Klopp ignoring wobble to focus on the future

first_imgJurgen Klopp is not worried that Liverpool have lost momentum in the last week as he insists the squad do not discuss the situation at the top of the Premier League table.The Reds lead the way after 21 matches, but their advantage over Manchester City was cut to four points last week as they lost at the Etihad Stadium.A further defeat to Wolves in the FA Cup has hinted at a wobble in Liverpool’s so far outstanding season, yet Klopp is keen to leave those defeats in the past – along with the team’s prior good work and any talk of how the Reds’ position compares to previous campaigns. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? “Statistics from the past have no relevance in the present. It’s always different – that’s what we’ve said,” Klopp said ahead of the trip to Brighton and Hove Albion. “We don’t think about the season before or 20 years ago.”Our season so far is really good and now we have to carry on. It’s not important what has happened so far – it’s only a basis. We have to use it. That’s what we try to do.”Two weeks ago, everyone was so excited about the distance between [Liverpool and City] and stuff like that.”Now we’ve had two games which we’ve lost. It’s not nice, but it’s not a real problem. These games are gone as well. We have to prepare for Brighton and go there and try to do our best again.”We only talk here [with the media] about the distance and the points and stuff. We never do that during the week, because it’s just not relevant. We have to train as well as possible and prepare the next game.”Klopp claims Liverpool will approach the title run-in in the same way they have tackled previous challenges, such as qualifying for the Champions League last term.”These are normal challenges and now we go for the big stakes. This is how it is,” he said. “The less games you have, the better it is because you have all your points. You play each other or not, it’s normal.”Every year is the same. Last year we fought for the Champions League, everything was fine and Chelsea found their feet and made it really difficult at the end. There’s nothing on top of that, just the normal thing.”You have to stay completely focused on yourself. We try to do it and so far it has been pretty easy for us to stay focused. That’s what we have to show again.”There’s no game in the Premier League where you can count the three points before you play the game. I like that. That’s good.” Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more

Nova Scotia Marks Right To Know Week

first_imgNova Scotia, the first Canadian jurisdiction to implement access to information legislation, will celebrate Right to Know Week, today, Sept. 28 to Saturday, Oct. 3. Premier Stephen McNeil has officially proclaimed Right to Know Week and Nova Scotia Information and Privacy Commissioner Catherine Tully, will moderate a panel discussion at Halifax City Hall later today. Over the past year, responses to information requests became the responsibility of the Department of Internal Services. Centralizing access to information work will mean more timely, more consistent responses to applicants. In 2014, provincial government offices received 1,812 Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIPOP) applications and completed 78 per cent of the responses within 30 days, as stipulated under the act. Only seven per cent of the applications took longer than 60 days to complete. Work has begun to identify information datasets that can be made freely available through a government open data portal. A request for proposals was issued in June to create and manage the portal. The original Freedom of Information Act came into effect in 1978. Right to Know Day originated in Bulgaria in 2002. This is the 10th year Canada has recognized the event.last_img read more