Moblissa fatal accident?victims die from multiple injuries – PM

first_img…children remain hospitalisedA post-mortem performed on the bodies of the two persons killed in the Moblissa, Linden-Soesdyke Highway smash-up on Saturday last has revealed that they both died from multiple injuries.Former seamstress Tessa Telford Ibrahim, 60, was killed, along with her sonTessa Telford IbrahimMarlon McFarlane, 30, a former employee of Guyana Goldfields and a former member of the Guyana Defence Force (GDF).The accident occurred after Ibrahim’s niece, Maisha Ibrahim, 23, lost control of the car when it dropped into a hole.After dropping into the pothole, the vehicle, in which Maisha’s young nieces were also travelling, veered into a ditch and came to a halt but not before hitting a tree. Following the incident, public-spirited persons rushed the family members to the Linden Hospital Complex (LHC) where the seamstress and her son wereMarlon McFarlanepronounced dead on arrival.Maisha was released from hospital on Wednesday, while her two nieces, Patricia McFarlane, nine, and Roshana McFarlane, seven, remained hospitalised.Patricia, who was transferred to the Georgetown Public Hospital, remains a patient there reportedly on life support while Roshana who suffered a broken leg remains in stable condition at the LHC.E Division (Linden-Kwakwani) Commander Anthony Vanderhyden on Thursday said Police were continuing the investigation into the accident and would send the case file for advice on the way forward.The Commander has since cautioned members of the public to exercise caution, especially when driving along the Linden-Soesdyke Highway.last_img read more

FIFA World Cup 2018 Final Draw: Russia, Saudi Arabia to play tournament opener on June 14

first_imgHosts Russia will kick off next year’s World Cup finals versus Saudi Arabia in Moscow and defending champions Germany will start against Mexico after Friday’s draw threw up some mouthwatering clashes.Five-times winners Brazil will face Switzerland in their first Group E match with Costa Rica and Serbia making up one of the tougher-looking of the eight groups.European champions Portugal will play Iberian neighbours Spain in their first match in Group B, while Argentina were placed in Group D with newcomers Iceland, Croatia and Nigeria.England will face the other debut nation Panama in Group G in which Belgium are the top seeds.Here they are! The groups for the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia! ????º???Which game are you most looking forward to?! ???#WorldCupDraw pic.twitter.com/CYBTaqkgpF- #WorldCupDraw ??? (@FIFAWorldCup) December 1, 2017Unlike previous laborious draw ceremonies, Friday’s event at the State Kremlin Palace was a quickfire operation.After speeches by Russian President Vladimir Putin and FIFA chief Gianni Infantino, the business of drawing the 32 balls from four pots began with eight World Cup greats, including Argentina’s Diego Maradona and France’s 1998 captain Laurent Blanc assisting in the process.”The most coveted trophy will be won by the team showing the most resilience,” Putin said shortly before Russia’s opponents were revealed. “I would like to wish success to all the teams and I call upon all loyal fans to come to Russia and enjoy the finals of 2018.”The month-long tournament, taking place across 11 host cities from Kaliningrad in the west to Ekaterinburg, 2,500km away in the east, begins on June 14.advertisementIt will involve 64 matches in total with the final taking place in Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium on July 15.??º??????#WorldCupDraw pic.twitter.com/Rgtj90zKMf- #WorldCupDraw ??? (@FIFAWorldCup) December 1, 2017last_img read more

Katarina Johnson-Thompson breaks British record to win heptathlon gold

first_imgSign up to The Recap, our weekly email of editors’ picks. A few short months ago Katarina Johnson-Thompson made a startling confession: despite being one of the best athletes on the planet she suffered from impostor syndrome. Now even she must know that she is the real deal.It was staggering enough to see her go toe-to-toe – and then topple – an all-time great in Nafi Thiam to claim a heptathlon gold medal in Doha. But it was the way she did it that really seared into both skin and soul. Over the two days of competition Johnson-Thompson never gave off a slightest whiff of weakness as she set four individual personal bests to keep Thiam at bay. And then, when victory was in the bag, she continued to push her body through the pain barrier on the final event, the 800m, to score 6,981 points – a tally that surpassed Jessica Ennis‑Hill’s British record of 6,955, which had stood as tall and imposing as an obelisk since London 2012.As Johnson-Thompson burst into tears after crossing the line she said all the injuries, heartbreaks and self-eviscerations during the last few years were worth it. “It makes it more special and sweet for sure,” she said beaming. “This is crazy for me.”Of course, this being Johnson-Thompson it was natural to fear some calamity or other would arise in the 800m, even when she had a 137‑point lead. A trip or a fall, perhaps, or even a random act of God. After all, at the Commonwealth Games last year she injured her calf with just 300m to go and had to do an impromptu triple jump – hop, skipping and jumping her way to victory. But this time there were no travails or torments, just another personal best of 2:07:26 and elation. Katarina Johnson-Thompson threw a personal best in the javelin. Photograph: Kai Pfaffenbach/Reuters Since you’re here… Katerina Johnson-Thompson gives everything down the home straight in the 800m. Photograph: Lucy Nicholson/Reuters Twitter Pinterest … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Share on WhatsApp The question was whether Thiam could respond in the javelin. A heavily-strapped arm to protect an injured elbow suggested otherwise, and the Belgian could only throw out to 48.04m – more than 10 metres below her best. Johnson-Thompson’s response? Another personal best of 43.93m.It meant Thiam had to finish nine seconds ahead of her in the 800m – and given that the Belgian’s personal best was eight seconds slower it was never going to happen. “I was always worried,” Johnson-Thompson joked afterwards. “I thought I was going to run out of the line in the 800m and I was going to get disqualified. I didn’t take anything for granted until I saw my name on the scoreboard. Dina Asher-Smith sets sights on being all-time great after Doha 200m triumph “Nafi is a phenomenal athlete, she has set the standard, she is one of the greats like Carolina Klüft. I witnessed 7,000 points first through her. She has raised the bar. I am glad I have been able to step up and be competitive.”No wonder she was elated. It is a long time since she burst into the public’s consciousness at London 2012, an eager young apprentice learning at the feet of Ennis-Hill. Most expected a smooth succession, the flame passing from one Briton to another, but instead Johnson-Thompson had to suffer a seven-year itch before getting her due rewards.Earlier in her career she would constantly visualise herself standing on the podium, the national anthem striking up and a gold medal round her neck, thinking that if she only believed enough it would happen. Athletics Incredibly, she had beaten Thiam, who won silver, by 304 points – the biggest margin of victory in the heptathlon at the world championships since 1987 – with Austria’s Verena Preiner claiming bronze.Johnson-Thompson had laid the groundwork on the opening day, setting personal bests in the 100m hurdles and shot put to lead Thiam by 96 points overnight. If the Briton was nervous going into the second day she disguised it like a master. She started with a massive long jump of 6.77m – her best in a heptathlon and well ahead of the Belgian’s 6.40m – to extend her lead to 216 points and never looked back. Share on LinkedIn Topics Share on Twitter Share via Email Read more If only. There were European and world indoor gold medals, and a Commonwealth Games triumph but when it really mattered injuries and ill-fortune got in the way. At the 2015 world championships she fouled three times in a row in the long jump while favourite. At the 2016 Rio Olympics a quadriceps injury flared up. Then, in front of her home crowd at the London 2017 world championships, she fluffed her lines in the high jump.It did not help either that she was up against Thiam. But she accepted the challenge, and pushed herself to be even better.“The low moments have helped me come back, to make the move to France, to take care of myself,” she said. “I am so happy with this.”She also grew up. For years Johnson-Thompson was a self‑confessed “mummy’s girl” who had most things done for her. But moving to Montpellier in early 2017 to join a renowned group that included Kevin Mayer, the world decathlon record holder, changed everything.“Moving to France has paid off,” Johnson-Thompson said. “It has been such a long road, I am glad I am coming into my best in these next two years.”When she first arrived, her coaches would call her “droopy” because she used to drop her head in competitions, while her trainer, Bertrand Valcin, kept telling her to smile more. On a glorious night in Doha, she fulfilled those orders to the letter. Support The Guardian Read more World Athletics Championships Katarina Johnson-Thompson Share on Messenger news Share on Facebook Pinterest Facebook Facebook World Athletics Championships: Johnson-Thompson wins heptathlon gold – as it happened Twitter Share on Pinterest Reuse this contentlast_img read more