Harrison finishes Wildcats

first_img “We’re playing like a mediocre ball club,” Arizona coach Lute Olson said. “If we’re going to change that we need to play as a team.” Johnson, playing in his first game since serving a two-game suspension, put the Ducks up for good with a driving jumper in the lane that made it 66-64 with 3 minutes to play. A free throw by Adams cut Arizona’s deficit to one point, but Brooks followed with a free throw and Oregon closed out the final 2:34 on a 7-3 run. Hairston hit four 3-pointers in just over 4 minutes midway through the second half to lead the Ducks on a 16-3 run. His first 3-pointer at the 14:11 mark broke a 44-44 tie, and his layup with 8:44 left gave Oregon its largest lead of the game, 60-49. “Malik was on fire,” Brooks said. “That’s why we call him our stud. He hit some clutch shots; he played his heart out.” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGift Box shows no rust in San Antonio Stakes win at Santa Anita Aaron Brooks added 17 points for Oregon, which shot 55 percent from the field, while Bryce Taylor scored 11 and Brandon Lincoln and Ivan Johnson each had 10. But it was Hairston leading the way, hitting nine of 13 field goals. “If you look at his face and his demeanor, he looks 24 or 25,” Oregon coach Ernie Kent said. “Then you remember he is only 18. There will be a time when he takes over an entire game, but he is not quite there yet.” The Wildcats were swept on the Oregon trip for the first time since 2000. Mustafa Shakur scored 19 points for the Wildcats, who lost 75-65 to Oregon State on Thursday, and Hassan Adams added 15. The Ducks (9-8, 3-2 Pac-10) beat the Wildcats (10-6, 3-3) for the first time since 2002 and got their first victory against a ranked opponent since beating No. 25 Stanford on Feb. 6, 2003. “It’s a big win, it’s a great feeling,” said Hairston, a sophomore. “It’s the first time since I’ve been here that we beat a ranked team.” center_img EUGENE, Ore. – Malik Hairston’s big finish delivered an important win for Oregon on Saturday. Hairston scored 18 of his 23 points in the second half to lift Oregon to a 73-68 win over No. 24 Arizona. last_img read more

Osteotomy of the knee

first_imgDefinitionOsteotomy of the knee is surgery that involves making a cut in one of the bones in your lower leg. This can be done to relieve symptoms of arthritis.Alternative NamesProximal tibial osteotomy; Lateral closing wedge osteotomy; High tibial osteotomy; Distal femoral osteotomyDescriptionThere are two types of surgery:Tibial osteotomy is surgery done on the shin bone below the knee cap.Femoral osteotomy is surgery done on the thigh bone above the knee cap.During surgery:You will be pain-free during surgery. You may get spinal or epidural anesthesia, along with medicine to help you relax. You may also receive general anesthesia, in which you will be asleep.Your surgeon will make a 4 – 5 inch cut on the area where the osteotomy is being done.The surgeon may remove a wedge of your shinbone from underneath the healthy side of your knee. This is called a closing wedge osteotomy.The surgeon may also open a wedge on the painful side of the knee. This is called an opening wedge osteotomy.Staples, screws, or plates may be used, depending on the type of osteotomy.You may need a bone graft to fill out the wedge.In most cases, the procedure will take 1 – 1 1/2 hours.Why the Procedure Is PerformedOsteotomy of the knee is done to treat symptoms of knee arthritis. It is done when other treatments no longer offer relief.Arthritis most often affects the inside part of the knee. Most of the time, the outside part of the knee is not affected unless you have had a knee injury in the past.advertisementOsteotomy surgery works by shifting the weight away from the damaged part of your knee. For the surgery to be successful, the side of the knee where the weight is being shifted should have little or no arthritis.RisksThe risks for any anesthesia or surgery are:Allergic reactions to medicinesBreathing problemsBleedingInfectionOther risks from this surgery include:Blood clot in the legInjury to a blood vessel or nerveInfection in the knee jointKnee stiffness or a knee joint that is not well-alignedBefore the ProcedureAlways tell your doctor or nurse what drugs you are taking, even drugs, supplements, or herbs you bought without a prescription.During the 2 weeks before your surgery:You may be asked to stop taking drugs that make it harder for your blood to clot. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve), blood thinners such as warfarin (Coumadin), and other drugs.Ask your doctor which drugs you should still take on the day of your surgery.Tell your doctor if you have been drinking a lot of alcohol — more than 1 or 2 drinks a day.If you smoke, try to stop. Ask your doctor for help. Smoking can slow down wound and bone healing.On the day of your surgery:You will usually be asked not to drink or eat anything for 6 to 12 hours before the procedure.Take the drugs your doctor told you to take with a small sip of water.Your doctor or nurse will tell you when to arrive at the hospital.After the ProcedureBy having an osteotomy, you may be able to delay the need for a knee replacement for up to 10 years, but still stay active.A tibial osteotomy may make you look “knock-kneed.” A femoral osteotomy may make you look “bow legged.”Outlook (Prognosis)Your doctor may fit you with a brace to limit how much youre able to move your knee during the recovery period. The brace may also help hold your knee in the correct position.You will need to use crutches for 6 weeks or more. At first, you may be asked to not place any weight on your knee. Ask your doctor when it will be OK to walk with weight on your leg that had the surgery. You will see a physical therapist to help you with an exercise program.Complete recovery may take several months to a year.ReferencesCrenshaw AH. Soft tissue procedures and corrective osteotomies about the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbells Operative Orthopaedics. 12th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 9.Review Date:8/12/2013Reviewed By:C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.last_img read more