-97 lead that sunk the three-time defending Eastern Conference champs.Cleveland never got another chance to tie or take the lead.Indiana has won three straight, nine of 12 and is the first team to beat the Cavs twice this season. Not bad for a rebuilding franchise that got swept by Cleveland in the first round of last season’s playoffs.“You’ve got to take away the head of the snake, and that’s been Paul George and now it’s Oladipo,” LeBron James said. “They’ve given (him) the confidence, no matter make or miss. He missed three or four straight 3s — some of them didn’t hit the rim, some of them hit the backboard — but they’ve given him the confidence, keep taking ’em. Then he makes the (one) to kind of put it away,”While Oladipo gave Indiana the upper hand, James & Co. did everything they could to break franchise records for longest winning streak and most consecutive road wins.ADVERTISEMENT Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene INDIANAPOLIS, IN – DECEMBER 08: Victor Oladipo #4 of the Indiana Pacers dribbles the ball against the Cleveland Cavaliers at Bankers Life Fieldhouse on December 8, 2017 in Indianapolis, Indiana. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, User is consenting to the terms and conditions of the Getty Images License Agreement. Andy Lyons/Getty Images/AFPINDIANAPOLIS — Victor Oladipo keeps delivering knockout blows.And nobody in the NBA seems to be immune from his closing flurries.ADVERTISEMENT Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set LATEST STORIES It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Two nights after beating the league’s worst team with a late 3-pointer, Indiana’s new shooting guard did it again with another late 3 and the Pacers beat Cleveland 106-102 on Friday to end the Cavaliers’ 13-game winning streak.Oladipo finished with 33 points, eight rebounds and six 3s and played so well that Cavs coach Tyronn Lue called him an All-Star.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBrian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense“Coming from someone like him who’s been around great players, played with great players and, obviously, coaching the best player we have in our league it’s an honor for him to say that,” Oladipo said. “I’m not satisfied by any means and neither is this team. I’ve got to keep getting better, and this team has got to keep getting better.”The Pacers have played better than most expected following last summer’s Paul George trade. And the biggest reason has been Oladipo’s clutch shooting. Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales?last_img read more

Slow visual processing may lower IQ as we age

first_imgOld age may make us wiser, but it rarely makes us quicker. In addition to slowing down physically, most people lose points on intelligence tests as they enter their golden years. Now, new research suggests the loss of certain types of cognitive skills with age may stem from problems with basic sensory tasks, such as making quick judgments based on visual information. Although there’s no clear causal link between the two types of thinking yet, the new work could provide a simple, affordable way to track mental decline in senior citizens, scientists say.Since the 1970s, researchers who study intelligence have hypothesized that smartness, as measured on standard IQ tests, may hinge on the ability to quickly and efficiently sample sensory information from the environment, says Stuart Ritchie, a psychologist at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom. Today it’s well known that people who score high on such tests do, indeed, tend to process such information more quickly than those who do poorly, but it’s not clear how these measures change with age, Ritchie says.Studying older people over time can be challenging given their uncertain health, but Ritchie and his colleagues had an unusual resource in the Lothian Birth Cohort, a group of people born in 1936 whose mental function has been periodically tested by the Scottish government since 1947—their first IQ test was at age 11. After recruiting more than 600 cohort members for their study, Ritchie and colleagues tracked their scores on a simple visual task three times over 10 years, repeating the test at the mean ages of 70, 73, and 76.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The participants—all of whom had normal or, thanks to glasses or contacts, corrected-to-normal vision—sat before a computer and watched as two lines of different lengths flashed before their eyes. Joined by a single horizontal line at the top of the screen, this asymmetrical “n” shape appeared for a randomly assigned amount of time, sometimes as few as 6 milliseconds. The participants’ only job was to choose whether the longer line had appeared on the left or the right side of the shape by pushing a button. They were allowed to take as long as they wished to deliberate, Ritchie explains. (So boring was the 30-minute task that the elderly participants “groaned like hell” at its mention during the recent Lothian cohort reunion pictured above, he says.)Next, Ritchie and colleagues compared the amount of time it had taken for participants to make their choices, called inspection time, and examined how it tracked with their performance on four standard intelligence tests. All focused on solving problems based on novel information: For example, one test required recreating a visual pattern with colored blocks, while another required participants to listen to a list of numbers and recite them backward. Over time, the decline in participants’ scores on the intelligence tests was strongly correlated with an increase in their inspection times, suggesting that it might be possible to use the simpler task as a proxy for more complicated intelligence tests in hard-to-reach elderly populations, the scientists report today in Current Biology.The results strengthen the hypothesis that the complex intelligence we associate with geniuses like Albert Einstein may actually be driven by very simple processing skills in vision, hearing, and other senses, says John Gabrieli, a neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge who wasn’t involved with the research. As we age, our brains may become like “an extremely slow computer that can’t run more complicated operations,” he says. More research is needed to establish whether loss of visual processing speed actually leads to slower higher level thinking, but if it does, it might be possible to help 70-year-olds maintain intelligence by training them to make these simple visual judgments faster, he says. That’s easier said than done, however, Ritchie notes. One of his colleagues tried to improve his performance on the task over the course of 100 days, but “stopped getting better on the second day”—which doesn’t bode well for the test’s usefulness as a brain-training exercise.last_img read more