OMBUDSMAN CONFIRMS: NO EVIDENCE OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR BY TRAGIC GARDA

first_imgTHE GARDA Ombudsman has confirmed its investigation into a garda sergeant who took his own life “found no evidence of criminal behaviour or a breach of discipline”.A file on Sgt Mick Galvin confirming this was due to be sent to the Director of Public Prosecutions as a matter of procedure.But no-one told Sgt Galvin – and last Thursday he took his own life at Ballyshannon Garda Station. The father of three had feared prosecution and the loss of the job he loved. His widow Colette said he “lived” for his job and had been subjected to a “horrendous” Ombudsman investigation.However the Ombudsman has confirmed today that Sgt Galvin had been cleared – with the letter to the DPP a formality.There is considerable anger in Donegal, Leitrim and Sligo over the death.The Ombudsman has decided to have the case examined by an external auditor, possibly a retired judge. Sgt Galvin was interviewed under caution on May 20, and a decision to recommend no prosecution was taken just days before his death.He was laid to rest in St Claire’s cemetery in Manorhamilton on Sunday where Colette Galvin received a standing ovation from hundreds of gardai in attendance. OMBUDSMAN CONFIRMS: NO EVIDENCE OF CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR BY TRAGIC GARDA was last modified: June 2nd, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:deathOMBUDSMANSgt Mick Galvinlast_img read more

A’s announce special events for 2019; the 5 you don’t want to miss

first_imgOnce upon there was Bat Day. Only Bat Day. Then came Ball Day. Then Cap Day, then Helmet Day. Then (Your City Here) Night. Then came Picture Day, where you could snap photographs of players as they milled around between the foul lines and the grandstand.Anyone else jonesing for the ’70s right about now?It was a simpler time. Not necessarily perfect. I visited relatives in Southern California one summer. We went to a few Angels games. At one, I was too old to get a bat. At another, I was too …last_img read more

SA ready for Rea Vaya

first_imgThis Rea Vaya station in Johannesburg will start operating at the end of August. Commuters will now have affordable, safe transportation in and around the city. School children will also benefit immensely from the BRT system as it will cover a number of stops around the city. (Images: Rea Vaya)Khanyi MagubaneSouth Africa’s transport system is set for a major boost when phase one of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system comes into effect on 30 August in Johannesburg, Africa’s leading economic hub.Named Rea Vaya – meaning “we are going” in township slang – the project will start operating at 23 of its 27 stations across greater Johannesburg.About 3.5-million trips are made in the City daily. Of these, 47% are made by public transport including minibus taxis, trains and busses.The system, however, has not been upgraded or improved over the years, resulting in public transport becoming increasingly unreliable and unsafe to use.But, according to Head of Transport in the City of Johannesburg, councillor Rehana Moosajee, the current state of transportation in the City, and the country as a whole, will soon be a thing of the past.“Johannesburg’s commuters will have a first taste of their own world-class public transport system.“We must never forget that BRT is … for the elderly and school children to travel safely, for mothers that need to reach their children speedily and for people with disabilities to have access.”Phase one A, will consist of a main route, known as the trunk route, which will run from the Regina Mundi station in Soweto to Ellis Park East in Johannesburg’s central business district.Supported by four complementary routes, the 143 busses included in the roll out plan will make stops at several key places in the City including University of Johannesburg’s Doornfontein campus, the fashion district, the City’s cultural hub Newtown, the City library and the Johannesburg art gallery.At a media briefing on the progress made on BRT, Moosajee revealed some facts and figures of phase one A of the project;25.5km of dedicated lanes have been constructed, which will serve an estimated 69 000 passengers on a daily basis.3 300 jobs were created during the building phase of Rea Vaya.It’s expected to generate R158-million (US$20-million) in its first year of operation and will use a smart card system, which passengers can reload at approved vendors’ kiosks.One of the attractive features of BRT is its affordability. Bus fares will range between R8 ($1) for a full trip using both the trunk and complementary routes, and R3 (39 cents) for the complementary routs running within the city.Buses will arrive at stations every three minutes during peak hour and every 10 minutes during off peak hours.SA transport new lookThe BRT system is part of the South African government’s plan to overhaul the public transport system in the country, ahead of the upcoming 2010 Fifa World Cup and beyond.BRT has been designed on similar types of public transport models developed in Columbia, France, Australia, Equador and Brazil.In the countries where the system has been tried and tested, BRT benefits cited have been its efficiency and reliability, its friendliness to people living with disabilities and the elderly, as well as its decreased energy consumption and vehicle emissions.Cape Town, Pretoria and Port Elizabeth will also be rolling the BRT system concurrently, and in Cape Town, the system is expected to be operational in March 2010.Roping in the taxi industryOne of the biggest challenges in rolling out the BRT system has been the resistance from the minibus taxi industry, currently Johannesburg’s majority means of transport.The taxi industry’s concerns have been the anticipated major job losses and collapse of the industry when the new BRT system is implemented.  The industry is also concerned with how the new system would fall in line with the government’s taxi recapitalisation programme, which is already underway.The taxi recapitalisation programme, approved in 1999, was set up to reduce the number of old vehicles on the road, as well as introducing a new non-cash based system.Government partnered with the industry to remove old, unroadworthy taxis by offering operators a “scrapping allowance” to replace ageing and unsafe minibus taxis with newer models.According to a survey conducted in 2000, there were approximately 126 000 taxi vehicles in South Africa.Most of the vehicles were at least 10 years old and no longer fit for road use as public transport.Government had planned to spend R7.7-billion ($56-billion) over seven years to finalise the system.In the wake of confusion over the future of the taxi industry, on 24 March, Johannesburg was brought to a standstill when taxi drivers staged a major protest against the new BRT system.Taxis blockaded major highways around the City, causing traffic standstills on various key roads to and from the City.In the wake of the unprecedented move by the taxis, President Jacob Zuma pleaded with the council that Rea Vaya should be put on hold, to give the new administration a chance to acquaint themselves better with the project and the grievances of the taxi industry.Fortunately, significant progress has been made with the industry, represented by the National Taxi Association, Top Six and the Greater Johannesburg Regional Taxi Council.After a steering committee was set up, both the City of Johannesburg and the steering committee have been able to reach some agreements with regards to the future of the taxi industry in Johannesburg. Local taxi operators have now been offered a stake in the new bus operating company as well as a stake in the station management companies.Some taxi drivers will be employed as bus drivers, as well as station managers.Those previously in the taxi industry will also have the opportunity to invest and own companies linked to the BRT system.Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at: [email protected] articlesCape Town’s new bus systemNew infrastructure for the 2010 Fifa World CupFirst glimpse of the GautrainUseful linksRea Vaya City of Johannesburg Scrap Taxilast_img read more

FNB pours R40-million into local football

first_imgFNB is contributing in developingSouth Africa’s future football stars. FNB’s Derek Carstens, right, handingover an R18-million cheque to Safa. Legends Kalusha Bwalya and LucasRadebe are programme ambassadors.(Images: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• Mphilo DlaminiCorporate CommunicationsFNB+27 11 371 8381Bongani NkosiFirst National Bank, one of South Africa’s four major banks, will invest R40-million (US$5.8-million) in developing the country’s young footballers over the next few years.The bank will sponsor the national under-17 boys and girls teams, as well as school football tournaments. It’s already built four pitches in as many communities, and another will be finished in 2011.FNB’s investment was announced to the media on 9 December in Nasrec, Johannesburg. It is part of the bank’s legacy programme following the recent 2010 Fifa World Cup, into which it pumped R30-million ($4.3-million).“We’re happy to announce this, especially at a time when I can assure you that things are not easy in corporate South Africa,” said FNB brand director Derek Carstens.The government and the South African Football Association (Safa) praised the bank for its pledge.The biggest chunk of the sponsorship will go to the under 17-boys and girls teams, respectively known as Amajimbos and Abantwana. FNB has already channelled R18-million ($2.6-million) into these teams, which are eyeing spots in the next Fifa World Cups for their age group.“The key objective we’ve set ourselves is that Amajimbos and Abantwana qualify for the World Cup in 2012 and 2013,” Carstens said.FNB has been involved with the Amajimbos for a number of years now, but the Abantwana sponsorship is a new venture. “We look at male and female sports as equally important,” he added.Bringing the Beautiful Game back to schoolsThe FNB Festivals are tipped to become the next biggest fad in school football. A total of 162 schools will participate in the inaugural event in 2011, after which it will become an annual fixture.Twenty schools will battle it out in the Lucas Radebe Tribute Festival, which is the Soweto leg of the competition in south-west Johannesburg. St Davids Marist in Sandton, also in Johannesburg, will see 42 schools slugging it out for glory.Grey College in Bloemfontein will host 20 schools, while a further 32 schools will use Durban’s Kloof High School as their battlefield. Victoria Park and Benoni High, schools located in Port Elizabeth and east of Johannesburg respectively, will each host 16 school teams.The schools competition is viewed as a great way to get pupils back into the swing of the Beautiful Game. Local football experts agree that the sport has long lost its ground in both urban and rural schools, which has impacted negatively on talent development. This is blamed for the current under-performance of national squads.“Our football in schools, I must say, is dead,” said Serame Letsoaka, Safa’s technical director. “This is where we tapped in for talent.“Thank you FNB for creating this opportunity to go back to schools.”R15-million on turfsThe bank channelled about R15-million ($2.2-million) into the development of football pitches before the 2010 Fifa World Cup. The pitches were created in Thohoyandou in Limpopo, Pietermaritzburg in KwaZulu-Natal, Mthatha in the Eastern Cape and George in the Western Cape.A pitch in Kimberley, Northern Cape, will be completed by June in 2011, the bank said.Community leagues will play their matches here, and may also host touring international junior teams. “We’re looking at teams like Boca Juniors of Argentina to bring their under-17s to play at the turfs,” said Carstens.Carstens said they have partnered with local municipalities in the areas to maintain the grounds.Coaches will be groomed for all the venues. Letsoaka, a coach himself, is excited about coaching clinics that will be run at the pitches. “We have been saying, let’s produce developmental coaches. These are the areas where we’ll develop coaches,” he said.Lucas Radebe, the former Bafana and Leeds United captain, has been appointed the ambassador of FNB’s legacy programme and he’ll oversee activities on the pitches.Intensifying Soccer Classic ClashesThe bank’s Soccer Classic Clashes competition, which was launched in Nelspruit, Mpumalanga, in 2007, will also be extended. Starting in 2011, there will be far more venues and matches than in previous years, according to FNB.Minister of Sports and Recreation Fikile Mbalula said: “This legacy programme will impact on thousands of lives. A number of Bafana Bafana and Banyana Banyana (national male and female teams) will be drawn from this programme.”last_img read more

Connecting pregnant women to vital information

first_img22 August 2014The Department of Health has launched a new mobile phone-based messaging service to provide South Africa’s estimated 1.2-million pregnant women with free antenatal health care information.The department will seek to register as many pregnant women as possible with the SMS service, MomConnect, which will both provide information and advice on pregnancy as well as notify the department about poor service.Launching the service at Soshanguve Multipurpose Community Centre outside Pretoria on Thursdasy, Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi said the service would advise women on what to do at any stage of their pregnancy and also encourage them to start ante-natal care at an early stage.“We will say, Mom, since you registered with us you are now 13 weeks pregnant, this is what you must do, this is where you must go and this is what you must avoid.“Even after the birth of the baby, we will continue to send the messages for the period of one year. The messages will include advice on the baby, this is what you must do, this is what the baby must get.”He said pregnant women would also be able to send messages to the department to criticise or compliment the services they had received.“In a particular period, we will be able to know from here in Pretoria that in the past six months that most of the messages that are bad were coming from a particular clinic.”The R59-million project will be funded for the first two years by the US government, which is providing R49-million, and Johnson & Johnson and ELMA Philanthropies, each of whom contributed R5-million.The department, with the help of its partners, has trained 10 300 health workers nationally to help pregnant women to register for MomConnect and to provide associated services.“In the coming weeks, every health facility in the country will have at least one person who is trained and whose job will be to assist and register pregnant women,” Motsoaledi said.Mobile operators Vodacom, MTN, Cell C and Telkom are providing a 50% discount on SMS’s sent to pregnant mothers as part of the service.Pregnant mothers and health workers at the Motubatse Clinic in Soshanguve welcomed the initiative on Thursday. Pregnant mother Patricia Mokese, who is already registered, said the project would help them with their check-up dates, since this could be confusing.“We have lot on our mind at home and work, and sometimes we forget to go to the clinics on time,” said Mokese, who is expecting her second child. “The project will help us, especially when something you don’t understand happens to you during the pregnancy. We can send a message for assistance.”Sister Innocentia Hlongwane, who works at the mother and child ward in the clinic, said MomConnect would help expecting mothers to book their appointments early and provide them with information ahead of time.“We can get early bookings for antenatal care,” Hlongwane said. “It will also reduce the risk of the maternal rate and help us as health workers because they will already know the warning signs if there is an emergency.”Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Quickly Turn Your Blog Into an Android App with Feed.nu

first_imgLooking for a quick and easy way to get an app into the Android Market, but don’t have the time, skills, or money to develop one? Feed.nu can help.The site offers a way for you to make your own app, ready for the Market, in just a few minutes. Once you sign up for a Feed.nu account and upload your feed info, you’re able to download a .apk that you can, in turn, upload to the Android Market. That step requires an Android Market developer account (and that will set you back $25), and honestly, it seems to take more time to get your screenshots and high-resolution icons in order for the Market application and upload than it does to actually use the Feed.nu tool. You can blog directly into the Feed.nu interface (it’s simply a hosted WordPress blog), and edit your posts there, should you choose. As it’s based on your RSS feed, the app will update as you update your blog.It’s still in beta, but it’s a fully-functioning beta, so check it out. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#mobile#web Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement audrey watterslast_img read more