Reno rumble: One of Brisbane’s oldest homes brought back to life

first_imgThe original Paddington homestead known as ‘Rockbourne’ has been renovated.BEYOND its overgrown and tired facade, the 1870s farmhouse was a piece of Brisbane’s history waiting to be brought back to life.When the Barnes family first set eyes on ‘Rockbourne’ in 2004, they knew they had found something special.The property at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, is one of the original homesteads in the iconic Ithaca Precinct.RELATED: Extravagant home taken from dated to daringPerched on a huge 1480 sqm block, the north-facing, elevated home was ripe for renovation, so the Barnes’s embarked on a labour of love.BEFORE: The front of the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The front of the house after it was renovated.“What was most important to us was that we maintained the integrity and history of the home,” owner Michelle Barnes said.“We agreed we would not rush into getting everything done or compromise on quality construction and finishes.“Instead, we took the approach that we would renovate as we could afford it.”So, they met with an architect, an arborist, a landscape designer and a builder to first plan the overall vision.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:59Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:59 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen5 tips to find the perfect flip00:59BEFORE: The back of the property at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The back of the property is unrecognisable after the renovation.After six months of planning, the mission was clear: to rejuvenate the historical Queenslander by kitting it out with classic, yet modern amenities, while staying true to its grace and charm.They restored the traditional facade, 12 foot ceilings, timber floors, doors, stained glass panels and fireplace, but added modern touches to make it more entertainment-friendly.MORE: This is what you get for a lazy $3m“We love cooking and holding dinner parties for friends and family so having a large kitchen with plenty of benchspace, ovens and cooktops and storage plus a large dining area was a priority — as was the outdoor entertainment area with a barbecue and a pizza oven,” Ms Barnes said.“It’s a home with so many beautiful memories, both with our family and those who lived here before us.”BEFORE: The living room inside the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The living room after it was renovated.They installed a new kitchen, complete with butler’s pantry, Subzero fridge, Vintec wine fridges, marble benchtops, hand painted cabinetry and European appliances.The new dining room is accented by Spotted Gum finishes and adjoins a large living room.There are six bedrooms, including a master bedroom with a dressing room and ensuite.The three bathrooms are accented by marble finishes and hand-crafted cabinetry, with the main bathroom boasting a cast-iron clawfoot bath.Downstairs, there is a rumpus room, decorated in Crema Pacifica honed marble flooring and bifold doors.This space is also ideal for a teenager/guest retreat or potentially self-contained granny flat style accommodation.BEFORE: A glimpse of the kitchen inside the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, before it was renovated.AFTER: The kitchen after it was renovated.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus11 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market11 hours agoOutside, the Barnes’s installed a 9m x 4.5m saltwater swimming pool, surrounded by trees and landscaped gardens.One of the statement features of the property is the state-of-the-art alfresco pavilion by the pool, which is perfect for gatherings and includes an outdoor cinema for movie nights.A block of land this size is a rarity in Paddington, and also accommodates a cosy firepit, vegetable gardens, citrus trees and a chicken coop.BEFORE: The original kitchen and dining area during the renovation.AFTER: The kitchen and dining area after the renovation.But the hidden hero of the home is a sunlit study with floor-to-ceiling library, opening onto the wrap-around balcony.“It’s the smallest of all the rooms, but is beautifully lit throughout the day,” Ms Barnes said. “Surrounded by my books, arranged in floor-to-ceiling shelves, I never tire of reading or working in the study.“It overlooks the vegetable gardens, down the veranda and out to the city and receives the most delightful breezes.”BEFORE: A downstairs rumpus room in the original house before the renovation.AFTER: The wine cellar in the house at 118 Kennedy Tce, Paddington, after the reno.The property is being offered for sale by Tyson Clarke of Queensland Sotheby’s International Realty.RENO FACT CHECK:Time taken: 15 yearsTotal spend: Can’t put a price on itVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:20Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:20 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen6 Australian wow homes that have just sold01:20last_img read more

Outsource Our Energy Woes to the Microbes

first_imgDo we need to dig for oil forever?  Do we need to fret and fume over energy policy as more consumers compete for decreasing resources?  What if there were a virtually inexhaustible supply right under our noses?  That’s what the American Society for Microbiology asked in a press release reproduced by EurekAlert.  “The answer to one of the world’s largest problems – the need for clean, renewable sources of energy – might just come from some of the world’s smallest inhabitants – bacteria,” it teased.  Why reinvent the wheel, when microbes already know how to get fuel from the sun and other readily-available resources?  Some day, the article continues, you may be shopping for some really cool gadgets for the home:Imagine the future of energy.  The future might look like a new power plant on the edge of town – an inconspicuous bioreactor that takes in yard waste and locally-grown crops like corn and woodchips, and churns out electricity to area homes and businesses,” says Judy Wall of the University of Missouri – Columbia, one of the authors of the report.    Or the future may take the form of a stylish-looking car that refills its tank at hydrogen stations.  “Maybe the future of energy looks like a device on the roof of your home – a small appliance, connected to the household electric system, that uses sunlight and water to produce the electricity that warms your home, cooks your food, powers your television and washes your clothes.  All these futuristic energy technologies may become reality some day, thanks to the work of the smallest living creatures on earth: microorganisms,” Wall says.The study of microbial fuels is in its infancy, and current products are not yet cost-effective.  But the potential is enormous.  Microbes already know how to make “numerous fuels including ethanol, hydrogen, methane and butanol.”  They can also convert food sources directly into electricity.    Farmers and gardeners can look forward to a bright future, too, once scientists learn the secrets of low-energy nitrogen fixation mastered by bacteria.  EurekAlert reported that scientists are making progress understanding how the amazing machines called nitrogenases work.  Dinitrogen molecules are the toughest nuts to crack because of their triple bonds.  Man’s method (the Haber process), used to make ammonia fertilizer, is costly and energy-intensive.  Somehow, nitrogenase splits these tightly-bound atoms apart with ease at room temperature.  If we can figure out how bacteria achieve this feat, and replicate it, the economic boom that might result – with benefits for solving world hunger – can only be imagined.    By the way, when planning your future biotechnology home, with its termite air conditioning system (09/21/2004), don’t forget the worms (09/14/2004) for clean and efficient garbage disposal.  No worries; it will be a cinch to order whatever you need from your spinach cell phone (09/21/2004).This is what science ought to be doing.  Millions of people are starving in Africa and Asia and South America under totalitarian governments or superstitious shamans, and all some American and European scientists can think about is how to fight creationism and push Darwin dogma down people’s parched throats.  Sir Francis Bacon envisioned a science that improved people’s lives.  To distinguish good science from bad science, he appealed to Jesus’ proverb, “By their fruits you shall know them.”  Solomon said, “Abundant food is in the fallow ground of the poor, but it is swept away by injustice” (Proverbs 13:23).  It’s time for some justice in modern science.  What has Darwinism brought us other than confusion (11/15/06), dogmatism (11/05/06) and genocide (11/30/2005)?    If you are a researcher or scientist working on ethically-sound biotechnology or biomimetics, God bless you!  Inspire your students.  There are secrets in the living world that can meet some of the world’s most pressing physical needs if we will just learn about them and apply them.  We are poised with new technologies to make a huge difference.  Look what the Christian creationist George Washington Carver was able to accomplish, and that was over half a century ago, before computers and genomes and nanotechnology.  Where are the Carvers of the information and biotechnology age?  Abundant resources, like acres of diamonds, lie all around us.  Imagine culling bountiful crops of healthy food out of desert sand, or generating non-polluting fuels from sunlight and weeds.  Imagine new ways to fight pathogens with biological tricks, to desalinate oceans and purify scarce water supplies.  Apply your intelligent design to the intelligent design impressed in living things.  Let’s get science back on track and make a difference.  Our microbial servants are there to help.(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

60% of Facebook Users Consider Quitting Over Privacy? We Think Not

first_imgTags:#Facebook#NYT#privacy#web The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos PC World is reporting this morning on a survey from IT security firm Sophos that says that “60% of Facebook users consider quitting over privacy”.But we have one question – does anyone really believe that 300 million of the now estimated 500 million Facebook users are actually considering quitting?In total, 1,860 visitors to the Sophos website responded to “an online poll asking Facebook users if privacy concerns might make them consider quitting the service”, according to the company’s blog post. Of those, 272 answers were removed from respondents who said they were not Facebook users, and 254 said they had already left the site over privacy concerns. Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification How can we look at these numbers? First, there are the basic numbers. As we reported earlier this week, Facebook experienced a 3% increase in visits last week, receiving nearly 9% of all U.S. visits. Not to mention, that oft-quoted figure of 400 million users has grown, though not officially announced yet, to 500 million. We think that another informal survey from Forrester Research may shed some light on what is going on here. According to Forrester analyst Augie Ray, it wasn’t his survey’s final results (with its way-too-small sample of 185 respondents) that were most interesting, but how who he asked affected the answers. In his poll, he asked “Have you changed your behaviors or settings in Facebook as a result of recent news about the site’s privacy settings & breaches?”At first, I invited followers on Twitter, and those early responses tended toward the concerned; the Twitter crowd demonstrated a higher percentage deleting their accounts or changing their privacy settings. But later I shared my poll with my Facebook friends, which include many people not “in the business” of marketing, technology, or social media, and as this group responded, I noted a significant jump in other responses, primarily, “I’ve made no changes whatsoever in how I use Facebook.” All of this is not to say that Facebook is not going through some serious issues over its privacy settings. Since we first reported on Quit Facebook Day – the site where people can pledge to delete their Facebook account on May 31 – the number of pledges has grown to nearly 13,000 – nearly triple what it was when we revisited the site early this week.With all of this in mind, we think that 60% is an overblown statistic that is likely a result of the same fault found by Augie Ray when polling his online following – the answer changes and widely varies depending on who you ask. As the disclaimer on the Sophos blog post reads, “Please bear in mind that this poll is not scientific and is provided for information purposes only. Sophos makes no guarantees about the accuracy of the results other than that they reflect the choices of the users who participated.”This un-scientific survey is giving un-scientific results that are being tossed around as if they actually mean something. Instead of reading “60% of Facebook users” it should read “60% of visitors to IT security firm Sophos’ website who use Facebook”. Then, maybe, it would be presented in the correct context for us to understand what’s being measured. Facebook’s privacy flap – though a concern for the mainstream, too (as evidenced by a cover story on Time Magazine, among other things) – is primarily worrisome for the technically savvy. There are not 300,000,000 Facebook users considering dumping the world’s most popular social network. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… mike melanson Related Posts A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Valcourt attacks Confederacy of Nations calls chiefs rogue and threats to national

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsAboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt moved aggressively to undermine the Confederacy of Nations Thursday, labeling the chiefs behind the organization as rogues who are “threatening” national security.The Confederacy of Nations, a governing body within the Assembly of First Nations, met for the first time in 10 years this week in Ottawa. The Confederacy passed a motion rejecting Bill C-33, the First Nation Control of First Nations Education Act, and set out a plan to request a meeting with Valcourt on education.Valcourt launched the attack in the House of Commons after facing questions from NDP MP Jean Crowder over whether he was ready to meet with the Confederacy of Nations.“The members of the House will agree that we should, as members, condemn in the strongest terms the threat of those rogue chiefs who are threatening the security of Canadians, their families and tax-payers,” said Valcourt, during question period.Earlier this week, the Confederacy warned of shutting down the Canadian economy if Ottawa continued to impose legislation on First Nations. It also circulated a draft declaration seeking to negotiate an education accord with Ottawa.The draft declaration was sent back to the communities for additional discussion, said Anishinabek Nation Grand Council Chief Patrick Madahbee. The draft will be shared with community members before it’s brought back to a special AFN chiefs assembly in Ottawa on May 27 for amendments and adoption, said Madahbee.Valcourt, however, seized on the draft document in an attempt to undermine the Confederacy, which is accountable to the AFN chiefs, but has oversight powers over the AFN executive and the national chief“I will meet with these people when they unequivocally withdraw their threat to the security of Canadian families, taxpayers and citizens,” said Valcourt. “I don’t believe these chiefs represent the majority of the chiefs and councils throughout Canada and who care about reconciliation and who care about their children and their education.”Valcourt said he hoped that the “good working and good willing chiefs” would speak up against the Confederacy.Crowder, who is the NDP’s Aboriginal affairs critic, said Valcourt, “like other Conservatives is too willing to smear anyone who opposes” his agenda.APTN National News asked the minister’s office to clarify his statement regarding the “rogue chiefs” but there was no response to the request.The Confederacy meeting was triggered by Ontario chiefs who represent one of the largest populations of Indigenous peoples in the country. First Nation leaders from Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories also attended the Confederacy meeting which met in a church basement on Wednesday.Ontario regional Chief Stan Beardy said the meeting, which he requested before Shawn Atleo resigned as national chief, needed to happen because First Nation people faced a crisis over education after the introduction of Bill C-33.Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Grand Chief Derek Nepinak said Valcourt was spreading misinformation.“I think the minister is purposely playing into the hands of that segment of the population that can be easily mislead that we are about blockades, that we are about threats,” said Nepinak. “We are not about that at all, we came here to talk about education.”Beardy said no decision had been made on the draft declaration and he would follow the will of the chiefs.“I take my direction for the chiefs until such a time as they come back with explicit direction,” said Beardy.Sources tell APTN National News chiefs in the room debated the need for direct action and economic shut downs. There was also discussions around strategies to avoid injunctions and arrests. But many chiefs spoke of the need for restrain.Dene Nation Chief Bill Erasmus, who is the regional chief for the Northwest Territories, spoke passionately about the need to keep things peaceful, according to sources. Erasmus told the gathered chiefs the treaties were about peace and friendship, according to sources.Sources said Sakimay First Nation Chief Lynn Acoose also spoke for peace, describing the hanging of Union Jack flags during a particular ceremony and how the elders did that to pray for their treaty partner, the settlers who were their neighbours.In an interview with APTN National News, Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon, whose community was at the centre of the Oka crisis, said an economic shut-down may not work at the moment.“My concern is public opinion, public opinion to our cause is kind of shaky at best…I don’t think the regular Joe Canadian will sympathize much with us if we employ that type of tactic,” said Simon. “I would advise them (the chiefs) with extreme caution when they start talking like that.”The main focus of the meeting, however, was on education and the need to come up with options to present to Ottawa with Bill C-33 now flatly rejected.A committee of the Confederacy plans to continue working in the run-up to the May 27 meeting to craft options for a “counter-proposal” on education to present to Valcourt.Valcourt said in a May 15 letter to Nova Scotia regional Chief Morley Googoo that the education bill would remain on hold until the AFN clarified its position.Chiefs from the East and West coasts will also be discussing whether to engage officially with the Confederacy in the run up to meeting at the end of the month.Chiefs from Nova Scotia and British Columbia, along with their technical staff, showed up Thursday for a planned AFN chiefs committee on education meeting. That meeting, however, was cancelled by the confederacy.Eskasoni Chief Leroy Denny, whose Mi’kmaq community is in Nova Scotia, told the chiefs he could not add his name to the list of delegates because he did not mandate from his chiefs, according to a source. Denny said he needed to take the issue back to his region to discuss it before a final decision.AFN B.C. Regional Chief Jody Wilson-Raybould said the regional delegation couldn’t stay for the meeting because they were not mandated to be there.“I am not against the idea of the Confederacy, I just think that the Confederacy has to be duly convened. It has to be respectful of all voices and make sure all voices are heard and that process didn’t take place,” said Wilson-Raybould, in an interview. “None of my leadership are here. If we come to May 27 and all of our leadership agrees and supports reinvigorating the Confederacy of Nations as ascribed by our charter then I am 100 per cent supportive of that.” [email protected]@JorgeBarreralast_img read more