Mississippi State Earned Every Bit Of That Upset Over UConn

Wow.I mean, wow.Mississippi State’s victory over UConn was a great game, and a great upset. Mississippi State will go down in history as the team that ended the longest win streak in basketball (and possibly college team sports) history, and they did it in style.First off, let’s be clear that this is not the most improbable upset of all time. The FiveThirtyEight March Madness predictions gave Mississippi State a 13 percent chance of winning, which — if accurate — wouldn’t even make the dais in the celebration of greatest upsets in history. It wasn’t even the Bulldogs’ biggest upset this week, as our model gave them only an 11 percent chance of beating Baylor, who they beat 94-85 in the Elite Eight. Yes, some people (like this idiot) thought 13 percent was crazy high given UConn’s history, not to mention the 98-38 beatdown the Huskies gave the same Bulldogs team in last year’s Sweet 16.But if I went into this game thinking the model was too optimistic for Mississippi State, by halftime it started looking like that 13 percent might have been low. Not only was UConn not dominating, they were getting outplayed.For me, this is what made this upset even more amazing. Sometimes the better team’s shot goes cold or the underdog’s heats up at the right time, and there isn’t much to do about it except try to do better next game. That was not this game.Shooting and shooting opportunitiesTo my eye, the UConn offense looked frustrated all night, yet they were easily still the better shooting team. UConn shot 42 percent on 2-point shots and 47 percent on 3-point shots, while Mississippi State shot 42 percent and 27 percent, respectively. All together, the Huskies scored 1.12 points per shot (counting 2-point shooting fouls) compared to 0.90 points per shot for the Bulldogs.That should be a recipe for a nice comfortable win. But the Huskies had only 57 shooting possessions (46 shots from the floor, plus 11 shooting fouls), while the Bulldogs had 73 (67 plus 6).How did Mississippi State get 16 more shooting opportunities? Like so:According to the play-by-play of the game on ESPN, the Bulldogs had 16 rebounds on offense to the Huskies’ six, creating ten more scoring opportunities.1You may notice the ESPN box score gives Mississippi State only 14 offensive rebounds. The reason for the discrepancy between the box score and the play-by-play data is unclear to me without knowing more about the nuances of NCAA scoring methodology, but those two extra scoring opportunities happened.The Bulldogs had 13 turnovers to the Huskies’ 17, which created four more opportunities for Mississippi State.2Note the box score records 14 Bulldogs turnovers, but one of those is referring to the flagrant-1 foul that gave Connecticut two shots and the ball, which did not lead to a change of possession.The Bulldogs had the last offensive possession in all five periods, and started with the ball in the second and third quarters, netting them two extra “fencepost” possessions.To recap: Mississippi State netted ten extra shot opportunities from rebounding, four from steals/ball protection, and two from clock management.UConn’s offensive failureThose possession stats are the “what” of “what happened” – the Bulldogs made up a sizeable shooting gap by edging the Huskies in the other aspects of the game. But why did it happen?The story of this game was the UConn offense continuously trying — and failing — to penetrate Mississippi State’s interior defense. This was reflected in a few ways:The Huskies made just 42 percent of their 2-point shots, compared to 58 percent in the regular season.Despite all those misses, they got only six of 29 possible offensive boards, for 21 percent. Compare that to 36 percent in the regular season.The Huskies turned the ball over 17 times (eight stolen). With just four steals themselves, they forced 13 fewer turnovers than they committed. In the regular season, they forced 1.7 fewer turnovers from steals than the total number of turnovers they committed per game, on average. Much of the deficit Friday night resulted from interior passes that the Bulldogs got their hands on.The irony is that UConn was shooting better than average from beyond the arc, making 47 percent of its threes, compared to their regular-season average of 40 percent. Despite being frustrated all night trying to get to the basket, they just kept trying and trying. As I saw it, it looked like the Huskies responded to their struggles by trying to get back to “fundamental” rim-attacking basketball, when they probably should have gone less fundamental and bombed away from the perimeter.Oh, and Connecticut also missed a couple of free throws that probably could have sealed the deal. This could have been nerves, but who knows. If the teams were who we thought they were, the game shouldn’t have been close enough for that to matter.After Mississippi State beat Baylor, a team we though had a real chance of beating UConn, my main thought was that Baylor probably wasn’t as good as I thought they were. But I should have been giving Mississippi State more credit. Against UConn, they earned it all, with full backpay.Correction (April 3, 4:06 p.m.): A previous version of this article incorrectly identified the sources of some of Mississippi State’s extra scoring opportunities. The article incorrectly said that six of those opportunities came from their three fewer turnovers, when three fewer turnovers would only account for three extra opportunities. Using the play-by-play data to account for the remaining discrepancy, we determined that Mississippi State netted four opportunities from turnovers instead of six, and 10 opportunities from rebounding instead of eight. read more

Screen Time Contributing to Obesity in the Very Young Says Child Doctor

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, November 15, 2017 – Nassau – Next time you are tempted to give your child extra time in front of a screen, don’t.  “TVs, tablets, and smart phones are no substitute for parenting, they are only tools,” says Lashan McKenzie, M.D. “A tablet never raised a child.”Dr. McKenzie is a pediatrician who spent seven years in the public health system before joining The Wellness Clinic on Collins Avenue, a team of wellness medical and lifestyle professionals headed by Arlington Lightbourne, M.D.“It was the time I spent in clinics throughout Nassau that opened my eyes to the problem of  pediatric obesity, and the major issues confronting us because of an increasingly inactive and underactive population,” said Dr. McKenzie, DM, who took up her post in the private sector last month.Her passion about getting even the youngest child engaged, outside and off electronics is matched only by the reality she has seen and treated when physical activity is superseded by sedentary.“I watched an 8-month-old get on Youtube,” she said.   “The parents thought their child was a genius.   He pressed the button, Mom put on the ‘kiddie’ show he was watching before, he repeated the action.   It was rote memory and yes, it was cute, but it was not healthy learning or development.   All it was doing was conditioning his brain to achieve the reward of praise by pushing a button,” says Dr. McKenzie, who fears what the future holds for a generation of electronically addicted children.“I know that parents mean well and they are proud when their son or daughter shows ability on electronics that many people far older than they would struggle with, but I just want to make those caring parents aware that there is a price that comes with too much screen time,” said Dr. McKenzie.One of her greatest worries is that connected with the misuse and overuse of electronics is casual, almost absent-minded eating.“Kids graze all day,” she notes.  Her recommendation – try to have at least one structured family meal a day without any screen time.   “Parents have the responsibility of being media mentors for their children.   It takes some level of commitment, but parents are the best teachers.   Make reading fun from infancy, encourage children to imagine, play board games, solve puzzles, listen to music, play an instrument, join a team, and do activities outside.”At The Wellness Clinic located south of Doctors Hospital, Dr. McKenzie said she has the support of a full team dedicated to healthy lifestyle.  Among the team are nutritionist and lifestyle coach Justice Brown, a strong support staff, a healthy cleaning service using all nature-based products and at the helm, Dr. Lightbourne who also turned to wellness after years of witnessing and treating the results of poor lifestyle choices ending in too many crises cases in the emergency room.“Wellness is not a place, it is a journey,” said Dr. Lightbourne, “and we are delighted that Dr. McKenzie who is eminently qualified to serve in the capacity of pediatric wellness specialist is joining the journey, especially as it relates to childhood obesity.   The goal is to try to save the next generation of Bahamians.   We know that goal is ambitious, but we also believe it is necessary.   Wellness is not a luxury.   We are talking about survival.” Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more