No Jones Cup stint for Gilas; SBP eyes pocket tourneys

first_imgGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title “Based on the calendar, it will be quite difficult to participate in the Jones Cup,” SBP president Al Panlilio said. “It’s a grueling schedule.”The Jones Cup, an international event where formidable teams see action, will be held on July 12 to 21, and will run right smack into the PBA Commissioner’s Cup schedule. It has been a perennial training ground for many Philippine teams in the past and which the Filipinos won twice before.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsHosting a mini-tournament or a series of friendlies will be easier to do, Panlilio said, since they can take the PBA schedule into consideration.Lebanon and Jordan came over to play the Filipinos in exhibition matches before the Philippines went to Qatar and Kazakhstan to book crucial wins that sealed a second straight stint in the global showcase scheduled on Aug. 31 to Sept. 15 in eight cities in China. Meanwhile, in a continued show of solid support to the international program, the PBA said that it will lend its players even to the Southeast Asian Games where the Philippines is the heavy favorite for the cage gold medal.“Once chairman (Ricky) Vargas asks the PBA, we will give him players,” commissioner Willie Marcial said in Filipino as the PBA could ultimately wind up representing the country for the first time in the SEA Games.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college LATEST STORIES Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Tom Brady most dominant player in AFC championship history Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netDue to conflict with the PBA schedule, coach Yeng Guiao’s original plan of having Gilas Pilipinas play in the Jones Cup to prepare for the World Cup will not happen.Instead, the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) is thinking of hosting pocket tournaments, or friendlies, in order to get the National Five to play together with the World Cup in China still six months away.ADVERTISEMENTcenter_img SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold PLAY LIST 06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold01:45Explosive Gilas Pilipinas not yet at its best, says Tim Cone00:50Trending Articles02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Japeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for Ginebra MOST READ Rogue cops marked as Gamboa’s targets in his appointment as PNP chief After losing two world titles, Lakay ringmaster wants wards to go for swift, decisive wins Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Eugenie Bouchard’s bid for Australian Open spot ends in qualifying View commentslast_img read more

Tufaie Foundation Revamps Activities

first_imgThe Tufaie Foundation Child Care and Middle School located in Ganta has stepped up its services by procuring a brand new school bus to meet the transportation needs of its students.The proprietor of the school, Benedict Domah, told the Daily Observer that the school decided to purchase a bus owing to the serious difficulty the students encounter in reaching the campus on time each morning.He added that many of the students are between the ages of three and 15 years, and for them to be riding commercial motorcycles to school poses danger to their lives, as well as constrains them to leave the campus late after school hours.Mr. Domah said in order for the students to be adequately prepared academically, the school is using a Ghanaian curriculum as a reference guide to the Liberian curriculum and ensuring that full attention is given them in their lessons.Tufaie Foundation is among the leading toddler schools in Ganta, where most of the business people send their children to acquire quality education.During a visit to the campus by this reporter, it was discovered that many of the first graders who are ages four to six, have developed good writing skills, while many of the seventh and eighth graders are at the ages of 13 and 14.The older students, Mr. Domah said, are taken on a field trip every semester to see for themselves some of the historical sites such as mounts Nimba and Tokadeh and the Kpatawee Water Fall in Suakoko, Bong County because these are some of the places that are discussed in their social studies class.While the government is yet to provide subsidy to the school, Mr. Domah praised GoL for recently training and providing incentives for their teachers.The incentive was part of money the government allotted for private school teachers under the reference, “Ebola money.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

R8.3m boost for sustainable agriculture

first_img19 November 2012 Nedbank has invested R8.3-million in conservation group WWF South Africa’s Sustainable Agriculture Programme, which aims to tackle food security challenges as well as protect natural resources in the country. “A recent United Nations report titled ‘Food and Agriculture: The future of sustainability’ stresses the urgent need for the world’s farmers to be empowered to produce more food per unit of land, water and agrochemicals, while confronting widespread physical resource scarcity, a changing climate, and rapidly increasing input costs,” WWF-SA’s senior manager for sustainable agriculture, Inge Kotze, said at the launch in Cape Town last week. “These challenges overlaid with the degradation of our natural eco-systems and biodiversity make modern day agriculture more precarious than ever.”Collective and collaborative partnerships Collective and collaborative partnerships have an important role to play in enabling sustainable agriculture which contributes to the reduction of environmental and natural resource impacts, said Nedbank Agriculture’s John Hudson. “No single individual or organisation has the capacity to deliver the level of change required to make a real and lasting contribution to the sustainability of our country’s agriculture,’ he said. “[This] is why this partnership with WWF-SA is designed to unlock the full power of collective, public-private partnerships, collaborative investment, and support and recognition for those that demonstrate commitment and innovation in meeting the agricultural challenges facing South Africa and the world in the 21st century.” Only 13% of the South African landscape is suitable for arable or permanent cropland, and two-thirds of the country’s surface freshwater resources are currently utilised for irrigated agriculture, according to WWF-SA.Supporting a vibrant agricultural sector “There is an urgent need to redefine and refocus our vision in terms of the future of food and the role of agriculture in reaching that future,” Kotze said. “This is why the Sustainable Agriculture Programme is aimed at enabling better production, rather than merely focusing on increased output alone. “By promoting and supporting a vibrant and profitable agricultural sector in this way, we can all help to address potential food security challenges, while at the same time protecting the country’s/the planet’s natural resources, and unique biodiversity,” she said. Hudson said Nedbank aimed to promote and reward agricultural best practice and innovation. “By 2050, conservative estimates are that there will be around 9-billion people living on Earth. “If our country is going to overcome the significant environmental, social and economic challenges involved in feeding our population at this time, it is the responsibility of every one of us to start thinking and acting more sustainably right now,” he said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

J&K Assembly finally clears GST Bill

first_imgJammu and Kashmir, the only State to miss the Goods and Services Tax (GST) rollout bus on July 1, will join the new tax regime from tonight as the State Assembly passed a Bill in this regard on Friday amid Opposition boycott.The Assembly passed the Bill to adopt the presidential order that “offers safeguards to its special status”. CM Mehbooba Mufti said “J&K cannot get bigger azadi [freedom] than this order, restoring the lost sanctity of our Assembly.” Responding to J&K’s demands to safeguard its taxing rights under Article 370, the presidential order reads: “…the powers of the State of J&K as per Section 5 of the Constitution of J&K, shall remain intact.”The order called for incorporation of fresh clauses under Article 246 of the Constitution. “Under 246A (1), the Legislature of the State of Jammu and Kashmir shall have powers to make laws with respect to goods and services tax levied by the State.” However, the order said, Parliament shall have power to make laws with respect to goods and services tax levied by the Union.Opposition walks outThanking President Pranab Mukherjee, PM Narendra Modi and Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, Ms. Mufti said, “This act of the Centre will be written in golden words in Kashmir’s history.” The National Conference boycotted the Assembly proceedings describing it as “sham.” The Congress also staged a walkout in protest when the Bill was tabled. Both the parties were demanding a separate legislation on GST in J&K. Meanwhile, internet services were stopped in the Valley as part of unprecedented security measures to foil any attempt by supporters of the slain Hizb commander, Burhan Wani, to pose a law and order problem.last_img read more

India’s youth spend more time on internet than with friends: India Today survey

first_imgIn a fiercely competitive world, young people are using their limited leisure to build their skillsWith over 550 million Indians under 25, India is now the envy of many developed countries around the world which are facing problems arising out of aging populations. The 12-24 years age band is a,In a fiercely competitive world, young people are using their limited leisure to build their skillsWith over 550 million Indians under 25, India is now the envy of many developed countries around the world which are facing problems arising out of aging populations. The 12-24 years age band is a tumultuous journey, synonymous with life-defining changes. In this ‘growing up’ phase, priorities metamorphose. It’s in this context that the role of leisure becomes critical.While leisure is important for all ages, its importance in the psychological, physical and intellectual development of young people is well recognised. But in the absence of any concerted initiatives like sports, cultural groups and youth camps like in many developed countries, what do India’s urban young do in their leisure time?One of Technopak’s recent studies- India Consumer Trends 2006/07 – has brought out some very interesting facts about the leisure habits of 12-24-year-olds. Leisure is fast becoming sedentary and passive. Watching television is the most prominent among leisure activities for the youth, taking up close to three hours every day.Young males may still be devoting about 40 minutes a day towards sports but females are on the playfield far less. Office-goers spend barely 15 minutes on exercise of any kind. While spending time with friends still comes up as a significant activity, its importance is reducing as gaming, Internet browsing and other ‘my time’ entertainment options become popular.’Hanging out with friends’ as an activity seems fairly prevalent among the student community but reduces once they start working, and is mostly done at a friend’s house or around parks, movie halls, malls and markets. Access to a PC and the Internet is significant. Those who have a PC, use it to play games, work on something related to academics, browse or chat online.advertisement50% of those polled have access to the Internet, either at home or through cyber cafesSocialising, normally happening on the playground, is increasingly moving to a virtual medium, as it offers ‘own-term entertainment’. So, are we breeding a generation of couch potatoes disinclined towards any physical activity? The answer lies in an acknowledgement of the environment our youth live in today. In a fiercely competitive world with importance attached to academic excellence and getting ahead, young people are using their limited leisure to build their skills.An increasing number view leisure as an unaffordable luxury that cuts into time available for tuitions and self-improvement courses. De-stressing is no longer something only corporate executives do. Home has become the mandatory place to “chill, switch off and then thrill”.The other key contributor to this is, of course, the lack of urban infrastructure that would provide the facilities for active recreation. Most neighbourhoods have the merest apology of a park. Many of the larger parks in a city are offlimits for games. Government sports facilities are few and far between. Schools too typically do not provide access to their recreation areas after school hours. So where can Indian youth build the practice of an active lifestyle?It is difficult to hypothesise how today’s youth, brought up in such an environment, will cope with the challenges of the real world and what the impact will be on Indian society. However, as a 48-year-old, what I can say, with some sadness, is that the ‘virtual’ life we are subjecting our youth to today is not a patch on the ‘normal’ life we enjoyed in our youth-a life that seemed so much fuller even with fewer means and gadgetry.While it is not feasible for the government to create large, open spaces in major cities any more, it is possible to create hundreds of natural parks-each of a few hundred hectares in size-across India that can be reserved for outdoor activities such as hiking, youth camps, sports, and will bring the young out of their bedrooms, cyber cafes, and coaching classes into a world of sunshine and stars.last_img read more