O-T-L registration closes Wednesday

first_imgRegistration is now open for the second annual Over the Line tournament, as part of High-on-Ice weekend.It costs $100 per team, for teams of 4-6 players. Registration Packages available at the North Peace Leisure Pool – Register your team by 10:00PM on Wednesday, January 14th, 2009.Taking place on January 17th, OTL is fun, easy to learn, and easy to play. Participants last year had a great time, and more teams are expected this year.- Advertisement -For more info – you can call Byron Stewart at 250-787-7161.The Sweaty Yetis at the 2008 OTL tourneyThe Hazmats at the 2008 OTL tourney – photos courtesy Byron StewartAdvertisementlast_img read more

SA ready for Rea Vaya

first_imgThis Rea Vaya station in Johannesburg will start operating at the end of August. Commuters will now have affordable, safe transportation in and around the city. School children will also benefit immensely from the BRT system as it will cover a number of stops around the city. (Images: Rea Vaya)Khanyi MagubaneSouth Africa’s transport system is set for a major boost when phase one of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system comes into effect on 30 August in Johannesburg, Africa’s leading economic hub.Named Rea Vaya – meaning “we are going” in township slang – the project will start operating at 23 of its 27 stations across greater Johannesburg.About 3.5-million trips are made in the City daily. Of these, 47% are made by public transport including minibus taxis, trains and busses.The system, however, has not been upgraded or improved over the years, resulting in public transport becoming increasingly unreliable and unsafe to use.But, according to Head of Transport in the City of Johannesburg, councillor Rehana Moosajee, the current state of transportation in the City, and the country as a whole, will soon be a thing of the past.“Johannesburg’s commuters will have a first taste of their own world-class public transport system.“We must never forget that BRT is … for the elderly and school children to travel safely, for mothers that need to reach their children speedily and for people with disabilities to have access.”Phase one A, will consist of a main route, known as the trunk route, which will run from the Regina Mundi station in Soweto to Ellis Park East in Johannesburg’s central business district.Supported by four complementary routes, the 143 busses included in the roll out plan will make stops at several key places in the City including University of Johannesburg’s Doornfontein campus, the fashion district, the City’s cultural hub Newtown, the City library and the Johannesburg art gallery.At a media briefing on the progress made on BRT, Moosajee revealed some facts and figures of phase one A of the project;25.5km of dedicated lanes have been constructed, which will serve an estimated 69 000 passengers on a daily basis.3 300 jobs were created during the building phase of Rea Vaya.It’s expected to generate R158-million (US$20-million) in its first year of operation and will use a smart card system, which passengers can reload at approved vendors’ kiosks.One of the attractive features of BRT is its affordability. Bus fares will range between R8 ($1) for a full trip using both the trunk and complementary routes, and R3 (39 cents) for the complementary routs running within the city.Buses will arrive at stations every three minutes during peak hour and every 10 minutes during off peak hours.SA transport new lookThe BRT system is part of the South African government’s plan to overhaul the public transport system in the country, ahead of the upcoming 2010 Fifa World Cup and beyond.BRT has been designed on similar types of public transport models developed in Columbia, France, Australia, Equador and Brazil.In the countries where the system has been tried and tested, BRT benefits cited have been its efficiency and reliability, its friendliness to people living with disabilities and the elderly, as well as its decreased energy consumption and vehicle emissions.Cape Town, Pretoria and Port Elizabeth will also be rolling the BRT system concurrently, and in Cape Town, the system is expected to be operational in March 2010.Roping in the taxi industryOne of the biggest challenges in rolling out the BRT system has been the resistance from the minibus taxi industry, currently Johannesburg’s majority means of transport.The taxi industry’s concerns have been the anticipated major job losses and collapse of the industry when the new BRT system is implemented.  The industry is also concerned with how the new system would fall in line with the government’s taxi recapitalisation programme, which is already underway.The taxi recapitalisation programme, approved in 1999, was set up to reduce the number of old vehicles on the road, as well as introducing a new non-cash based system.Government partnered with the industry to remove old, unroadworthy taxis by offering operators a “scrapping allowance” to replace ageing and unsafe minibus taxis with newer models.According to a survey conducted in 2000, there were approximately 126 000 taxi vehicles in South Africa.Most of the vehicles were at least 10 years old and no longer fit for road use as public transport.Government had planned to spend R7.7-billion ($56-billion) over seven years to finalise the system.In the wake of confusion over the future of the taxi industry, on 24 March, Johannesburg was brought to a standstill when taxi drivers staged a major protest against the new BRT system.Taxis blockaded major highways around the City, causing traffic standstills on various key roads to and from the City.In the wake of the unprecedented move by the taxis, President Jacob Zuma pleaded with the council that Rea Vaya should be put on hold, to give the new administration a chance to acquaint themselves better with the project and the grievances of the taxi industry.Fortunately, significant progress has been made with the industry, represented by the National Taxi Association, Top Six and the Greater Johannesburg Regional Taxi Council.After a steering committee was set up, both the City of Johannesburg and the steering committee have been able to reach some agreements with regards to the future of the taxi industry in Johannesburg. Local taxi operators have now been offered a stake in the new bus operating company as well as a stake in the station management companies.Some taxi drivers will be employed as bus drivers, as well as station managers.Those previously in the taxi industry will also have the opportunity to invest and own companies linked to the BRT system.Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at: [email protected] articlesCape Town’s new bus systemNew infrastructure for the 2010 Fifa World CupFirst glimpse of the GautrainUseful linksRea Vaya City of Johannesburg Scrap Taxilast_img read more

2010 Predictions

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Richard MacManus, Founder & CEO, @rww1. There will be a breakthrough consumer application for Internet of Things – involving the iPhone, RFID tags and a major consumer product such as books or groceries. In general, Internet of Things will ramp up in 2010, with thousands more everyday objects becoming connected to the Internet.2. Google will acquire PostRank and promptly consign it to the same graveyard Feedburner went to.3. Microsoft will acquire Wolfram|Alpha and Bing will continue to make small gains in the search market. Google will be distracted by increasing consumer complaints about content farms polluting Google search results.4. A price war will erupt in the e-book market and Amazon.com will offer the lowest prices, leading to it gaining a dominant position in the market with its Kindle E-book Reader.5. Google will partner with a large PC manufacturer from Asia, which will launch an inexpensive netbook powered by Chrome OS in the U.S. market. It will become a hot consumer item among school kids and university students.Marshall Kirkpatrick, Lead Writer & VP of Content Development, @marshallk1. Google Wave will win some respect back as people discover valuable uses for it and get used to the user experience.2. Facebook will open aggregate-user-profile and social-graph data for outside analysis.3. Some serious user interface innovations will blow our minds.4. Data portability will become more real, standard, expected and viable.5. A new social network will rise to join the big ones. It may offer the privacy that Facebook is moving away from; it may be mobile and location-centric; it may focus on personal content recommendations.Sarah Perez, Feature Writer, @sarahintampa1. MySpace doesn’t quite make a comeback, but gets a fresh start of sorts with its music and entertainment offerings. The Gen Y/Gen Z demographic sees growth on the site but the network’s overall numbers continue to decline.2. Twitter launches ads. 3. TweetDeck finally launches a web version and becomes the number one Twitter client other than Twitter.com. 4. Cloud computing heats up. AWS, Google, Microsoft and others begin price wars to compete for customers. 5. The iPhone still rules and grabs more mobile market share than ever before. 6. Meanwhile, Android becomes the number two mobile platform by year-end. 7. iPhone app backlash begins. There are too many worthless apps and no decent way to find the good ones. Then Apple surprises us with a brand-new feature that improves greatly upon their “genius” offering to help us find new and useful apps via iTunes. 8. iTunes announces a web service, thanks to the Lala acquisition. 9. Spotify finally gets the green light in U.S. and people go nuts for it. 10. The netbook craze dies down. People start buying new “in-between” devices that are slightly larger and more powerful than today’s netbooks, but smaller, more lightweight and cheaper than regular notebooks. Features like better processors, separate GPUs and SSD HD options set these new “ultra portable” devices apart from the traditional netbook, but they’re still often called “netbooks” because of their size. Market confusion ensues. Jolie O’Dell, Writer & Community Manager, @jolieodell1. MySpace relaunches as a content network, leveraging the bands and filmmakers they already have on board and dropping the emphasis on social networking.2. Twitter will find a monetization model and launch things like ads and pro features.3. Facebook will become the Borg. Its number of users will continue to climb until the network is as ubiquitous as Google and lay people confuse Facebook with “the Internet.” They’ll make more money and control more data than ever before.4. iPhone’s exclusivity with AT&T will come to a breaking point and we’ll see network-agnostic iPhones.5. On the bright side, 2010 will signal the death of the login. Third-party authentications will become the norm, and user data will be entrusted to a discrete handful of online properties. Users will pitch a hissyfit if ever they’re asked to create a username and password and upload an avatar. After all, doesn’t the Internet know they have a Facebook?6. File-sharing will continue to be shut down around the world; by 2011, we’ll all be downloading via Tor and the U.S. will have instituted a lame three-strikes-no-Internet policy.7. Cybercrime will be more of an issue than ever. Expect to see a major governmental security breach in 2010, as the government continues to adopt 2.0 tech without strong and permanent infosec personnel and procedures in place.Dana Oshiro, ReadWriteStart Writer, @SuzyPerplexus1. AR: Geo-locational games and AR will come together in 2010. We’re going to see strange behavior from those playing zombie shooter games on their commutes.2. Agree with Sarah: Netbooks and gadgets like the PsiXpda are going to gain ground.3. Mobile Music: Offline music caching will be expected of all streaming music apps.4. The browser really will be the new OS.5. Payment Systems: Between Square, PayPal X and advances in Internet TV, we’re going to see payment options integrated in unlikely places.Alex Williams, ReadWriteEnterprise Writer, @podcasthotel1. Cloud computing will go through a shake out. There are just too many companies out there for the market to sustain. The big players will go on a buying spree. The consolidation will deeply affect users. Some companies will fold overnight. Users will lose access to their data, leading to a whole new wave of skepticism about cloud computing. But it won’t be enough to slow down the move to cloud computing. More companies will consider the security risks as less of a factor, compared to the cost benefits and potential for innovation. Cloud computing technology will become more of a commodity. The business applications for cloud computing will take center stage.2. The big players will come back strong. IBM, SAP and Microsoft will innovate just enough to show big gains with customers.3. Consumer-based social networks will make big efforts to gain wider access to the enterprise, as more companies seek to open up to the social Web. The information architecture of social networks will change to accommodate the greater degrees of control that the enterprise requires. This will bring on the rise of “social middleware” – services that act as a layer between social networks and the enterprise.4. A new breed of social networks will emerge that act as one-stop shops for applications and services. These will look more like marketplaces than social hubs for conversations around the proverbial virtual water cooler. SaaS leaders will face off for this growing market.5. iPhone, Android or the Blackberry? I expect the Android to be the talk of the enterprise, especially if the Google Phone does make it to market. Such a phone would eliminate carrier costs and break down walled gardens that have limited application development.Sean Ammirati, COO, @SeanAmmirati1. Facebook will go public and the IPO will be a huge financial success. 2. Hyperlocal advertising will heat up, delivering another nail in the traditional newspaper industry’s coffin. (Very similar to one of my 2008 predictions, but this time focused on the advertising aspects.) Specifically, it will be more common for a local establishment to pay marketing dollars to Yelp or FourSquare, for example, then their local newspaper. 3. Apple will release an “iTablet” and the world will be a better place for it. OK, more accurately we’ll all think the world is a better place for it.4. Agree with Jolie regarding “the death of the login.” I’m hoping for open distributed alternatives along with Facebook and a handful of others. 5. Between Boxee’s continued development and a new AppleTV (hopefully synched with their iTablet), it will become much more common to enjoy the Internet on a TV.Elyssa Pallai, Marketing & Experience Manager, @boulderservices1. Skype becomes increasingly pervasive, as the younger generations force their parents to get online, and consumers find new and interesting ways to cut costs and save money.2. Software as service becomes ever more popular, as businesses and governments choose to focus on their core business and realize the benefits of lightweight technologies in the cloud – including rapid deployment and the low cost of switching.3. The online user experience has a renaissance, as web browsers and hardware become more sophisticated and designers and developers take advantage of that.4. The growth of Internet of Things continues, RFID tags in everything. The initial bugs will make funny things happen all around us.5. iPhones and other smartphones become the purchasing tool of choice.6. Consumers bypass carriers and create open wifi networks for all (which is already happening but not en mass).Jared Smith, Webmaster, @jaredwsmith1. Backlash against the App Store causes more and more developers to defect to Android and competing platforms.2. Google Chrome’s market share increases at Firefox’s expense. Internet Explorer continues to lose ground as more rich, HTML5-aware Web apps spring up on the scene.3. Opera begins to struggle, as WebKit becomes the rendering engine of choice on mobile devices.4. Social analytics features explode onto the scene in 2010. Twitter opens Pro accounts, including analytics and an API to access them. Google strikes a deal to integrate Twitter analytics with its Google Analytics product. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… richard macmanus Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Every year the ReadWriteWeb team tries its hand at predicting the future. Looking back at our 2009 predictions, we got some wrong (I predicted that Facebook would sign up to OpenSocial) but others turned out to be on the money. I correctly guessed that the usual suspects would remain unacquired in ’09 – Digg, Twitter, Technorati – but that FriendFeed would get bought. OK, so I guessed that Google would be the buyer. But close enough!Without further ado, here are our predictions for 2010. We’d love to read your predictions in the comments.SEE ALSO: ReadWriteWeb’s 2009 Year in Review. This series features our readers’ picks for the top products of 2009, our editorial selections for the best BigCo and best LittleCo of ’09, and our most promising company for 2010. Tags:#2009 in Review#Features#predictions#web#Year in Review Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts last_img read more

The Hustler’s Playbook: Be Authentic

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now You do not need to wait for someone to give you permission to be the real and authentic version of yourself. You don’t need anyone else’s approval or their blessing to become what you must become. Withholding who you are is to withhold your gifts, your truth, your contribution. You have all the permission you will ever need now.You don’t need to imitate anyone else. You don’t need to be a pale copy of a brighter original. You don’t need to succumb to the fear that you are somehow not enough and that it would be better to be like someone else (or to be that someone). You are enough.You also don’t need to be a derivation. You don’t need to be “the next” anyone or anything. Your truth is your own. Living someone else’s truth is to live a lie. Your interpretation is as valid as anyone else’s. No one else’s way is your way.You have to believe in yourself. You have to believe that your truth is enough, that your contribution is enough, that you are enough. The doubt you feel is the fear of being judged by others. It’s what happens when you live in a society that judges, that separates us from each other. Your belief in yourself has to be strong enough to overcome your fear of being judged.You have to have the confidence to act. You have to believe that you have the right to live your truth, even when those around you will work to make you believe that you don’t. Some would have you believe it’s safer to conform, to turn down your light, or extinguish it completely. But the real danger isn’t acting; it’s not acting and wasting the time you have been given.You have to rely on yourself. You have to trust yourself, your intuition, and your instincts. You have to believe that you alone can do what must be done and that you can make a difference. You have to be the one that you count on.Your mission and vision are your own. Your purpose is your own, and you decide what that purpose is. Your time is short. Make the most of it. Today is day one.last_img read more

BC taxi group urges province to take slow and cautious route on

first_imgVANCOUVER – The B.C. Taxi Association says it has found an app to meet customer demands across the province, making the need for ride sharing services like Uber and Lyft unnecessary.But an Uber spokesman said Monday hundreds of thousands of people in B.C. have already accessed their app in the search for reliable and affordable services.The association and Uber are among numerous industry representatives and experts who are appearing before an all-party legislature committee this week in Vancouver on the future of ride-hailing services in the province.Taxi association president Mohan Kang said ride-sharing services could “destroy” the taxi industry and put drivers out of work.He told the committee a single ride-sharing app that allows people to book rides should be approved by the government. The association is endorsing an app called Kater, developed in B.C., that would be used by taxi companies.“I believe it will serve the consumers better if there’s one app,” Kang said, adding that a single app would also prevent the oversupply of taxis.“If there are too many, then it will become like a deregulated state. There has to be some sort of cap to ensure the guys are making enough money for (their) livelihood.”The Green party has been pushing for ride sharing, but the NDP and Liberals have said further study is needed to look at the impact on the industry.Green Leader Andrew Weaver said ride sharing in B.C. is long overdue.“There’s no question we are lagging the rest of the world,” said Weaver, who is a member of the committee. “Vancouver is the only major jurisdiction in all of North America, and one of the few in the world, that does not have some form of riding-hailing.”Michael van Hemmen, public policy manager with Uber Canada, told the committee there is huge demand for reliable and affordable ride sharing.“Since 2015, over half a million residents and tourists have downloaded or opened the app here in British Columbia,” he said.The company wants the province to implement regulations similar to those previously proposed by Weaver in the legislature that would allow ride sharing to operate in B.C.“A provincial framework is key because there is no reason there should be different safety rules or restrictions in each of the 20-plus municipalities across Metro Vancouver or dozen municipalities in the capital (Victoria) region,” van Hemmen said.Taxis and ride sharing have managed to co-exist in other markets, van Hemmen said, and the service could come to B.C. if regulatory changes are made to insurance policies, drivers licence requirements and vehicle inspection standards.“Ride sharing won’t happen unless there is a workable insurance product,” he said.The company wants an insurance system that would allow personal vehicles to be insured as commercial vehicles only for the duration — measured by distance — that a ride is being provided.Drivers would only need a standard licence, rather than a commercial-class licence, to provide rides and the rigour of vehicle inspections should reflect the occasional nature of ride sharing, van Hemmen said.The B.C. Taxi Association said if ride-sharing services are allowed to operate, they need to be held to the same regulatory standards as taxi companies. Kang said there should also be a standardized base rate to create a fair playing field for all operators.Representatives from the ride-sharing service Lyft are also scheduled to make their case to the committee. The hearings will continue through Wednesday and a report is expected to be released next month.— Follow @Givetash on Twitter.last_img read more