Gbarnga Feuds Over Naming of Street in Sen. Taylor’s Honor

first_imgSen. Jewel Howard TaylorThe naming of a street in honor of Bong County Senator Jewel Howard-Taylor in the provincial capital of Gbarnga has created intense confusion as some eminent citizens are now distancing themselves from the decision, which they said was not reached by consensus. The move to honor Sen. Taylor has backfired with council members differing with former Mayor Melvin Cole.In a mobile phone interview with the Daily Observer, one of the council members, Ansu Sesay, said he was a member of the council when Cole was serving as mayor, “but I don’t know how the renaming of the street in honor of Mrs. Taylor came about.” Cole is now Representative-elect of Bong County Electoral District #3.Sesay said the decision to name the street did not come from the council, but was a unilateral decision by Cole, “because I heard about the development only in the media.”He said there are a lot of streets in Gbarnga that bear names dating back to the beginning of the existence of the city, which were neither given by current Mayor Viola Cooper, nor then mayor, Cole.“There was no meeting held among the stakeholders to arrive at a consensus to name or rename any street in honor of anyone,” he said.Sesay said if Rep. Cole confirmed that the naming of the street in Sen. Taylor’s honor met the agreement of the council, “then he will have to provide evidence, because they have a secretary that can take down minutes of every meeting.”He accused Cole of misleading the public that they all agreed to name the street in honor of Sen. Taylor, “because during a recent meeting with Sen. Taylor she only told the body of her intention to bring sign posts for streets in Gbarnga that will be placed at the various intersections to direct visitors.”Sesay said in that meeting, Sen. Taylor informed them that funding for the project was provided by authorities of the Liberian Agency for Community Empowerment (LACE), “so we all agreed to her suggestion not to name the street in her honor.”In his reaction, Cole said Sen. Taylor did not name the street in her own honor, but the decision was through an agreement reached by the Gbarnga City Council.“We always made mistakes to put people who don’t know how to read and write to a position of trust in this country,” the former mayor, now Representative-elect, said.Cole said it was based on an agreement between the city council and administration that they named the street in honor of Sen. Taylor for her “immense contributions to the county,” and to demonstrate to that the county respects her for the level of development she spearheaded in the county.He said it was through Sen. Taylor’s effort that the streets in Gbarnga were named, “so they decided to name one of the streets in her honor.” Most of the streets in Gbarnga did not have names, he said, “but with the intervention of Sen. Taylor with financial aid, the naming of the streets took effect.”Cole said they named other streets in honor of people that have been actively working for the growth and development of the county. If Mayor Cooper removes the sign posts to the street, she will be resisted, he added, “because we are not going to take it from her.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Uber’s self-driving fleet in Pittsburgh goes live

first_imgRelated Posts Self-driving Volvo XC90 cars have entered into Uber’s taxi fleet, marking the first public ride-hailing test in the United States. The cars will be available to select customers in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who will be able to ride in the cars for free.Uber has been testing cars in Pittsburgh for over a year, after poaching most of the robotics team from Carnegie Mellon University. Earlier this year, it brought the self-driving system onto public roads.See Also: Would it make sense for Tesla to buy Lyft?A driver and analyst will be inside all autonomous cars to monitor the car’s decision making and take control if the system fails. An early test by Engadget suggests that the self-driving system is quite sophisticated, making a lot of the decisions by itself, although it allegedly had more issues with bridges.Uber has pushed heavily into the self-driving world in the past few months, announcing a $300 million investment with Volvo and acquiring self-driving truck startup Otto for $680 million.It comes at a time when its main rival (and investor) Google is struggling to find a way to commercialize its own self-driving platform. The search giant has lost key executives, including Anthony Levandowski, who left to create Otto and now works at Uber, and Chris Urmson, one of the last core members of the project.Uber not wanting to leap into hardwareAnalysts are bullish on Uber’s chances in the self-driving world. It already has the largest ride-hailing platform in the world, and partnerships with Volvo mean it doesn’t need to build its own car.That said, as the self-driving market heats up, Uber might struggle to purchase cars from Ford and General Motors, which may lower the amount of self-driving cars it can have on the road in the short term.Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is on the hunt for self-driving cars, saying that if Tesla were to announce a fully autonomous car, it would snap up half a million in one day. A bit of a harrowing statement to Uber drivers. For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… David Curry Tags:#autonomous cars#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#Pittsburgh#ride-hailing#Self-Driving#top#Uber#Volvo center_img Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and… IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle…last_img read more

RGD to Host Registration Fair in Gayle, St. Mary

first_imgStory Highlights Speaking with JIS News, RGD’s Marketing and Planning Manager, Nicole Whyte noted that the fair is to facilitate persons who are without a birth certificate or those who may need to complete the process. Residents of Gayle and its environs in St. Mary, will be able to access late registration and late entry of name services, free of cost at the Registrar General’s Department (RGD) registration fair slated for Tuesday, February 26 at the Gayle Seventh-day Adventist Church. Residents of Gayle and its environs in St. Mary, will be able to access late registration and late entry of name services, free of cost at the Registrar General’s Department (RGD) registration fair slated for Tuesday, February 26 at the Gayle Seventh-day Adventist Church.Speaking with JIS News, RGD’s Marketing and Planning Manager, Nicole Whyte noted that the fair is to facilitate persons who are without a birth certificate or those who may need to complete the process.“So, if you are not sure you were registered, never seen a copy of your birth certificate, have a birth certificate but no surname or name on it, then we will help you get an identity,” Mrs. Whyte said.She explained that the intent is to host a series of registration fairs across the island as part of the Agency’s drive “to register all unregistered persons in Jamaica, as there are persons who are not accounted for – they do not have an identity; they were born but were never, ever registered.”“So, there is no name at registration, just the sex of male or female, the date and where they were born. Also there are persons who were given a first name but no surname, and that is not acceptable now. We cannot print or generate a birth certificate without a name or surname on it, and so the registration process would be deemed incomplete in these instances,” she pointed out.For the fair, Mrs. Whyte said that persons will be required to present whatever documents they possess that can be used as verification, in addition to completing a form.“If persons have access to their christening records, a marriage certificate, if any of their parents is deceased and they have the death certificate, immunisation card, or school records… whatever they have as proof of name or to substantiate who they say they are, will be accepted and used in the registration process,” she pointed out.Persons will also need to indicate which of the RGD offices they will collect the certificate when the process is completed.Highlighting the importance of registration, Mrs. Whyte pointed out that a birth certificate is needed, in order to obtain other important documents.“So you need a birth certificate in order to obtain a passport, tax registration number (TRN), to apply and get benefits from the Programme of Advancement Through Health and Education (PATH), or for persons who are working and approaching retirement, they need their birth certificate in order to access their pension,” she noted.“Also, in preparation for the National Identification System (NIDS), persons will need their birth certificate to get their national identification. So we ask persons if they know they are not registered, they need to start the process of registration now,” the Marketing and Planning Manager urged.At the fair, persons may also be able to access all other services such as applying for a birth, marriage or death certificate; correction of error; addition of father’s particulars, at the regular cost.Persons who are already registered, but need another copy of their birth certificate, can also access the service at a cost.This is the second, in a series of registration fairs, with the first held in June 2018 in Linstead, St. Catherine.“The first fair was an overwhelming success, so we are expecting a similar or bigger turnout for this our second staging, and will continue to have as many as possible across the island, as we find that persons like when you take things almost to their doorsteps,” Mrs. Whyte pointed out.The fair will last from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For information on dates and locations of the fairs, members of the public can contact the RGD at 876-619-1260 or 749-0550. “So, if you are not sure you were registered, never seen a copy of your birth certificate, have a birth certificate but no surname or name on it, then we will help you get an identity,” Mrs. Whyte said.last_img read more