Youth charged with attempted murder

first_imgNewsLocal NewsYouth charged with attempted murderBy admin – October 20, 2010 616 Print Advertisement Email Twitter Linkedincenter_img EMOTIONAL scenes surrounded the Children’s Court when a Limerick teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was charged with the attempted murder of a 16-year-old boy, the victim of an alleged attack at a Corbally petrol station in July of this year.  The 17-year-old was arrested on Friday, July 23, the date of the alleged incident, and was originally charged with assault causing serious harm, and on this Tuesday, he was further charged with attempted murder. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The accused, who was originally remanded in custody to St Patrick’s Institution after the HSE told the court that they did not have “suitable accommodation” for him, returned to court this Tuesday when Det Gda Andrew Lacey cautioned and charged him at 15:50pm in front of his HSE case worker.He was further remanded in custody to St Patrick’s Institution, with the directions of the DPP to send him forward for trial on indictment to the Central Criminal Court. Solicitor for the accused, Darrach McCarthy, had told the court that his client had been under a voluntary care order to the HSE, had been taken into care and was being brought to a suitable residence in O’Brien’s Bridge at the time of the alleged incident.The Children’s Court had previously denied bail due to the very serious nature of the charges, with the HSE having stated they did not have suitable accommodation for the youth who had not been before the courts prior to the alleged incident.Mr McCarthy had said that his client needed the “assistance of the HSE now more than ever,” and that the charges were “preventing him getting that care”. Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleHungary’s expert dentistry serviceNext articleMurphy and Toner will look to be capped this Autumn adminlast_img read more

Cuomo Orders Testing Of Bethpage’s Ever-Creeping Toxic Plume

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Rashed Mian & Christopher TwarowskiGov. Andrew Cuomo has ordered the US Navy and Northrop Grumman to provide the state and a local water district access to monitoring wells so it can test for potential contamination caused by a toxic underground plume.Samples from the so-called “Grumman Plume”—the subject of a 2012 Long Island Press investigative multimedia report exposing its continuous southward journey and disastrous public health ramifications—will be tested for hazardous carcinogens by both the state and Massapequa Water District, Cuomo’s office announced Wednesday.“There have been too many questions about the extent of contamination caused by this plume and residents are frustrated with the lack of answers from the Navy and Northrop Grumman,” Cuomo said in a news release.New York Sen. Chuck Schumer, a Democrat, said testing of wells is “just what the doctor ordered” for residents in Massapequa, Bethpage, and South Farmingdale—communities where the plume has threatened water supplies.The news may provide some relief to residents and water district officials who’ve been lobbying the state for years to act. The plume is essentially a 4.5-mile long by 3.5-mile wide cocktail of potentially harmful chemicals which has been traveling south-southeast unabated for decades. The underground plume first crossed Hempstead Turnpike years ago and is currently on the verge of creeping past the Southern State Parkway.As recently as last November Massapequa Water District President Stan Carey wrote a letter to the US Navy and Northrop Grumman asking permission to sample monitoring wells to test for the “correlation between the TCE in the monitoring wells and the TCE emanating from” the plume. TCE is short for Trichloroethylene, which is classified as a human carcinogen by the US Environmental Protection Agency.As part of the state’s plan, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation will collect groundwater samples from monitoring wells in order to test for potential contaminants through a process called compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA), officials said. The Massapequa Water District will conduct its own independent analysis. State testing could be expanded if necessary, officials said.Carey thanked Cuomo for granting the water district access to conduct sampling and stated he looks “forward to continuing to work with New York State to protect Massapequa’s water wells.”The Massapequa Water District has maps charting the plume’s path spanning more than two decades.Local and state officials have feuded for years as to how to contain the plume and protect water supplies, with officials from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) even supporting “post-wellhead treatment” for a time—allowing wells in the hazardous chemicals’ path to first become contaminated, then receive treatment.Critics panned the contamination-first strategy and demanded extraction wells to stop the spread of the toxic plume before it contaminated more public drinking water supplies and ultimately, the Great South Bay.In his statement, Schumer accused the Navy and Northrop Grumman of “stonewalling” the water districts in their attempts to test wells.The Navy has an agreement with the state DEC that calls for it to actively track down and remediate hot spots in the plume.Residents in the impacted areas are forced to deal with the effects of disposal practices dating back to World War II by the former aerospace and weapons manufacturer, previously known only as Grumman.Grumman was credited with helping the allies win the war, but its handling of waste has since come under scrutiny.In 1983, the 600-acre Grumman Aerospace-Bethpage Facility Site was listed in the Registry of Inactive Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites in New York State.last_img read more

Tips for parents to mentally prepare their child for the school year

first_imgAnnaheleen Smith, The Hope Center counselor, says she stresses the importance of going outside to students. For his last piece of advice, Hope says to not just try to exist but to live. Just do so carefully. “So it’s easier to spot if something is wrong with the child,” Hope said. “Or the child is reacting in a way that’s not appropriate.” In order to do that, parents must do their research. This will help students and parents feel more prepared for the school year. During his sessions, Hope tells parents to equip children with concern rather than fear. “In the air,” Smith said. “Going for a walk and doing what you love to do because most of the individuals I do work with, they do like to be outside. They are involved in sports.” CONKLIN (WBNG) — With districts offering online learning, experts say it could cause an emotional toll on a child’s mental state. During his sessions, Kevin Hope, the founder of The Hope Center, says starting now, parents should cultivate a routine to mentally prepare their children. Hope also says to give your child some rules to follow whether at home or at school. last_img read more

Vuelta a Espana: Primoz Roglic retains title as Hugh Carthy claims podium | Cycling News

first_imgSlovenian Primoz Roglic wins Vuelta a Espana for second successive year; Britain’s Hugh Carthy makes the podium of a Grand Tour for the first time; Chris Froome finishes final race for Ineos Grenadiers Last Updated: 08/11/20 5:31pm Chris Froome, the four-time Tour de France champion, rode his last day in the saddle for Ineos Grenadiers Chris Froome, the four-time Tour de France champion, rode his last day in the saddle for Ineos Grenadiers