Drought Impacting Local Grain Elevators

first_img Facebook Twitter Drought Impacting Local Grain Elevators SHARE Not only is the lack of quantity a problem, but the quality is also an issue. According to Breazeale, corn infected with aflitoxin has been a serious issue. “From the beginning of harvest, we have been testing about every load, and we are continuing to do that today.”  He said the situation varies in different parts of the state with areas hit harder by the drought having a bigger aflitoxin problem, “We have had to reject several loads.” Facebook Twitter Audio Playerhttps://media.blubrry.com/hoosieragtoday/p/www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/10/grainelevatorwrap.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Podcast: Play in new window | Download | EmbedSubscribe: RSS Previous articleRegistration Deadline Nears for Hoosier Beef CongressNext articlePork Producers Have an Image Problem Gary Truitt SHARE The drought had a major impact on most farming operations, but it also has had a big impact on Indiana agribusinesses.  While lower than average yields are impacting a farmer’s bottom line, they are also impacting grain processors and merchandisers. Ben Breazeale, with Cargill in Lafayette, told HAT, “If you are a processor, it has become very difficult to source grain. If you are a local elevator, you are not handling as much grain as you would normally.” He added, however, that the volume of grain moving though the system is better than had been expected earlier this year. Country elevators make their profit on the volume of grain moved, so less volume means less profit. Home News Feed Drought Impacting Local Grain Elevators Some farmers forward contracted to deliver grain this fall; but, with poor yields, some of those contracts may not be able to be met which poses yet another challenge for local grain dealers. Breazeale said there have been several cases of growers not being able to meet their contracts, “Although the situation is not as bad as it could have been, because there were fewer contracts written this year than normal.” Yet, contract defaults pose a serious threat to the financially viability of local grain operations, “Just a few defaults can really put an elevators in a serious financial position.” He continued that running a grain elevator is a very capital intensive business and contract defaults can take an operation down very quickly.  Breazeale says most Indiana operations will survive these challenges, but admits there could be a few that do not. [audio:https://www.hoosieragtoday.com//wp-content/uploads//2012/10/grainelevatorwrap.mp3|titles=Drought Impacting Local Grain Elevators] By Gary Truitt – Oct 20, 2012 last_img read more

HUD Tackles the Role of Algorithms in Fair Housing

first_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily HUD Tackles the Role of Algorithms in Fair Housing Discrimination Disparate Impact Rule Fair Housing Act HOUSING HUD 2019-08-16 Radhika Ojha in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Discrimination Disparate Impact Rule Fair Housing Act HOUSING HUD Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: FHFA Shares Fannie, Freddie Stress Tests Results Next: Integration Announced for Provider of Loan Documents Radhika Ojha is an independent writer and copy-editor, and a reporter for DS News. She is a graduate of the University of Pune, India, where she received her B.A. in Commerce with a concentration in Accounting and Marketing and an M.A. in Mass Communication. Upon completion of her masters degree, Ojha worked at a national English daily publication in India (The Indian Express) where she was a staff writer in the cultural and arts features section. Ojha, also worked as Principal Correspondent at HT Media Ltd and at Honeywell as an executive in corporate communications. She and her husband currently reside in Houston, Texas. Home / Daily Dose / HUD Tackles the Role of Algorithms in Fair Housing Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago About Author: Radhika Ojha August 16, 2019 1,099 Views Subscribe As technology begins to play a more important role in the housing market, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has proposed to address the role of algorithms used by industry businesses in an amendment to is Disparate Impact ruling under the Fair Housing Act.The amendment is based on a 2015 Supreme Court ruling in the case of Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. The Supreme Court had interpreted that under the ruling, the policy identified must be an “artificial, arbitrary, and unnecessary barrier” to fair housing.HUD’s proposed rule, therefore, aims to provide a framework for establishing legal liability for facially neutral practices that have unintended discriminatory effects on classes of persons protected under the Fair Housing Act. The rule has no impact on determinations of intentional discrimination, the agency clarified in a statement.In its 2015 decision, the Supreme Court upheld the use of a ‘disparate impact’ theory to establish liability under the Fair Housing Act for business policies and local ordinances even if the policy or ordinance is neutral in intent and application if it disproportionately affects a protected class without legally sufficient justification.”The goal of this proposed amendment is to bring more clarity to the disparate impact rule,” Paul Compton, General Counsel of HUD, told reporters during a call on Friday. He said that the amendment has “nothing to do with the intentional discrimination” rules under the Act.Compton said that HUD was interested in hearing more about the impact of the proposed amendment on the role of new technology such as algorithms that used artificial intelligence to assess factors such as risk or creditworthiness.In its proposal, HUD said that many commentators wanted these algorithms to be provided with a “safe harbor,” under the amended rule.HUD explained that while the disparate impact rule provided an important tool to root out factors that “may cause these models to produce discriminatory outputs, these models can also be an invaluable tool in extending access to credit and other services to otherwise underserved communities.”The agency, therefore, proposed under the amended rule parties using these algorithms could be provided with methods of defending their models in cases where they could prove that these algorithms achieved “legitimate objectives.””They are intended to ensure that disparate impact liability is “limited so employers and other regulated entities are able to make the practical business choices and profit-related decisions that sustain a vibrant and dynamic free-enterprise system,”” HUD said in its ruling.Additionally, the proposed amendment clarified that the section intended to merely recognize that additional guidance was necessary to respond to the complexity of “disparate impact cases challenging these models.”Click here to read HUD’s detailed proposal and call for comments.  Print This Post Share 1Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

Aikey, Carter cash in with IMCA Modified wins at World Nationals

first_imgBrayton Carter, another winner on Thursday night, followed with the Friday Karl Kustoms North­ern SportMod checkers, leading flag to flag. Tony Olson was second and Kyle Olson third. Modifieds – 1. Jeff Aikey; 2. Cayden Carter; 3. Ethan Dotson; 4. Todd Shute; 5. Tim Ward; 6. Joel Rust; 7. Ethan Braaksma; 8. Derrick Stewart; 9. Jake McBirnie; 10. Shawn Kilgore; 11. Richie Gustin; 12. Kelly Shryock; 13. Josh Gilman; 14. Brandon Schmitt; 15. Scott Simatovich; 16. Wyatt Block; 17. Russ Reinwald; 18. Thor Anderson; 19. Anthony Hofbauer; 20. Josh Lam­bert; 21. Eric Barnes; 22. David Brown; 23. Kollin Hibdon; 24. J.D. Auringer Tony Olson started 18th and chased his cousin across the line. Third went to Kaplan.   Aikey drew the pole for Friday’s 25-lap feature and led the entire race to take the win. Carter and Ethan Dotson challenged Aikey several times, but he fended them off. Carter finished second and Dot­son took third, followed by Todd Shute and 18th place starter Tim Ward was fifth. Eric Knutson weaved his way through traffic after starting 21st and caught rookies Braden Rich­ards and Carter Koop, making for a three-wide contest down the back chute on the final lap of Friday’s IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stock main. Sept. 18 Feature Results Jeff Aikey was quick to return to victory lane at Marshalltown Speedway, winning the Friday night World Nationals feature for IMCA Modifieds. The Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot qualifier paid $2,000. (Photo by Bruce Badgley, Motorsports Photography) Kaden Reynolds fought past Koop on lap 11 and never looked back on his way to victory on Satur­day. Knutson ended in second with Koop taking third.  J.D. Auringer paced the opening laps on Saturday but Carter quickly moved from his fifth starting position and into the lead.  Carter never relinquished that lead, though Tom Berry did his best to reel him in. Modifieds – 1. Carter; 2, Tom Berry; 3. Auringer; 4. Dotson; 5. Cody Laney; 6. McBirnie; 7. Schmitt; 8. Ryan Ruter; 9. Reinwald; 10. Aikey; 11. Shryock; 12. Shute; 13. Kyle Brown; 14. Jared Van Deest; 15. Rust; 16. Barnes; 17. Sam Wieben; 18. Stewart; 19. Jordan Bartz; 20. Dylan Thornton; 21. Matt Werner; 22. Lambert; 23. Anderson; 24. Hibdon.  By Joyce Eisele Sept. 19 Feature Results Kyle Olson went home with a World Nationals title under his belt after winning the Saturday fea­ture. Olson started fifth and snatched the lead away from Austin Kaplan just before halfway.  Also the Thursday victor at Marshalltown, Mueller was in second behind Berry when the white flag flew, then timed the winning move out of corner four to perfection and took the check­ers.  Berry was second and Steve Meyer third. Northern SportMods – 1. Kyle Olson; 2. Tony Olson; 3. Austin Kaplan; 4. Peterson; 5. Schlling; 6. Rose; 7. Nelson; 8. Austin Schrage; 9. Geoff Jeche; 10. Brian Schrage; 11. Cory Van Zante; 12. Hilmer; 13. Peterson; 14. Josh Sink; 15. Fred Leytham; 16. Joseph Luethje; 17. Plate; 18. Carter; 19. Suckow; 20. Kevin Yearington; 21. VanWyk; 22. Mallicoat; 23. Morehouse.center_img Knutson took the win at the line, with Richards going second and Koop third. Cayden Carter put his name on the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational with his $2,000 IMCA Modi­fied victory Saturday at Marshalltown Speedway’s World Nationals. (Photo by Bruce Badgley, Motorsports Photography) More than 160 cars were entered each night of the season-ending special at Marshalltown. Stock Cars – 1. Dallon Murty; 2. Shawn Ritter; 3. Chanse Hollatz; 4. Damon Murty; 5. Tom Berry; 6. Todd Reitzler; 7. David Atcher; 8. Scott Rice; 9. Joe Zrostlik; 10. Steve Meyer; 11. Tyler Pickett; 12. Jason Hall; 13. Josh Mroczkowski; 14. Mike Van Genderen; 15. Eric Zwirschitz; 16. John Heinz; 17. Kellie Drury; 18. Kyle Resch; 19. Rod Richards; 20. John Adams; 21. Gary Bass; 22. Erick Knutsen; 23. Don Vis; 24. Austin Gray. Dallon Murty raced from 10th starting to win Friday’s IMCA Sunoco Stock Car feature ahead of Shawn Ritter and Chance Hollatz. Damon Murty and Berry, driving from 21st in his divisional de­but, were fourth and fifth, respectively. Berry, Auringer, the 21st starting Dotson and Cody Laney completed the top five. Aikey made it back-to-back trips to victory lane, following his Thursday night Dale DeFrance Memo­rial IMCA Late Model victory in the 500th and final Summer Series event. Carter joined Ai­key on the Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot with the Saturday checkers. MARSHALLTOWN, Iowa (Sept. 18-19) – Jeff Aikey and Cayden Carter were $2,000 IMCA Modi­fied feature winners at Marshalltown Speedway’s 14th annual World Nationals. Saturday’s green, white, checkered finish ended with Jeff Mueller in front. Northern SportMods – 1. Brayton Carter; 2. Tony Olson; 3. Kyle Olson; 4. Travis Peterson; 5. Johnathon Logue; 6. Austin Schrage; 7. Brian Schrage; 8. Jenae Gustin; 9. Ryan Schilling; 10. Ryan King; 11. Dylan VanWyk; 12. Tim Fobian; 13. Cory Rose; 14. Cole Suckow; 15. Izac Mal­licoat; 16. Gage Neal; 17. Clint Morehouse; 18. Garrett Nelson; 19. Troy Burkhart; 20. Michael Plate Sr.; 21. Chance Huston; 22. Tyler Inman; 23. Devyn Peterson; 24. Jarett Franzen.  Stock Cars – 1. Jeff Mueller; 2. Berry; 3. Meyer; 4. Rice; 5. Shawn Ritter; 6. Pickett; 7. Reitzler; 8. Zwirschitz; 9. Damon Murty; 10. Atcher; 11. Derrick Agee; 12. Kenzie Ritter; 13. Resch; 14. Michael Peterson; 15. Knutsen; 16. Leah Wroten; 17. Dallon Murty; 18. Van Genderen; 19. Rick Dix; 20. Hall; 21. Schmidt; 22. Mroczkowski; 23. Kevin Rose; 24. John Adams. Hobby Stocks – 1. Eric Knutson; 2. Braden Richards; 3. Carter Koop; 4. Aaron Rudolph; 5. Matt Brown; 6. Patrick Pellman; 7. Curt Reed; 8. Shane Butler; 9. August Bach; 10. Austin Mehmen; 11. Jeremiah Andrews; 12. Luke Schluetter; 13. Dustin Jackson; 14. Patrick Oestreich; 15. Seth Butler; 16. Clint Nelson; 17. Matt Wahl; 18. Kevin LeBeau; 19. Miciah Hidlebaugh; 20. Luke Bird; 21. Jim Mehmen; 22. Marcus Wayne; 23. Kaden Reynolds; 24. Solomon Bennett. Hobby Stocks – 1. Reynolds; 2. Knutson; 3. Koop; 4. Hidlebaugh; 5. Richards; 6. Oestreich; 7. Schluetter; 8. Rudolph; 9. Reed; 10. Bennett; 11. Brandon White; 12. Butler; 13. Jonathan Schroeder; 14. Ray Fees; 15. Jackson; 16. Bird; 17. Wahl; 18. Wayne; 19. Andrews; 20. Mehmen; 21. Ben Newhouse; 22. LeBeau; 23. Tom Killen Jr.; 24. Josh Killen.last_img read more